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Congressman Proposes 2-Year Ban on Internet Related Bills

By - Source: CNN | B 29 comments

A cooling-off period would prevent the federal government from introducing new internet regulation or bills.

A congressman has suggested a new proposal should come into fruition in order to temporarily stop the federal government from producing bills and regulations related to the internet.

Recent attempts to regulate the open web in the form of SOPA, PIPA, and CISPA have all been shelved after its failure to be passed in Congress. U.S. Rep. Darrell Issa, who was one of the strong supporters against the former two bills, released a draft of the proposed bill in question, titled the "Internet American Moratorium Act 2012", to Project Madison, a crowdsourcing platform.

The bill, if it did pass, it would "create a two-year moratorium on any new laws, rules or regulations governing the Internet." The Internet American Moratorium Act 2012 discussion draft states:

SEC. 3. It is resolved in the House of Representatives and Senate that they shall not pass any new legislation for a period of 2 years from the date of enactment of this Act that would require individuals or corporations engaged in activities on the Internet to meet additional requirements or activities. After 90 days of passage of this Act no Department or Agency of the United States shall publish new rules or regulations, or finalize or otherwise enforce or give lawful effect to draft rules or regulations affecting the Internet until a period of at least 2 years from the enactment of this legislation has elapsed.

Following the proposed bill being posted to Project Madison, Issa linked the draft bill on Reddit. He said on the aggregation site: "Together, we can make Washington take a break from messing w/ the Internet."

"After SOPA and PIPA (the Senate's similar Protect Intellectual Property Act), it became very clear that we needed a cooling-off period to figure out a better way to create policy that impacts Internet users, job creators and all Americans," an unnnamed spokesman for Issa told CNN.

A recent bill, if passed, would have given the feds unprecedented, warantless access to American users' email accounts, as well as other private data such as Google Docs files and Twitter direct messages. Following an uproar, the congressman amended the bill for the second time and reverted it back to serve its original purpose of protecting privacy.


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  • 23 Hide
    contentsmayvary , November 29, 2012 11:08 AM
    "Darrell Issa, who was one of the strong supporters against the former two bills"

    "Supporters against"? Not "opponents of"? Tisk. Journalists and their poor grammar.
  • 22 Hide
    Jerky_san , November 29, 2012 11:30 AM
    Gotta admit this is one of the first things out of a senator's mouth in a while that makes sense..
Other Comments
  • 23 Hide
    contentsmayvary , November 29, 2012 11:08 AM
    "Darrell Issa, who was one of the strong supporters against the former two bills"

    "Supporters against"? Not "opponents of"? Tisk. Journalists and their poor grammar.
  • 7 Hide
    Anonymous , November 29, 2012 11:12 AM
    Silly congressman, the government doesn't need to follow any laws.
  • 8 Hide
    wannabepro , November 29, 2012 11:26 AM
    Good beginning, but now we've got to:
    A. Re-elect this guy.
    B. Help him to understand that this bill should be for over 9000 years.
    C. Pass the bill.
    D. Buy Black Ops 2 and start playing Tranzit.
  • 22 Hide
    Jerky_san , November 29, 2012 11:30 AM
    Gotta admit this is one of the first things out of a senator's mouth in a while that makes sense..
  • 4 Hide
    contentsmayvary , November 29, 2012 11:38 AM
    Have to agree with that. :) 
  • 1 Hide
    mikenygmail , November 29, 2012 11:41 AM
    20? Try 200 - Maybe by then we will have advanced enough not to need this anymore.
  • 6 Hide
    mikenygmail , November 29, 2012 11:41 AM
    Wishful thinking on my part, thinking it was 20...
  • 0 Hide
    the great randini , November 29, 2012 12:03 PM
    this sounds like a good idea to me, i think about sopa and how they tried to pass bills about things they dont even understand. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ltHITod2ONs
  • 7 Hide
    Anonymous , November 29, 2012 12:03 PM
    @memadmax: You do know that Issa is a Republican, right?
  • -1 Hide
    kcorp2003 , November 29, 2012 12:10 PM
    I hope they don't trick us and after that 2 years is over, the people won't even remember what was happening and they vote on the bill and pass it. They should just let the ban be permanent. Also there's similar bills that does the same thing, different name, same thing.
  • 1 Hide
    WithoutWeakness , November 29, 2012 12:13 PM
    So the bill title is abbreviated as "IAMA" and the guy who wrote it linked a copy of the draft to Reddit?

    Clever.
  • 2 Hide
    wannabepro , November 29, 2012 12:25 PM
    memadmaxThey know they can't pass anything with a republican controlled House...So thats why you have this bill for 2 years in the probable hopes that the Dems win back the house in 2014...Good Luck Jim >_>

    Democrats are the ones who try passing bills like SOPA and PIPA in the first place.

