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Apple's New 21.5-inch iMac is $200 Cheaper

By - Source: Tom's Hardware US | B 22 comments

Apple's cheapest iMac is still expensive, just not quite as expensive as before.

Apple's iMacs have always been expensive machines. While that's still true today, you can now get one for a little less than before. Apple has introduced the cheapest iMac in today's lineup, is a 21.5-inch model with ultrabook class hardware inside. The system comes filled with a low-voltage dual-core Intel Core i5 processor running at 1.4 GHz and boosting up to 2.7 GHz. On-die we've got Intel HD Graphics 5000 and 8 GB of DDR3-1600 memory. Storage comes by way of a 500 GB SATA hard drive, though this can be upgraded to a 1 TB drive for $50, or to a 1 TB Fusion drive or a 256 GB SSD for $250.

Included, of course, is also an Apple Magic mouse along with an Apple wireless keyboard, so while the system will still cost you a pretty penny, at least you know it won't cost you anything more than the price tag.

Interested? The system is available directly through Apple immediately with a starting price tag of $1099 -- $200 less than before, and still a couple hundred too expensive, especially for an entry-level desktop.

Follow Niels Broekhuijsen @NBroekhuijsen. Follow us @tomshardware, on Facebook and on Google+.

Add your comment Display 22 Comments.
  • 12 Hide
    dstarr3 , June 18, 2014 3:30 PM
    Well, Macs are generally well-built, and it can be argued that the price premium is a result of the software suite that comes with Mac.

    Still wouldn't touch one with a ten-foot pole, though.
  • -7 Hide
    Skylarz , June 18, 2014 3:44 PM
    Well guys, it is a 4k res screen lol
  • 5 Hide
    N.Broekhuijsen , June 18, 2014 4:04 PM
    Quote:
    Well guys, it is a 4k res screen lol
    Nope, same 1920*1080 display as before.
  • 12 Hide
    squirrelboy , June 18, 2014 4:56 PM
    Upgrading from a 500GB to a 1TB HDD costs just as much as buying an extra 1TB HDD...
  • 10 Hide
    hitman40 , June 18, 2014 5:57 PM
    Quote:
    Upgrading from a 500GB to a 1TB HDD costs just as much as buying an extra 1TB HDD...

    Welcome to the world of pre-built computers online that people who aren't tech smart call "building their own computer"
  • 0 Hide
    cloakster , June 18, 2014 8:02 PM
    I don't understand why they would chose a ULV i5 to use instead of the much cheaper, but still faster Intel i3 desktop cpu.

    http://ark.intel.com/compare/76640,75030

    The ULV i5 costs more and they are charging less for it lol.
  • -1 Hide
    mrmez , June 18, 2014 10:16 PM
    Quote:
    Welcome to the world of pre-built computers online that people who aren't tech smart call "building their own computer"


    I'm tech smart, but i'd rather be doing wheelies than making sure my components are compatible and then building the system.
  • 4 Hide
    amk-aka-Phantom , June 19, 2014 12:51 AM
    Quote:
    I don't understand why they would chose a ULV i5 to use instead of the much cheaper, but still faster Intel i3 desktop cpu.

    http://ark.intel.com/compare/76640,75030

    The ULV i5 costs more and they are charging less for it lol.


    TDP. 65W vs 15W? Cooling the latter is WAY easier.

    Quote:
    I'm tech smart, but i'd rather be doing wheelies than making sure my components are compatible and then building the system.


    *Sigh* You aren't "tech-smart" then. Component compatibility is very easy to figure out nowadays. When in doubt, ask Tom's Hardware forums to verify. Takes a few minutes.
  • 0 Hide
    tryingmybest , June 19, 2014 3:02 AM
    For that price i can get a macbook Air ,plus a 200$ monitor and will end up having same desktop hardware plus a notebook. And with pcie ssd too.

    Apple got the pricing wrong this time.
  • -3 Hide
    tryingmybest , June 19, 2014 3:12 AM
    Quote:
    Quote:
    I don't understand why they would chose a ULV i5 to use instead of the much cheaper, but still faster Intel i3 desktop cpu.

    http://ark.intel.com/compare/76640,75030

    The ULV i5 costs more and they are charging less for it lol.


    TDP. 65W vs 15W? Cooling the latter is WAY easier.

    Quote:
    I'm tech smart, but i'd rather be doing wheelies than making sure my components are compatible and then building the system.


    *Sigh* You aren't "tech-smart" then. Component compatibility is very easy to figure out nowadays. When in doubt, ask Tom's Hardware forums to verify. Takes a few minutes.



