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HP’s New Monitors Are Certified in Ways You Never Asked For

HP E24mv G4 (Image credit: HP)

Have you ever been concerned that your monitor wasn’t fit for displaying your next Zoom call? Or were you ever shopping for a PC monitor and yearned for reassurance that it’d work properly with your precious Chromebook? Us neither. But if you want a new display and just don’t feel right pulling the trigger without some random software certifications to validate your purchase, HP’s latest displays may be the best computer monitors for you. 

Today, HP announced the HP E24mv G4 FHD Conferencing Monitor. Available in August (price not disclosed yet), it is, as the company put it, “the world’s first Zoom-certified monitor.” What does that mean? Obviously not much on its own, but according to HP, you can now officially “expect a superb conferencing experience with technologies designed to work seamlessly with Zoom.” 

Now, we know what you're thinking. Any display at all that can properly connect to your PC should handle your next Zoom meeting perfectly fine. But what the E24mv G4 brings to the (conference) table that most other monitors do not is a pop-up, integrated webcam with 5MP resolution. 

(Image credit: HP)

The webcam can tilt 25 degrees and has "improved sensors" for picking up color and light, plus an IR sensor for Windows Hello logins via facial recognition. This all leads HP to call the shooter the “world’s most advanced webcam in a conferencing monitor.”

The E24mv G4 also has two 2W speakers built-in and a pair of microphones for an admittedly complete conference experience--as long as that conference isn't noisy enough to drown out a pair of 2W speakers.

Of course, all of these features are totally applicable to any other videoconferencing app. And we’ve yet to see a Skype-certified monitor (enter diss about Zoom surpassing Skype here), for example, so there’s no big reason to tout Zoom certification over the integrated hardware. But at least someone’s excited about the Zoom stamp of approval. 

“We are excited to introduce the first Zoom Certified collaboration display for the personal workplace - the HP E24mv Conferencing Monitor,” Eric Yu, Head of Hardware Partnership, Zoom, said in a statement. “This is the first certification of its kind, involving extensive testing. Zoom is committed to providing video communications that empower people to accomplish more.”

Still, if “Zoom-certified” gets us a decent built-in webcam, microphones and speakers, consider our interest piqued...just don’t tell HP about Google Meet. 

Chromebook Certification Too

(Image credit: HP)

Just in case one certification wasn't enough, HP also announced the HP M27fd USB-C Monitor today, its first monitor to earn the Works With Chromebook badge. Google says the badge is awarded to “accessories that will work seamlessly with your Chromebook,” and that the products “are tested and proven to meet Chromebook compatibility standards.” But let’s be real. If you’re settling for a Chromebook, chances are you’re not very particular about your tech anyway. And let's not forget the fact that, if your Chromebook has an HDMI port, it will work with pretty much any monitor or TV made in the last 15 years or so, certification or not.

According to HP’s announcement, Google’s testing emphasizes “specific connectivity, input and power requirements so users have a seamless and compliant pairing experience.” You know what also has specific connectivity, input and power requirements? Literally every type of video connection you might use to plug a Chromebook into any other display.

Of course, HP’s announcement is quick to note that the monitor “also works with any USB-C capable laptop” up to 65W. This Chromebook-certified monitor is more open-minded than you might think. 

Finally, to top off the certification cake, the M27fd is also specced to run AMD FreeSync. You know, so you can put your Chromebook away at the end of the day and break out your gaming rig.

The M27fd is available now for $300. 

 Specs

HP E24mv G4 FHD Conferencing Monitor HP M27fd USB-C Monitor
Size / Aspect Ratio 23.8 inches / 16:927 inches / 16:9
Panel Type IPS IPS
Max Resolution & Refresh Rate 1920 x 1080 @ 60 Hz1920 x 1080 @ 75 Hz with AMD FreeSync
Response Time (GTG) 5ms with overdrive 5ms with overdrive
Max Brightness250 nits300 nits
Contrast 1,000:1 1,000:1
Connectivity HDMI 1.4, DisplayPort 1.2, VGA, USB-B, 4x USB 3.1 Gen 1 (Type-A)2x HDMI 1.4, VGA, USB Type-C, 2x USB 3.2 Gen 1 (Type-A)
Scharon Harding

Scharon Harding is a Senior Editor at Tom's Hardware. She has a special affinity for gaming peripherals (especially monitors), laptops and virtual reality. Previously, Scharon covered business technology, including hardware, software, cyber security, cloud and other IT happenings, at Channelnomics, with bylines at CRN UK.

