40nm RSX Allows for Lightest, Most Efficient PS3

As part of the usual improvements throughout the console life cycle, Sony has updated the design of its PS3 Slim.

The major change this time wasn't a new feature or a new form factor, but rather a die shrink for its Nvidia-designed RSX GPU. The chip has shrunk from 65nm to 40nm, resulting in a reduction in both weight, heat, and power consumption.

A teardown narrated by Japanese site PocketNews examines the power requirements and updated (and simplified) designs for the cooling system. Compared to the original launch console, the new 40nm RSX-packing model CECH-2100A has a heatsink and fan that weighs nearly half of that from the first PlayStation 3 design.

Perhaps equally remarkable is that the new model's cooler weighs significantly less than even the PS3 Slim model unveiled last fall. The latest simpler cooling hardware weighs 408g, while the PS3 Slim's one that launched last year weighs 545g.

Expectedly, the die shrink has reduced power consumption by around 15 percent – an improvement in all powered-states. When powered off, the console still draws 9W.

Check out PocketNews for all the pictures and translated details.

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  • ravicai
    The new chip also allows the engine to rev well past 8000rpm thanks to it's K20 technology.
    25
  • nukemaster
    I honestly would have kept the old heatsink. You can never over cool it. And then even a dirty heatsink will still have the cooling needed.
    14
  • nukemaster
    Anonymous said:
    I was gonna pick up a slim for the blu ray player and FF7 and Tactics over the PSN. Does anyone know how to tell the diffrence?

    Got a scale handy :p
    10
  • Other Comments
  • ravicai
    The new chip also allows the engine to rev well past 8000rpm thanks to it's K20 technology.
    25
  • mister g
    Why would I care how much it weighs when for me a die shrink means better performance, or is this G80-G92 all over again?
    0
  • nukemaster
    I honestly would have kept the old heatsink. You can never over cool it. And then even a dirty heatsink will still have the cooling needed.
    14