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ARM Releases "World's Most Efficient Processor"

By - Source: ARM | B 33 comments

ARM today announced a new low-power processor, the Cortex-M0+, which the company claims is "the world's most energy-efficient microprocessor".

According to the IP provider, the chip is designed to be used in home appliances, white goods, medical monitoring, metering, lighting and power and motor control devices to deliver an "ultra low-power" of 9µA/MHz on a 90nm LP process.

The Cortex-M0+ fits into a new product trend that is generally referred to as the "Internet of Things", which describes an environment in which simple devices are wirelessly connected to each other and can provide communication, management and maintenance capability. ARM imagines its new processors to be used in applications ranging from "sensors to wirelessly analyze the performance and control of domestic or industrial buildings, to battery-operated body sensors wirelessly connected to health monitoring equipment."

ARM said that the new 32-bit chip, which builds on the platform of the Cortex-M0, consumes only one third of 8-bit and 16-bit processors that are used in the application field targeted by the processor. Developers can use the ARM Keil MDK to compile and debug 32-bit applications for the chip. According to ARM, early licensees of the Cortex-M0+ chip include Freescale and NXP.

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Top Comments
  • 24 Hide
    Soda-88 , March 13, 2012 11:07 PM
    never thought i'd see a 90nm cpu be considered the most energy efficient in 22/28nm era
  • 21 Hide
    IndignantSkeptic , March 14, 2012 12:16 AM
    Quote:
    Quote:
    9µA/MHz


    Since when is Amps a measure of energy? Energy is measured in JULES. If you're gonna give amps, at least give voltage too.


    I love when people make mistakes while angrily pointing out others' mistakes. I think you meant "joules".
  • 15 Hide
    kcorp2003 , March 13, 2012 11:11 PM
    Soda-88never thought i'd see a 90nm cpu be considered the most energy efficient in 22/28nm era


    true but considering it uses a 1/3 of the power of a 8bit chip is sweet.
Other Comments
    Display all 33 comments.
  • 24 Hide
    Soda-88 , March 13, 2012 11:07 PM
    never thought i'd see a 90nm cpu be considered the most energy efficient in 22/28nm era
  • 15 Hide
    kcorp2003 , March 13, 2012 11:11 PM
    Soda-88never thought i'd see a 90nm cpu be considered the most energy efficient in 22/28nm era


    true but considering it uses a 1/3 of the power of a 8bit chip is sweet.
  • 14 Hide
    Tab54o , March 13, 2012 11:18 PM
    Home appliances? I dread the days when our microwaves, toasters and coffee makers have lan ports or wifi cards and operating systems.
  • 5 Hide
    esrever , March 13, 2012 11:23 PM
    Soda-88never thought i'd see a 90nm cpu be considered the most energy efficient in 22/28nm era

    makes you wonder what a 22nm chip like this will be like. Maybe it will be able to run on less than 0.1w of power.
  • 8 Hide
    Yuka , March 13, 2012 11:28 PM
    Tab54oHome appliances? I dread the days when our microwaves, toasters and coffee makers have lan ports or wifi cards and operating systems.


    Well, by strict definition, everything with a chip has an OS... And well... Samsung already has several appliances with WiFi :p 

    Cheers!
  • 4 Hide
    ashkal , March 13, 2012 11:40 PM
    Why 90nm ? why not less?
  • 2 Hide
    yezster , March 13, 2012 11:57 PM
    Hail to the era of power efficiency...
  • 1 Hide
    dudzcom , March 13, 2012 11:59 PM
    esrevermakes you wonder what a 22nm chip like this will be like. Maybe it will be able to run on less than 0.1w of power.


    I'd bet $10 your microwave is running unix right now.
  • 13 Hide
    madjimms , March 13, 2012 11:59 PM
    ashkalWhy 90nm ? why not less?

    90nm probably costs less to make?
  • 12 Hide
    dudzcom , March 14, 2012 12:02 AM
    Quote:
    9µA/MHz


    Since when is Amps a measure of energy? Energy is measured in JULES. If you're gonna give amps, at least give voltage too.
  • 3 Hide
    bak0n , March 14, 2012 12:03 AM
    Efficiency comes down to how much electricity is turned into usable energy. Just because something uses nearly 0 energy won't necessarily make it efficient.
  • 8 Hide
    deanjo , March 14, 2012 12:12 AM
    Tab54oHome appliances? I dread the days when our microwaves, toasters and coffee makers have lan ports or wifi cards and operating systems.



    I have to disagree. It all depends on the appliance. For example, notifications from items like shared washing machines and laundry dryers would kick a** in an apartment setting especially. *Bing* Your dryer is done... *Bing* The dryer is now free *Bing* The rinse cycle has started... etc etc etc.
  • 21 Hide
    IndignantSkeptic , March 14, 2012 12:16 AM
    Quote:
    Quote:
    9µA/MHz


    Since when is Amps a measure of energy? Energy is measured in JULES. If you're gonna give amps, at least give voltage too.


    I love when people make mistakes while angrily pointing out others' mistakes. I think you meant "joules".
  • 2 Hide
    QEFX , March 14, 2012 12:46 AM
    "consumes only one third of 8-bit and 16-bit processors that are used in the application field targeted by the processor"


    I think something's missing ... consumers only one third the power of 8-bit ...
  • 2 Hide
    QEFX , March 14, 2012 12:50 AM
    qefx"consumes only one third of 8-bit and 16-bit processors that are used in the application field targeted by the processor"I think something's missing ... consumers only one third the power of 8-bit ...


    consumes*

    1) We need an edit option
    2) I need to turn off auto-correct
  • -3 Hide
    cumi2k4 , March 14, 2012 12:58 AM
    So how does this translate to smartphone usage? Don't tell me that i still have to charge it everyday...
  • 1 Hide
    tipoo , March 14, 2012 1:14 AM
    esrevermakes you wonder what a 22nm chip like this will be like. Maybe it will be able to run on less than 0.1w of power.


    It takes nine microwatts per megahertz, I think it would be under your 0.1W figure most of the time.

    As for 22nm, maybe with a die this small they'd have problems with power gating and whatnot to stop leakage from a smaller process, just a guess. Otherwise I can't think why something they want to draw the least possible power would be on such an old process, even 65nm would have higher yields and still be very attainable.
  • 1 Hide
    tipoo , March 14, 2012 1:16 AM
    cumi2k4So how does this translate to smartphone usage? Don't tell me that i still have to charge it everyday...


    Even a dumbphone (err, featurephone) would have a more powerful processor than this, its not made for smartphones and I doubt it could run a modern OS, this is for appliances that just need to send and receive simple information like power draw of other appliances.
  • 1 Hide
    soky602 , March 14, 2012 1:22 AM
    deanjoI have to disagree. It all depends on the appliance. For example, notifications from items like shared washing machines and laundry dryers would kick a** in an apartment setting especially. *Bing* Your dryer is done... *Bing* The dryer is now free *Bing* The rinse cycle has started... etc etc etc.

    I sure hope they put a "Mute" button
  • -2 Hide
    JeTJL , March 14, 2012 2:19 AM
    Finally, we will see +48 hour battery life again in our phones soon.
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