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Inland Performance Plus M.2 NVMe SSD Review: Fast and Cool

Powered by Phison’s PS5018-E18 and Micron’s 96L TLC, the Inland Performance Plus is a high-performance value.

Inland Performance Plus M.2 NVMe SSD
(Image: © Tom's Hardware)

SSDs such as the WD_Black SN850 and Samsung 980 Pro are some of the most responsive drives available and cost more than the Inland Performance Plus. However, with a power-house of a controller, the Performance Plus still competes well against these giants and leaves PCIe Gen3 SSDs in the dust.

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

While it was outmatched when tested under PCMark 10’s storage workloads and not quite as power efficient, in most practical real-world use, Inland’s Performance Plus managed to remain close to drives that cost substantially more. Its write performance is especially impressive, but with its SLC cache size being more conservative than the Gigabyte Aorus Gen4 7000s, the company leaves some performance on the table.  

Unlike the Samsung and WD, the Performance Plus comes with a heatsink to not only differentiate it from the many near-identical SSDs, but also ensure cool operation (and longer sustained speeds before throttling). The Performance Plus lacks hardware-accelerated encryption support, though, which could be a deal-breaker if you need the added security. 

Fortunately for Inland, many don’t need hardware encryption, especially gamers looking to deck out their new Zen3 or Rocket Lake build with a fast PCIe Gen4 SSD. The Inland Performance Plus proves a solid value for most at roughly $20-$30 cheaper per capacity than its competition. With its large heatsink to keep cool, solid performance, low price point, and a five-year warranty, the Performance Plus won’t leave you disappointed.

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Sean Webster
Sean Webster

Sean is a Contributing Editor at Tom’s Hardware US, covering storage hardware.

  • agello24
    i would not trust ANYTHING from Indlands. they used to make some of the WORSE devices i have ever used. i used to buy them back in the late 90's early 2000's. when people used to buy sound cards and cheap peripherals.
    Reply
  • logainofhades
    agello24 said:
    i would not trust ANYTHING from Indlands. they used to make some of the WORSE devices i have ever used. i used to buy them back in the late 90's early 2000's. when people used to buy sound cards and cheap peripherals.

    Inland is Microcenter's house brand, and their SSD's are actually quite good.
    Reply