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Intel Launches App for Offline Access to Product Specs

Chances are, if you're reading Tom's, you're something of a PC enthusiast. Still, even the most committed of PC enthusiasts have trouble remembering different product naming schemes and the specs for every processor under the sun. Intel is hoping to make that a little bit easier with the launch of a brand new application for iOS and Android users.

Touted as the best source for Intel product information, ARK lets users browse, search and compare product specs and check compatibility and code names from their smartphone, even if they don't have a connection to the web. Products included in the app are processors, chipsets, desktop motherboards, SSDs, server products, and networking products. 

The app is available iOS (4.3 or later) and Android (2.3 and up) and supports search via product number, ordering code, SPEC code, brand name, frequency, code name, and more. You can also download datasheets, find compatible products, and decode code names. If you don't have a smartphone, you can do all of the above from Intel's ARK website.

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  • Cy-Kill
    CPUBoss.com () already does something along those lines, granted it is only web based and doesn't have an app for smartphones.
    Reply
  • sherlockwing
    In before someone take a pot shot at Intel's 40+ Ivy Bridge SKUs.
    Reply
  • MANOFKRYPTONAK
    This is pretty awesome. I consider Intel to be top notch, just my opinion. This is nice Ill have to see for sure what all it includes, downloading it now.
    Reply
  • tpi2007
    Good, but ever since Intel transitioned to the ARK solely (from the Intel Processor Spec Finder, whose interface I found easier to use), they messed up a lot of data, and still haven't corrected it. A 130nm Pentium 4 Northwood 1.8 Ghz, for example, is listed as having a 68.1 W TDP, when that is plainly wrong (about right for a 180nm Pentium 4 Willamette, which is listed as having a 66.7 W TDP), the real TDP is 42 W. Also, the Pentium 4 Northwood with HT 3 Ghz 800 Mhz FSB pure and simply doesn't have a TDP listed, when it did back when the general public could search with the Intel Processor Spec Finder (if I remember correctly it's 81.9 W).

    This has been wrong for years now. They probably have the new CPUs information right, but it would be useful to not mess up history. If they don't take care of it, who knows if in a few years, in another transition, they don't mess up the current CPUs specs too. After all, what good is a database if the information you have in it is wrong or missing ?
    Reply
  • Marco925
    This would be useful for me while i work at the computer store!
    Reply
  • slomo4sho
    A simpler naming scheme that makes sense to the average consumer is apparently too difficult to construct so lets make an app to guide decision making...
    Reply
  • ipwn3r456
    Already knew that long time ago...
    Reply
  • MANOFKRYPTONAK
    I downloaded the app and I have to say it is well done :)
    Reply
  • 3ogdy
    NVIDIA - PAY ATTENTION....Android users would be happy with such an application since your product naming scheme has been a MESS for years now..GT,GTS,GTX, Ti...blah blah blah....

    NVIDIA - MAKE SOMETHING LIKE THIS...us users who build computers both for ourselves and for other people would REALLY appreciate it.
    Reply
  • shriganesh
    Thank you Intel! Hope AMD follows the suit!
    Reply