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Puget Systems Launches Two New Quad-Socket Machines

By - Source: Tom's Hardware US | B 16 comments

Puget Systems, which is not related to the automaker Peugeot in any way despite Google auto-correcting it, has introduced its new Peak Quad CPU workstations. These workstations will pack up to four AMD or Intel processors. Thanks to the choice between AMD and Intel, users can have either up to 48 CPU cores with Intel Xeon configurations, or a staggering 64 cores when using an AMD Opteron configuration. Not only that, users can also install up to 1 TB of DDR3 ECC memory, though that costs about $24,000 in itself.

Users can also opt for Intel Xeon Phi Co-Processors as well as Tesla cards, Quadro cards or GTX-Series graphics cards from Nvidia and there's plenty of storage options available, too. By default, the systems are configured with the Rosewill Blackhawk Ultra enclosure along with an Antec HCP 1300W 80-Plus Platinum PSU. For cooling, buyers will find four Noctua NH-U12DO (AMD) or four Noctua NH-U12DX (Intel) heatsinks.

The systems can be configured immediately, but the pricing isn't exactly consumer-friendly. Still, be sure to play with the online configurator if you’re curious. Be warned though, these machines are NOT geared for consumer use, at all.

Follow Niels Broekhuijsen @NBroekhuijsen. Follow us @tomshardware, on Facebook and on Google+.

Add your comment Display 16 Comments.
  • 7 Hide
    Urzu1000 , June 26, 2014 12:11 PM
    Error: No words found.
    Condition: Speechless.
  • 1 Hide
    firefoxx04 , June 26, 2014 12:19 PM
    i need this
  • 1 Hide
    TechyInAZ , June 26, 2014 12:27 PM
    Thinking out loud: "I WANT ONE FOR MY VIRUTAL MACHINES!"
  • 3 Hide
    firefoxx04 , June 26, 2014 12:27 PM
    I just priced one out for $60,000 LOL
  • 6 Hide
    tom10167 , June 26, 2014 12:31 PM
    I bet playing Farmville on this is sickkkk
  • 1 Hide
    lp231 , June 26, 2014 1:06 PM
    I price one for over $90,000 LOL
  • 1 Hide
    BranFlake5 , June 26, 2014 1:35 PM
    I bought one for my grandma!
  • 6 Hide
    TechnoD , June 26, 2014 2:21 PM
    But can it run crisis?
  • 2 Hide
    rishiswaz , June 26, 2014 4:29 PM
    Great product, I wouldn't build my own professional system simply because I want a warranty and other support services and don't have time to troubleshoot for a few days. Time is money and even though for my purposes this is overkill I think their prices are reasonable and their warranty services are not too expensive. I think I found where I am getting my next workstation
  • -5 Hide
    mapesdhs , June 26, 2014 6:46 PM

    Er, really? 64 cores is, "staggering"? Please get with the times; an SGI UV 2000
    can have up to 2048 cores and 64TB RAM, and that's a single combined system,
    not a cluster. Heck, their *entry level* UV 20 has up to 48 cores and 1.5TB RAM. :D 

    Ian.

  • 5 Hide
    getochkn , June 27, 2014 2:36 AM
    Quote:

    Er, really? 64 cores is, "staggering"? Please get with the times; an SGI UV 2000
    can have up to 2048 cores and 64TB RAM, and that's a single combined system,
    not a cluster. Heck, their *entry level* UV 20 has up to 48 cores and 1.5TB RAM. :D 

    Ian.



    Is that 2048 cores on 1 motherboard in 1 standard case? No. It's a bunch of systems interlinked together. You logic is flawed.
  • -3 Hide
    mapesdhs , June 27, 2014 6:03 AM
    Quote:
    Is that 2048 cores on 1 motherboard in 1 standard case? No. It's a bunch of systems interlinked together. You logic is flawed.


    Not flawed at all. I wasn't referring to the case structure or anything else, merely that a single
    coherent system with a lot of cores is absolutely nothing new. And btw, it's NOT a 'bunch' of
    systems 'merely' linked together; it's a shared memory, cache-coherent, single, combined
    machine. The fact that its physically formed from multiple racks is irrelevant, as scalability is a
    key part of the design, and always has been (I have a 36-CPU SGI in my garage). To use your
    own lingo, just one 'machine', ie. rack, has up to 512 cores via 64 sockets (max 16TB RAM).
    The long term goal of the UV series is to support more than 256000 cores ad 8192TB RAM,
    something parts of the core logic can already handle - the tricky part is evolving the Linux OS
    to cope with the resulting scalability issues.

    Learn about the tech before posting falsehoods.

    Ian.

    PS. Ref: https://www.sgi.com/pdfs/4192.pdf

  • 1 Hide
    TheMentalist , June 27, 2014 9:03 AM
    Holy Moly!
  • 0 Hide
    nascarf1 , June 27, 2014 5:09 PM
    cool! we get the 64cores lol
  • 1 Hide
    Duckhunt , June 28, 2014 10:11 AM
    i want one so i can play tetris.
  • 0 Hide
    Draven35 , June 30, 2014 10:56 PM
    I want to run one through the workstation tests.
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