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Intel Moves Sandy Bridge Into Embedded Market

By - Source: Intel | B 12 comments

Intel told its partners that it is phasing out the Celeron B810 from its mobile processor portfolio and is transitioning the chip into its embedded offering.

The B810, introduced in march of 2011, was Intel's first Celeron processor based on its Sandy Bridge architecture. It is a dual-core processor, but like other Celeron processors, its cache is cut down from 8, 6, 4, or 3 MB to just 2 MB L3 cache that is shared by both cores. At a TDP of 35 watts, it is not a chip to be used in environments that depend on low power consumption, but its current tray price of $86, combined with 1.6 GHz clock speed makes it an attractive product for mainstream applications. The bottom-of-the-line of the mobile Sandy Bridge series is the 1.6 GHz B710 with just one core and 1 MB cache for $70.

The socket G2 CPU also supports Intel's basic processor features, including 64-bit instructions, VT-x virtualization, and SIMD SSE4.

Intel said that final orders for the non-embedded B810 processor will be due on December 28, 2012 and final non-embedded B810 chips will ship on March 1, 2013.

 

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  • 7 Hide
    DroKing , September 5, 2012 7:28 PM
    for that price... i can get a athlon IIx2 at 3.3 ghz... 80 bucks... uhh next.
  • 0 Hide
    alexthager , September 5, 2012 8:03 PM
    DroKingfor that price... i can get a athlon IIx2 at 3.3 ghz... 80 bucks... uhh next.

    Athlon is not nearly as efficient as Sandy Bridge though. Additionally, that Athlon will consumer nearly double the power.
  • 2 Hide
    artk2219 , September 5, 2012 9:52 PM
    alexthagerAthlon is not nearly as efficient as Sandy Bridge though. Additionally, that Athlon will consumer nearly double the power.


    Fair enough, but for that price you can pick up new mobile AMD A8's that do fit into that tdp, would compete with those celerons cpu wise, kick it in the face graphics wise, and give you 4 cores for much much better multi threading (if the application on the embedded system is doing much of any that is). Hell stepping down to an a4 or a6 would save you more money and still beat up on those mobile Celerons with no problems. I just see that pricing as ridiculous.
  • 0 Hide
    spentshells , September 5, 2012 10:22 PM
    Put these chips in netbooks and I'll buy a new one (old one died)
  • 0 Hide
    artk2219 , September 5, 2012 10:59 PM
    spentshellsPut these chips in netbooks and I'll buy a new one (old one died)


    The tdp is too high for netbooks unfortunately, they do however put the upgraded version in cheap laptops. This is a pretty awesome deal if you have a microcenter near you.

    http://www.microcenter.com/product/394499/X54C-RB01_156_Laptop_Computer_-_Black
  • 0 Hide
    ashinms , September 6, 2012 12:51 AM
    Don't really understand the need for an embedded processor with a ton of power. I've always thought of embedded running signs and point of sale machines. Only way I could see this being good would be in a large supermarket, running fifteen or twenty thin clients checking people out at an extremely busy store. I could be wrong. Maybe there is more to this than I think and that between the embedded device and the point of sale machines, the networking and math associated mathematics from adding and subtracting stock is huge. I dunno. Whatever. I'm sure it'll sell.
  • 2 Hide
    alexthager , September 6, 2012 2:31 AM
    spentshellsPut these chips in netbooks and I'll buy a new one (old one died)


    I've built about 30 computers with A8 chips and I love them. However, you aren't going to find one for $86. They start at about $99. Also, the least powering consuming A8 has a TDP of 100W. In terms of graphics, the Celeron won't stand a chance. Yet, in many applications, the efficiency of the Sandy Bridge architecture can outweigh the number of cores.
  • 2 Hide
    ashinms , September 6, 2012 2:37 AM
    alexthagerI've built about 30 computers with A8 chips and I love them. However, you aren't going to find one for $86. They start at about $99. Also, the least powering consuming A8 has a TDP of 100W. In terms of graphics, the Celeron won't stand a chance. Yet, in many applications, the efficiency of the Sandy Bridge architecture can outweigh the number of cores.


    Agreed. It all depends on the application at hand. Too bad there aren't many GPU accelerated embedded applications. If that were the case, the APUs would have begin to show their usefulness.
  • 4 Hide
    puddleglum , September 6, 2012 1:23 PM
    artk2219I just see that pricing as ridiculous.
    That is the way of all monopolies. It just goes to show that Intel doesn't believe they have any real competitors. :( 
  • 1 Hide
    Regor245 , September 7, 2012 3:42 AM
    DroKingfor that price... i can get a athlon IIx2 at 3.3 ghz... 80 bucks... uhh next.


    IMO, you can get an Athlon II X3 or even the A6-3500 (Triple Core) for that price. i've seen X2s under $60-$65.
  • -3 Hide
    mavroxur , September 8, 2012 2:19 AM
    DroKingfor that price... i can get a athlon IIx2 at 3.3 ghz... 80 bucks... uhh next.



    Too bad you're comparing apples to oranges. Your chip uses almost twice as much power as the chip the article is talking about. The point isn't balls-to-the-wall performance, it's more for reduced power consumption. Pick the nearest TDP AMD part and compare them. Uh oh, now it's a Sandy Bridge against a mid-range Fusion APU. Scale tips the other way, now.
  • 2 Hide
    ashinms , September 8, 2012 2:47 AM
    mavroxurToo bad you're comparing apples to oranges. Your chip uses almost twice as much power as the chip the article is talking about. The point isn't balls-to-the-wall performance, it's more for reduced power consumption. Pick the nearest TDP AMD part and compare them. Uh oh, now it's a Sandy Bridge against a mid-range Fusion APU. Scale tips the other way, now.


    With HD2000 graphics, you would also absolutely have to factor in power draw from an add on card for anything other than the most basic Point Of Sale machine or network router (or whatever the hell someone would do with a computer that doesn't have a half decent gui).