Intel Broadwell CPUs to Arrive Later This Year

Reuters reports Intel's CEO Brian Krzanich has said that the upcoming "Broadwell" CPUs would be arriving before the holiday season. This means that we'll be seeing the CPUs available before 2015 arrives.

"I can guarantee for holiday, and not at the last second of holiday," Krzanich said in an interview. "Back to school - that's a tight one. Back to school you have to really have it on-shelf in July, August. That's going to be tough."

That the CPUs won't be arriving in time for a back-to-school release is hardly surprising -- the Haswell refresh series of processors, along with the 9-series chipsets, just came out.

The Broadwell processors are expected to be built on the 14 nm lithographic process, making them smaller and thus even more efficient than the current processors that are available. The current Haswell Refresh processors are still built on the 22 nm process. Increased efficiency will help both thermals as well as battery life. The CPUs will continue to feature the same architecture as the current Haswell processors, placing a tick in Intel's tick-tock release cycle.

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  • dstarr3
    Ahhh, 14nm. I know it's just Moore's Law and all that. But, having been building computers for fifteen or so years by now, the shrink still blows my mind a bit. Earliest I remember is working with a 350nm Pentium II. I'll be excited to see what the next 15 years has to offer once we've shrunk beyond the limits of usability.
    13
  • MANOFKRYPTONAK
    I'm still rocking a Sandy Bridge i7, I haven't seen any reason to upgrade yet. I'm hoping this will be enough of a reason too. But with PCI-E 3.0 and DDR4 coming maybe... :)
    12
  • Other Comments
  • TheAshigaru
    Hopefully the performance gains will be better than the IB to Haswell jump. Not holding my breath though.
    5
  • dextermat
    Wait for second generation at least
    1
  • dstarr3
    Ahhh, 14nm. I know it's just Moore's Law and all that. But, having been building computers for fifteen or so years by now, the shrink still blows my mind a bit. Earliest I remember is working with a 350nm Pentium II. I'll be excited to see what the next 15 years has to offer once we've shrunk beyond the limits of usability.
    13