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Onboard Integrated Graphics Gone by 2013

Market research firm John Peddie Research has released a report that indicates the end of the market for the popular integrated graphics processor (IGP) chipset.

In 2008 67 percent of the graphics chips shipped were IGPs, and JPR predicts that in 2011 it will drop to 20 percent, and by 2013 it will be less than one percent.

IGPs presently exist as an efficient and cost-effective way to ship systems with graphics, even if the capabilities of the hardware are sometimes barely passable. IGPs are, however, usually adequate for 2D functions such as running office applications.

Set to replace the IGP are on-chip graphics solutions. Intel’s upcoming Westmere chips will put the graphics processor and memory on the same chip (but not yet on the same die) as the CPU; and Intel’s Pineview will integrate the graphics and memory processors into the same die as the Atom. AMD will also be heading into the same area with Fusion.

JPR believes that the shift away from the IGP and into the embedded graphics model will not negatively impact the discrete graphics and add-in board market. In fact, JPR is of the opinion that with hybrid configurations will become more popular, thus increasing sales of discrete GPUs.

Marcus Yam
Marcus Yam served as Tom's Hardware News Director during 2008-2014. He entered tech media in the late 90s and fondly remembers the days when an overclocked Celeron 300A and Voodoo2 SLI comprised a gaming rig with the ultimate street cred.
  • eddieroolz
    I'll be glad to see the IGP be gone. All they do is give users barely adequate performance that ignorant users will blame on the OS.
    Reply
  • ravenware
    They will only disappear CPUs can render HD content at a reasonable rate.

    With AMD and nVidia stepping up the performance on their onboard chips we may see them stay around much longer as they are cost effective and efficient at HD playback.
    Reply
  • sacre
    You mean all the IGP's on all my motherboards will disappear on 2013? omg.. omg this is terrible, whats next, CPU's will disappear? our children? the earth?

    No seriously though, good news, IGP is decent but technology is booming and they are not, they're simply falling behind, restricted to size/heat etc, they can never be strong enough.

    RIP IGP, you did good for the past 20+ years. RIP.
    Reply
  • gm0n3y
    Sounds like this is just moving the IGP onto the CPU. This is kinda shitty since now enthusiasts will have to pay for the graphics on the CPU instead of just buying a MB without an IGP. Even with the ability to run discrete and onboard graphics together, this could dramatically raise temperatures and hinder overclocking.
    Reply
  • If GPU cores are integrated into the CPU, won't heat output rise a lot...?
    Reply
  • skine
    Aside from laptops, netbooks or nettops where there is limited space, the only reason I can see for either IGP or embedded graphics is just in case the discrete graphics card isn't working. Even then, it's "just in case" and is mostly restricted to when building a system or upgrading the graphics card.
    Reply
  • buzznut
    Saw this article over at Anandtech too. I thought it was a crock then and still do. If anything, IGP's are more popular now than before especially for htpc. Just how good are the graphics on a cpu embedded gpu?
    We don't know.
    Well, anyway my opinion is that we'll still see igp's for awhile still. for me personally I'm gonna use an HD4670 for my htpc, cuz I'll actually play games on it.
    Reply
  • I think the onboard/on chip graphics are good for mobiles, UMD's, mini-notebooks, laptops, and office pc's.

    They're not for gaming pc's.
    But perhaps there will be some form of SLI/RAID for the graphic card with an onboard chip!
    Perhaps your setup could benefit having an onboard graphics processor that could help the onboard pcie graphics card to give more traction in some games!

    I don't think this is negative, since the on chip/on die graphics solutions will be able to be disabled, and the extra metal could actually help cooling the cpu when not in use (larger surface, while relatively less powerdraw per surface occures)!
    I think cards like Radeons will be around for many more years. I think only onboard graphic solutions like GPU on mobo will dissapear.
    either way, the cpu will require only a slightly larger cooler.
    Reply
  • jhansonxi
    I can see a lot more complicated CPU shopping because you will have to compare the GPU specs along with the existing CPU specs. With hybrid graphics it may very well affect add-on video card performance. On the other hand, the parallel processing capabilities of the GPU could be available as a standard feature.
    Reply
  • IzzyCraft
    Well when IGP can display HD and aero without massive lag on decent resolutions i'll consider shoving it all on one die.
    Reply