  • GenericUser
    Sounds like an attempt to steer uninformed consumers towards their specific products, who are otherwise on the fence on what to buy and don't have anyone tech literate enough that they can consult to tell them that it's all BS to begin with.
    Reply
  • cryoburner
    "This is the first certification of its kind, involving extensive testing."

    HP: Sends monitor to Zoom.
    Zoom: Yep, it's a monitor alright.

    It does sound like it probably has a better integrated camera than most laptops, at least, and few desktop monitors include any camera at all. Nothing stands out with the rest of the specs though, which make it sound like a typical 1080p60 budget display, so its value will largely come down to it price relative to the quality of these components.
    Reply
  • spongiemaster
    GenericUser said:
    Sounds like an attempt to steer uninformed consumers towards their specific products, who are otherwise on the fence on what to buy and don't have anyone tech literate enough that they can consult to tell them that it's all BS to begin with.
    Look at the promotional picture. This is targeted more at businesses. How often is grandma going to be having Zoom meetings with multiple people? If you have dozens or hundreds of employees that need to be able to video conference, this is a much easier to implement solution than buying monitors, separate webcams and maybe separate speakers as well for everyone.
    Reply
  • spongiemaster
    cryoburner said:
    "This is the first certification of its kind, involving extensive testing."

    HP: Sends monitor to Zoom.
    Zoom: Yep, it's a monitor alright.

    It does sound like it probably has a better integrated camera than most laptops, at least, and few desktop monitors include any camera at all. Nothing stands out with the rest of the specs though, which make it sound like a typical 1080p60 budget display, so its value will largely come down to it price relative to the quality of these components.

    As you said, it is rare for a desktop monitor to have a built in webcam. The certification isn't about being able to view other people on a monitor. Obviously, any monitor can do that. The certification is that this comes with everything you need (screen, webcam, speakers, mic) in one package except the computer itself.
    Reply
  • cryoburner
    spongiemaster said:
    The certification is that this comes with everything you need (screen, webcam, speakers, mic) in one package except the computer itself.
    Really though, it sounds like the "certification" was HP's idea, so any certification criteria would be completely arbitrary, based on whatever this first screen had to offer.

    It doesn't sound bad for what it is though. Without knowing more about the detailed specs, I could see it being worth something like $300 provided the webcam is decent, even if the display isn't anything special. Though I have suspicions HP will probably be selling it for more than that, since as you said, they are likely targeting businesses. Having everything all in one package might be nice in such a scenario, though it doesn't seem like it would be significantly more complex for a company's IT guy to plug in a standalone webcam and mount in on top of a screen. I suppose we'll have to see how it fares in reviews though.
    Reply
  • GenericUser
    spongiemaster said:
    Look at the promotional picture. This is targeted more at businesses. How often is grandma going to be having Zoom meetings with multiple people? If you have dozens or hundreds of employees that need to be able to video conference, this is a much easier to implement solution than buying monitors, separate webcams and maybe separate speakers as well for everyone.

    I suppose that makes more sense. When commenting I had in mind the slew of phone calls/texts getting passed to me from family members last year who were finding themselves suddenly teleworking and had no idea what they should buy or use, and the question "will this work with Zoom" kept coming up. Yes, it's a webcam, it's a mic, those are speakers, they're going to work with Zoom, holy crap, stop bothering me.
    Reply
  • King_V
    This kind of reminds me of some of the IT certifications.... some are legit, but some seem to be "Let's figure out a way to make people expect something on a resume, and charge people to get that something, while not actually providing anything useful."
    Reply