    It is not about compatibility as you understand it, it is about everything works perfectly if you find mac logo on it. I have many hardware that stopped working on windows 8 , old hardware but useful and i dont want to buy new ones.

    Guess what, the ones that have mac logo on them still work on mac.

    Things like this. Plus , if you are busy at business, trust me , you will never waste hours learning about which hardware to get. Those hours are worth thousands of dollars. Thats why you need ready to work sure to work solutuions.
  • 0 Hide
    Blazer1985 , June 19, 2014 3:14 AM
    I mean, R U CRAZY??? With that solution you will have a fugly wire going to the macbook air to the monitor!!! Good compoothas don't need wires!!!1! /sarcasm
  • 2 Hide
    Blazer1985 , June 19, 2014 3:20 AM
    Tryingmybest, if your time is worth thousand of euros just pay an engineer, depending on your job a quad titan can save you hours of waiting every day and you'll never find something similar on a mac (at least up until today)
  • 5 Hide
    amk-aka-Phantom , June 19, 2014 3:53 AM
    Quote:
    Tryingmybest, if your time is worth thousand of euros just pay an engineer, depending on your job a quad titan can save you hours of waiting every day and you'll never find something similar on a mac (at least up until today)


    Titan is a wrong card for an engineer. They need workstation graphics - which Apple offers, but only in Mac Pro's and at ridiculous prices and only AMD FirePro, IIRC.

    Quote:
    It is not about compatibility as you understand it, it is about everything works perfectly if you find mac logo on it. I have many hardware that stopped working on windows 8 , old hardware but useful and i dont want to buy new ones.

    Guess what, the ones that have mac logo on them still work on mac.

    Things like this. Plus , if you are busy at business, trust me , you will never waste hours learning about which hardware to get. Those hours are worth thousands of dollars. Thats why you need ready to work sure to work solutuions.


    Spare me the nonsense. If you are busy at business, you have an IT department to take care of this. I'm a sysadmin and the only solutions that are sure to work are custom built PCs with high quality parts, proper 3-5 year warranties (default, not ridiculously costly "extentions" that Apple offers) etc. If you are busy at business, you know better than to dump $1100 at a system that "saves space" but offers specs of an Intel NUC. Seriously! http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/nuc/nuc-kit-d54250wykh.html will get you ULV Core i5 with HD 5000, you can spec it with up to 16 GB 1600 MHz DDR3L RAM, it's got USB 3.0 and gigabit Ethernet, you can insert any 2.5 inch SATA drive into it, you have HDMI and DisplayPort - attach it to any screen you want. Oh, and it will run whatever OS you want. $360 for this, add another $200 for RAM and storage, you got $440 for a screen or two.

    It's your own problem if you upgraded to Windows 8. Go back to your business and leave hardware choice for people who know what they're doing. Macs are nice, but they're not anywhere close to cost efficient or easy to administer. Besides, again, this particular iMac offers very basic specs. It's nice for Apple fans who just want a machine that works and don't want to select any hardware themselves, but if you run your business that way, chances are your users will be fine with just about anything - you obviously have too much cash and they obviously don't care what to work on. My clients would flip their $h!t at an idea of dumping $1100 on a machine that's only good for basic office work and browsing. xD
  • 1 Hide
    Blazer1985 , June 19, 2014 5:17 AM
    Hi amk, you got me wrong here :-D
    I meant that if your time is worth thousands of euros (and involves heavy gpgpu tasks) you better hire an engineer just to build your pc and doing the maintenance :-)
    For engineers (or realtime visualization in general) of course quadros or firepros are better suited while the titan offers unparalled price/performance ratio for gpgpu :-)
  • 3 Hide
    amk-aka-Phantom , June 19, 2014 7:00 AM
    Quote:
    Hi amk, you got me wrong here :-D
    I meant that if your time is worth thousands of euros (and involves heavy gpgpu tasks) you better hire an engineer just to build your pc and doing the maintenance :-)
    For engineers (or realtime visualization in general) of course quadros or firepros are better suited while the titan offers unparalled price/performance ratio for gpgpu :-)


    My apologies, hard to stay calm when there's a newly Mac-converted friend buzzing at my ear over Skype about how great their stuff is despite a massive premium and then reading this article and comments... Sure, I agree with you, though in the end you can't take money to your grave - if PC building is something you like, you'd do it no matter how much your time costs, 'cause you want your baby to be PERFECT! :D  If you don't know anything about it, then sure, better hire someone xD
  • -1 Hide
    fuzzion , June 19, 2014 9:38 AM
    Sure apple was innovative for 2 to 3 years sometime during 2007 to 2010.

