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Renegade R2 SSDs Ships, 256 GB Version Soon

By - Source: Tom's Hardware US | B 19 comments

pureSilicon has shipped its line of rugged SSDs, with a 256 GB version to follow in Q1 2010.

Earlier today, pureSilicon announced that its latest generation of "ruggedized" solid-state drives (SSDs), the Renegade R2, is now shipping to a specialty store near you. Although the drives probably wouldn't last in the hands of an elementary school boy, the Renegades are built tough and even look a little rugged around the (jagged) edges.

Right now consumers can pick up the 4 GB, 8 GB, 32 GB, 64 GB, and 128 GB versions, each with an SATA II configuration and a low profile (9.5-mm height), 2.5-inch form factor. pureSilicon plans to release a 256 GB version along with PATA, 1.8-inch form factor, and encryption versions of all Renegade R2 drives during Q1 2010.

Under the "hood," the SSDs have sequential read speeds of up to 255 MB/sec., and sequential write speeds of up to 180 MB/sec. However, pureSilicon said that the drives also feature improved IOPS (random read: 18,000 IOPS @ 4K; random write: 1,200 IOPS @ 4K) and proprietary SiPher data security technology.

Based on comments made by pureSilicon founder and CEO Jason Breakstone, the SSDs are tailored for defense, military, industrial, and government markets that require high-performance and rugged storage solutions. "Renegade R2 is designed to operate in the harshest conditions," he said.

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  • 3 Hide
    acecombat , October 26, 2009 11:44 PM
    Still waiting for $1/1g SSDs...
  • 6 Hide
    acecombat , October 26, 2009 11:46 PM
    Should of been "$1 per 1g". Still need that edit button Toms!
  • 0 Hide
    ominous prime , October 27, 2009 12:11 AM
    acecombatShould of been "$1 per 1g". Still need that edit button Toms!


    They definitely need an edit, these SSD's just seem too expensive to rationalize the cost/performance and put one in my rig. I'll wait until their mainstream and put that money into a couple 1tb storage drives.

    But these are great for the super ultra rich enthusiast. Who simply has no time to let things load.
  • Display all 19 comments.
  • 2 Hide
    superblahman123 , October 27, 2009 12:16 AM
    This is for those "on the go" types, those who sport hiking, mountain climbing, scuba diving, base jumping, and spelunking while keeping their hard drive in their pocket you silly people. This isn't for "standard" use ;-)
  • 0 Hide
    superblahman123 , October 27, 2009 12:19 AM
    By the way, pureSilicon are the same guys that make the 1TB SSD for the ASUS Lamborghini laptop, they're bound to make a 1TB version of this too. pureSilicon sounds like some good people to get to know ;-)
  • -2 Hide
    wira020 , October 27, 2009 12:30 AM

    Based on comments made by pureSilicon founder and CEO Jason Breakstone, the SSDs are tailored for defense, military, industrial, and government markets that require high-performance and rugged storage solutions. "Renegade R2 is designed to operate in the harshest conditions," he said.

    mayb we could use this inside bulletproof kevlar in emergency... for added safety...

    is that a typo or do they really sell 4gb and 8 gb? it wouldnt even fit a proper OS... even some games surpasses that...



  • -4 Hide
    Anonymous , October 27, 2009 12:34 AM
    Got a long ways to go before I'm willing to shell out for an SSD drive.

    Currently I'm only paying anywhere from 8¢ to 10¢ per GB and that's for a 1-TB SATA II hard drive.

    If they can get the price per GB down to like say 17¢ to 15¢ per GB or less, then I would be willing to shell out the cash for a Good SSD drive.
  • -1 Hide
    Mysteic , October 27, 2009 1:24 AM
    I guess this will make movies where hackers break in the military computer and download like 8000 TB of data in 2 minutes more believable. Lets all be honest, military tech goes into weapons and vehicles not their PC's. Supercomputers on use HDD for backups and booting.
  • 1 Hide
    acecombat , October 27, 2009 1:33 AM
    wira020is that a typo or do they really sell 4gb and 8 gb? it wouldnt even fit a proper OS... even some games surpasses that...

    Well for starters, I doubt that the military etc. would use it for games. Secondly for a military or commercial purpose, they use slimline OS's with very little overhead, some are based on stripped down *nix and others are proprietry, but regardless, generally only consume a very small amount.
  • 1 Hide
    Anonymous , October 27, 2009 2:43 AM
    acecombatShould of been "$1 per 1g". Still need that edit button Toms!

    They have an Edit, just find this article in the forums!
  • 2 Hide
    Anonymous , October 27, 2009 2:50 AM
    MysteicI guess this will make movies where hackers break in the military computer and download like 8000 TB of data in 2 minutes more believable. Lets all be honest, military tech goes into weapons and vehicles not their PC's. Supercomputers on use HDD for backups and booting.

    Military also has a lot of research facilities, like in the Antarctics, or under ground to test, measure and research environments.
    This, much like the NASA with research in space;
    The drives that store this data in the past always have been slower FLASH chips in the likes of a computer's BIOS chip.
    It works fine, but is very slow, and limited in space.
    Thanks to the modernization of this technology, they can now store billions of bits of data on the fly, even in the roughest, coldest, hottest, or most vibrating/shocking environments possible (eg in measuring equipment close to an impact crater or point of impact of an explosion, where regular HDD's would crash).
  • 2 Hide
    fatkid35 , October 27, 2009 2:58 AM
    this one jagged edges doubles as a comb.the mac version will be smooth on the edges and white, doubling as a butt plug.
  • -1 Hide
    JOSHSKORN , October 27, 2009 3:40 AM
    I think I'm about 5 years away from having a SSD in my computer. Maybe by then they'll have something large enough AND affordable.
  • -1 Hide
    buwish , October 27, 2009 5:49 AM
    I'd take the Kingston drive over this one yet; a bit much and too small. Then again, all SSD's are and the cheap ones are well, cheap. I'll stick with my V. Raptor for the time being.
  • 0 Hide
    liquidsnake718 , October 27, 2009 6:24 AM
    Too expencive for now but the 256GB is a decent amount already for a SSD... I wish they posted the prices here... I guess I would get it at $1/1gig.... but I doubt that will happen anytime soon and more likely be in late 2010 for that ratio.... when SSDs are more common and already close to mainstream...
  • 1 Hide
    anamaniac , October 27, 2009 10:14 AM
    acecombatShould of been "$1 per 1g". Still need that edit button Toms!

    But... there is a way to edit your posts...
  • 0 Hide
    B-Unit , October 27, 2009 2:01 PM
    You have to go into the fourms, each article has its own thread. No edit button in the comments section itself tho.
  • 0 Hide
    dark_lord69 , October 27, 2009 3:20 PM
    prices?
  • 0 Hide
    rbarone69 , October 27, 2009 10:48 PM
    wira020 ...and rugged storage solutions. "Renegade R2 is designed to operate in the harshest conditions," he said.mayb we could use this inside bulletproof kevlar in emergency...


    I bet it wouldnt survive 10 minutes in my bathroom! mmm burritos