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Parrot Asteroid Smart Review: Android In Your Car's Dash?

Music Playback

The Asteroid Smart supports music playback from USB, Apple devices, SD cards, and the radio. File support includes standard MP3s. Lossless FLAC/OGG is not supported natively, though this can be circumvented by using VLC. You can access and play back audio based on track information, folder, or from a list of all accessible files. CD covers are displayed on-screen if there's an image inside the containing folder. Parrot's native app works fine, though we tended to use Spotify for streaming and VLC for FLAC playback.

We attempted to connect a 500 GB portable USB hard drive loaded with 400 GB of music, but were stymied by the playback app's folder and file limit. This isn't an issue limited to Parrot; we've seen the same behavior from many OEM systems, too.

If you can't live without SiriusXM satellite radio, you'll need to side-load the streaming app or attach a portable receiver to the line input, since the Asteroid Smart doesn't have built-in satellite radio support and Parrot doesn't sell an add-on tuner. Personally, this isn't a problem for me. Parrot does provide the Spotify app, and I'd rather pay $10 a month for that. Alternatively, you can side-load Pandora or another Android-based music app.

Voice Commands

Voice commands on the Asteroid Smart work with your phone contacts and music playback. The included stereo mic is excellent, and we had zero issues navigating our contacts while driving. Stepping through a music collection is also pretty easy (unless of course you hook up a big fat external hard drive that can't be indexed). We weren't expecting it, but voice search works with Spotify too, allowing you to find artists and songs without taking your hands off of the steering wheel. That's a nice touch.

Not all is perfect, though. Our older test vehicle has a voice command button that successfully activates the voice command feature, but you have to manually choose whether you want to search through music or phone contacts through the touchscreen, somewhat defeating the purpose of the steering wheel button. Ideally, you'd want the button to bring up the menu and then prompt you to speak your selection.

  • Tanquen
    I’ve been looking for some time now to get a phone friendly head unit but they all come up lacking. You need to root them to get any real functionality and they are slow. Slow to boot and run apps with old operating systems and not all that stable. Pioneer now has AppRadio 3 but it still has issues also. Seems like such a simple thing. I just want to mirror my phone on the head units display.
    Reply
  • blackmagnum
    What a name!
    Reply
  • woodshop
    Throw in at least a dual core, 1 gb ram, Android jelly bean (for Google now) and a 720p screen. Only then will people buy these head units. Or, just tape your nexus 7 to the to the glovebox and it can serve as a secondary airbag.
    Reply
  • flong777
    It is interesting to see this third party hardware to update vehicles without computer touch screens but after reading the article, it doesn't seem worth the trouble. Even if you do a great job of installation your left with a buggy system and a mediocre GPS. It appears that third party updates like this one need to grow up some.

    What is the real deal killer is the mediocre audio - you would have thought that they could have gotten this right as the technology for quality audio has been around for at least 15 years.
    Reply
  • Bloodire
    $100 tablet and $70 software. Bang! touchscreen on your car. Oh and whatever is costs you to mount the tablet.
    Reply
  • daekar
    Why would I want to put something like this in my car when I and everyone I know has a smartphone? I just place my phone on the dash when I want nav, and I usually don't even bother taking calls while driving. If I did, I'd use a Bluetooth headset. Besides, lots of people keep cars far longer than they keep phones. 7 years from now, do you really think that this device will be able to keep up? The whole touchscreen control nav console infotainment thing is completely impractical. Take away controls with tactile feedback. Replace with a screen with almost no feedback at best. Add proprietary software and a dash of obsolescence. I just don't see it.
    Reply
  • the_crippler
    Now I find myself wondering what software Bloodire is talking about...
    Reply
  • tuanies
    11128834 said:
    Throw in at least a dual core, 1 gb ram, Android jelly bean (for Google now) and a 720p screen. Only then will people buy these head units. Or, just tape your nexus 7 to the to the glovebox and it can serve as a secondary airbag.

    You can do that but it won't look as nice nor would your steering wheel controls work.

    11129463 said:
    It is interesting to see this third party hardware to update vehicles without computer touch screens but after reading the article, it doesn't seem worth the trouble. Even if you do a great job of installation your left with a buggy system and a mediocre GPS. It appears that third party updates like this one need to grow up some.

    What is the real deal killer is the mediocre audio - you would have thought that they could have gotten this right as the technology for quality audio has been around for at least 15 years.

    The audio quality is fine, just the function is lacking. I believe they have TomTom on the Asteroid Market now too for those that dislike iGo.

    11129722 said:
    $100 tablet and $70 software. Bang! touchscreen on your car. Oh and whatever is costs you to mount the tablet.

    Will not look as nice though.

    11130207 said:
    Why would I want to put something like this in my car when I and everyone I know has a smartphone? I just place my phone on the dash when I want nav, and I usually don't even bother taking calls while driving. If I did, I'd use a Bluetooth headset. Besides, lots of people keep cars far longer than they keep phones. 7 years from now, do you really think that this device will be able to keep up? The whole touchscreen control nav console infotainment thing is completely impractical. Take away controls with tactile feedback. Replace with a screen with almost no feedback at best. Add proprietary software and a dash of obsolescence. I just don't see it.

    Some people want a clean look that doesn't require slapping their phone on the dash or just want an upgrade from the plane factory setup, maybe an old factory navigation setup. The removal of tactile feedback and controls are typically with cheaper cars, the luxury vehicles still have buttons. But 7-years down the road, you could probably replace this Parrot with a 4th or 5th generation unit :).
    Reply
  • tuanies
    11130452 said:
    Now I find myself wondering what software Bloodire is talking about...

    He's probably talking about GPS software, ie TomTom or Garmin
    Reply
  • brazuka331
    Add a place for me to put a SIM card for its on data and full Google Play store support and i'll buy it! Why is it so hard for these companies to make what seems so simple! We want an in-dash and works like a tablet with full android and not your sh**ty bloatware!
    Reply