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AMD Bristol Ridge 35W A-Series APUs Finally Hit Store Shelves

Originally launched earlier this year, AMD’s 7th Generation Bristol processors were expected to ship in both 65W and 35W flavors but, much to the chagrin of small form factor system builders, only the 65W SKUs have been available until now.

AMD has finally rectified the situation by offering a trio of new energy-efficient 35W A-series APUs to the public in the form of the A6-9500E, A10-9700E, and A12-9800E. The "E" designation signifies that these are the low-power 35W TDP models. These new low-watt APUs have all the same features as their 65W counterparts: core count, stream processors, and on-board Radeon graphics all remain the same.

The difference, aside from the lower power draw, is the reduced CPU / GPU clock speeds. Base clock speeds were reduced by 500MHz on both the A6-9500E and the A10-9700E. The higher-end A12-9800E dropped by 800MHz. Boost clock speeds fared better, seeing a reduction of just 300-400MHz. Clock speeds on the integrated Radeon graphics were reduced by almost 20% as well.

A quick search revealed prices ranging from $105-$113 for the A12-9800E APU. Pricing on the A10-9700E is a bit more reasonable at $85-$92. Finally, the A6-9500E can be had for under $58.

Overall, we think AMD’s new 35W SKUs, though long overdue, will be a welcome addition to the company’s line of A-series APUs.

Bristol RidgeCoresBase / Boost ClockGraphicsGPU CU / Max FrequencyTDP
A12-9800E43.1 / 3.8GHzRadeon R78 / 900MHz35W
A10-9700E43.0 / 3.5GHzRadeon R76 / 847MHz35W
A6-9500E23.0 / 3.4GHzRadeon R54 / 800MHz35W
  • King_V
    I'd really love to see a performance test of these, as well as the non-E versions, to other entry-level CPUs, and how they stack up to the existing processors on the hierarchy chart.

    A comparison of how the graphics subsystem performs relative to the Intel graphics on Kaby Lake as well might be interesting.
    Reply
  • InvalidError
    20147380 said:
    I'd really love to see a performance test of these, as well as the non-E versions, to other entry-level CPUs, and how they stack up to the existing processors on the hierarchy chart.
    Nothing too exciting there, Bristol is still based on the Excavator architecture and 28nm process, which means it will have passable CPU performance and rank near the bottom of the CPU charts.

    Raven Ridge (Ryzen-Vega) is what I'd save the excitement for. Should be a substantial step forward for APUs.
    Reply
  • King_V
    Well, I'd definitely like to see more of the lower-end Ryzen chips on the hierarchy chart as well. However, I thought that the new A-8/10/12 CPUs would be equal to or better than the already existing ones, and the already existing ones are on the 4th tier (on par with 1st gen i5 and i7).

    But you're comparing apples to oranges. The high end stuff will always be on the charts, but entry level also has a place. Plus, I'd like to see, how, say, the APU graphics performance holds up to the current entry level cards... and again, to the Intel HD stuff.

    Agreed on Ryzen-Vega, though. That is definitely something I'd also love to see fill in. But, we've got to wait for those to be available.

    Each has its own market segment, I suppose.
    Reply
  • JamesSneed
    20147432 said:
    20147380 said:
    I'd really love to see a performance test of these, as well as the non-E versions, to other entry-level CPUs, and how they stack up to the existing processors on the hierarchy chart.
    Nothing too exciting there, Bristol is still based on the Excavator architecture and 28nm process, which means it will have passable CPU performance and rank near the bottom of the CPU charts.

    Raven Ridge (Ryzen-Vega) is what I'd save the excitement for. Should be a substantial step forward for APUs.

    Whats odd is Raven Ridge has been slated for end of the year. The Bristol Ridge release seems pointless, not sure what AMD is thinking here.
    Reply
  • artk2219
    I think Bristol Ridge would make a fine entry level chip,or mainstream chip, and allow for a cheap way to get into AM4, especially since the athlon x4 950 is only 60 dollars. You could build up decent rig piece by piece and sell off or give away your old pieces when done. Start off by spending more on a decent motherboard and video card, then upgrade the chip later as funds allow, or spend 10 more and get a gpu thrown in for the a8 9600. Or use them for a NAS, HTPC, firewall, tiny vhost, whatever. Now if only there were some cheap M-ITX boards to go with them.

    https://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=ENE&N=100007671%2050001028%20600438200%20601295134%20601294614%208000&IsNodeId=1&bop=And&order=PRICE&page=1
    Reply
  • artk2219
    20147594 said:
    20147432 said:
    20147380 said:
    I'd really love to see a performance test of these, as well as the non-E versions, to other entry-level CPUs, and how they stack up to the existing processors on the hierarchy chart.
    Nothing too exciting there, Bristol is still based on the Excavator architecture and 28nm process, which means it will have passable CPU performance and rank near the bottom of the CPU charts.

    Raven Ridge (Ryzen-Vega) is what I'd save the excitement for. Should be a substantial step forward for APUs.

    Whats odd is Raven Ridge has been slated for end of the year. The Bristol Ridge release seems pointless, not sure what AMD is thinking here.


    Maybe clear out as much as they can from whats left in their OEM channel, so they dont have dead stock sitting around when Raven Ridge hits and repeat the mistakes of Llano?
    Reply
  • kalmquist
    JamesSneed said: "The Bristol Ridge release seems pointless, not sure what AMD is thinking here."

    Probably the issues are that (1) Raven Ridge will initially debut as mobile only, and won't be available for the desktop until sometime next year, and (2) when Raven Ridge first appears for the desktop, AMD will offer 4 core versions that will be more expensive than any of the Bristol Ridge chips.
    Reply
  • JoeMomma
    Wake me up when the APU's have Ryzen + Vega inside.
    Reply
  • tridon
    I do think the 9500E has two less GPU cores than the 9500. 256 vs. 384 stream processors. As far as I know, it's the only low power version that has a change in the configuration.
    Reply
  • JamesSneed
    20147772 said:
    JamesSneed said: "The Bristol Ridge release seems pointless, not sure what AMD is thinking here."

    Probably the issues are that (1) Raven Ridge will initially debut as mobile only, and won't be available for the desktop until sometime next year, and (2) when Raven Ridge first appears for the desktop, AMD will offer 4 core versions that will be more expensive than any of the Bristol Ridge chips.

    Your points makes since to me, I didn't realize the desktop parts were a mid 2018 release.
    Reply