  • 0 Hide
    applegetsmelaid , June 19, 2014 9:40 AM
    Tom's Apple related articles are my favorite! Keep 'em coming!

    I once bought an iMac for a steal because it had a bad hard drive. I replaced the HDD (which was a pain in the patoot) and got it up and running.

    My wife loves it ;-)
  • 0 Hide
    firefoxx04 , June 19, 2014 2:17 PM
    Ncix builds custom computers and only charges an additional $50. Buying mainstream and calling your self tech savvy is just wrong on every level.
  • 1 Hide
    velocityg4 , June 20, 2014 6:08 AM
    Quote:

    Spare me the nonsense. If you are busy at business, you have an IT department to take care of this. I'm a sysadmin and the only solutions that are sure to work are custom built PCs with high quality parts, proper 3-5 year warranties (default, not ridiculously costly "extentions" that Apple offers) etc. If you are busy at business, you know better than to dump $1100 at a system that "saves space" but offers specs of an Intel NUC. Seriously! http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/nuc/nuc-kit-d54250wykh.html will get you ULV Core i5 with HD 5000, you can spec it with up to 16 GB 1600 MHz DDR3L RAM, it's got USB 3.0 and gigabit Ethernet, you can insert any 2.5 inch SATA drive into it, you have HDMI and DisplayPort - attach it to any screen you want. Oh, and it will run whatever OS you want. $360 for this, add another $200 for RAM and storage, you got $440 for a screen or two.


    Just because a business is doing well. Doesn't mean that it is large enough to support or need an IT department. The time of many small business people can be worth a lot. But only need a few computers.

    When their computers have a problem and they don't know much about computers. They are losing money until they can get a technician out to see them. They have no need of a server, domain, &c. The limit of their server type needs can be fulfilled with a NAS, Onedrive and Outlook.com for contact and calendar syncing. Even this is advanced for many small businesses that do quite well.

    They don't know nor care about tech specs per dollar. All they care about is that it works reliably and fast enough. With the Apple you aren't nearly as likely to find the computer suddenly won't boot because the OS has tanked due to an error in Windows finicky registry, or has been taken out by a virus. All you have left is hardware errors which are just as likely to occur on any computer but really quite rare.

    If the Apple does have a hardware failure they can quickly and easily restore a new Mac to the exact same state as the old one. From a Time Machine backup.

    Personally for my main computer I use Windows. As an on site technician for small businesses I hate it when my clients get Macs. Since it reduces my support calls from them at least 75%. As the Macs just work.
  • 0 Hide
    BulkZerker , June 20, 2014 9:56 AM
    Quote:
    Quote:

    Spare me the nonsense. If you are busy at business, you have an IT department to take care of this. I'm a sysadmin and the only solutions that are sure to work are custom built PCs with high quality parts, proper 3-5 year warranties (default, not ridiculously costly "extentions" that Apple offers) etc. If you are busy at business, you know better than to dump $1100 at a system that "saves space" but offers specs of an Intel NUC. Seriously! http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/nuc/nuc-kit-d54250wykh.html will get you ULV Core i5 with HD 5000, you can spec it with up to 16 GB 1600 MHz DDR3L RAM, it's got USB 3.0 and gigabit Ethernet, you can insert any 2.5 inch SATA drive into it, you have HDMI and DisplayPort - attach it to any screen you want. Oh, and it will run whatever OS you want. $360 for this, add another $200 for RAM and storage, you got $440 for a screen or two.


    Just because a business is doing well. Doesn't mean that it is large enough to support or need an IT department. The time of many small business people can be worth a lot. But only need a few computers.

    When their computers have a problem and they don't know much about computers. They are losing money until they can get a technician out to see them. They have no need of a server, domain, &c. The limit of their server type needs can be fulfilled with a NAS, Onedrive and Outlook.com for contact and calendar syncing. Even this is advanced for many small businesses that do quite well.

    They don't know nor care about tech specs per dollar. All they care about is that it works reliably and fast enough. With the Apple you aren't nearly as likely to find the computer suddenly won't boot because the OS has tanked due to an error in Windows finicky registry, or has been taken out by a virus. All you have left is hardware errors which are just as likely to occur on any computer but really quite rare.

    If the Apple does have a hardware failure they can quickly and easily restore a new Mac to the exact same state as the old one. From a Time Machine backup.

    Personally for my main computer I use Windows. As an on site technician for small businesses I hate it when my clients get Macs. Since it reduces my support calls from them at least 75%. As the Macs just work.


    Its sad when apple PR tries to disguise themselves on tech sites to do "Damage control".
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