    Hopefully we'll have a Republican controlled Senate within a couple of years. They'll be able to stem the tide of retarded ideas streaming from our out of touch Democratic President and Congressman.
  • 0 Hide
    kellybean , November 29, 2012 12:27 PM
    To enhance this story let it be known that it is Rep. Darrell Issa, a Republican from California who is proposing this. I'm sure the DemocRATS are already rubbing their greedy hands together with more TAXES in mind.
  • 0 Hide
    wannabepro , November 29, 2012 12:27 PM
    FYI:
    Quote:
    U.S. Rep. Darrell Issa, who was one of the strong supporters against the former two bills, released a draft of the proposed bill in question, titled the "Internet American Moratorium Act 2012", to Project Madison, a crowdsourcing platform.


    So quit believing everything the biased liberal media tells you and start thinking for yourself.
  • 1 Hide
    Anonymous , November 29, 2012 12:33 PM
    Hmmm... they didn't mention it was a republican proposing this. A republican actually having some common sense. Too bad he one of the few.
  • -4 Hide
    retirepresident , November 29, 2012 12:45 PM
    Never Trust are Government. Every day they are taking away are rights. Only thing I can say...Never let them take are first and second amendment. We are !@#$ing DOOM.
  • 6 Hide
    Anonymous , November 29, 2012 12:50 PM
    SOPA was proposed by Lamar S. Smith, a Republican from Texas.
    PIPA was introduced by Patrick Leahy, a Democrat from Vermont, and that bill was stopped by Democratic senator Ron Wyden of Oregon.
    CISPA was introduced by US representative Michael Rogers, Republican from MI.

    If you all are going to start throwing out political blame for these bs bills, at least do a little research, instead of automatically blaming Democrats for stuff.

    It took me less than a minute on Google to find this info.
  • 5 Hide
    ElMoIsEviL , November 29, 2012 1:00 PM
    Quote:
    Good beginning, but now we've got to:
    A. Re-elect this guy.
    B. Help him to understand that this bill should be for over 9000 years.
    C. Pass the bill.
    D. Buy Black Ops 2 and start playing Tranzit.


    Why re-elect him? I say get rid of all of them. He might hold a positive opinion on this issue but on a whole slew of others issues (including Women's Rights) Issa is a retarded step monkey.


    Quote:
    Democrats are the ones who try passing bills like SOPA and PIPA in the first place.

    Hopefully we'll have a Republican controlled Senate within a couple of years. They'll be able to stem the tide of retarded ideas streaming from our out of touch Democratic President and Congressman.


    I see... I wonder who pushed for the Patriot Act? For the invasion of Iraq? For the FISA bill? Democrat or Republican... both are corrupt parties. It is a false dichotomy to assume that they're not "alike" or are the only choices at our disposal.


    Quote:
    FYI:
    Quote:
    U.S. Rep. Darrell Issa, who was one of the strong supporters against the former two bills, released a draft of the proposed bill in question, titled the "Internet American Moratorium Act 2012", to Project Madison, a crowdsourcing platform.


    So quit believing everything the biased liberal media tells you and start thinking for yourself.


    Biased Liberal Media? How about simply calling it what it is. The Corporate Media. Each Corporate Media Institution having a different internal policy re: Ethics & Morals. What we see, on TV, is not only the "news" but the "news" through this Corporate Prism. These Corporations are welfare Queens suckling at the Tax Payers teets. They lobby and get their way. In fact in this case we're talking about large Media conglomerates lobbying Congress, Senate etc in order to pass strong laws to regulate the Internet on the argument/principle of Patents and Intellectual Property rights (which are illegitimate... there is no such thing as an Intellectual Property Right). The Media is owned by those very same large Media Conglomerates. Therefore is it really any wonder why the Media Institutions tend to support regulating the Internet?

    Liberal Media? No... Corporatist Media.

    With Fox News you get Pro-Oil, Pro-War and Anti-Union, Anti-Women's Rights, Pro-Racism rhetoric etc (the interests they represent). For CNN you get a Pro-War, Both ways on Unions (trying to find a Middle Ground), Pro Women's Rights, Anti-Racism in a way that is racist (splitting up America into Colors like Black America, White America etc). MSNBC is like Fox only with a penchant for Facts (cept when it comes to Economics) rather than bullshit. Problem is that even if you're right... doesn't mean you have the right to force your views onto others.

    So I don't get the logic of your world view. You don't seem to actually factor in Economic principles (Homesteading, Property Acquisition Principles or otherwise). Rather you seem to simply regurgitate talking points from pundits that actually are not in keeping with Freed Markets principles.
  • 5 Hide
    Anonymous , November 29, 2012 1:19 PM
    You can't fool all of the people all of the time, and that's why the two parties take turns.
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