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Raijintek's First GPU Cooler is the Beefy Morpheus

Raijintek has announced its first ever graphics card cooler, the Morpheus. This graphics card cooler is a big unit built for cooling quite a handful of single-GPU graphics cards and is built with a very large aluminum fin array and heat transferred through twelve 6 mm heat pipes. The base of the unit is made of copper with a mirror finish, the entire unit is nickel-plated, and the heatsink weighs about 515 grams without any fans installed.

To dissipate the heat, users can install two 120 mm fans for which mounting clips are included. Some might argue that not including fans is a bad thing, but with support for 120 mm fans, users can install their fans of choice and won't be paying for fans they might not want to use. Also included with the unit are a total of 24 miniature heatsinks for cooling the memory along with a longer narrow heatsink for cooling the VRM circuitry. Using the right fans, the entire unit should be able to dissipate up to about 360 W of thermal energy.

Support is present for Nvidia GPUs ranging from the GTX 650 all the way up to the GTX 780 Ti (and presumably the Titan and Titan Black), as well as AMD chips ranging from the R9 270 up to the R9 290X. It can also be used to cool HD 7850 and HD 7870 cards.

Pricing for the unit is set at about €50 with no word on US pricing yet.

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Niels Broekhuijsen
Niels Broekhuijsen is a Contributing Writer for Tom's Hardware US. He covers hardware news on all components and peripherals.
  • Shankovich
    Looks cool, but I'd really like to see more GPU closed loop liquid coolers come out.
    Reply
  • chuckydb
    Well, instead of having all that empty space because I've got 4 unused PCI-e slot right now, I woudn't mind making filling it up with an oversized gpu cooler. Over with the hot and noisy overclock
    Reply
  • DarkSable
    Shankovich, that's... a weird request.

    All in ones are underpowered and noisy, and replacing the CPU block is probably the most dangerous part of watercooling. Why in the world would you not go with a custom loop, even if it were a cheap one, if you're putting watercooling on your graphics card?
    Reply
  • soccerplayer88
    Incredibly interested if this supports my GTX 680 (stacked PCIE connectors). My Arctic Accelero has a rubbing shroud issue.

    Can't wait to see some testing done.
    Reply
  • tntom
    Do they make CPU mounts for this too? One for the GPU and the second for the CPU would give a lot of cooling capacity.
    Reply
  • RazberyBandit
    It doesn't have "twelve 6mm heatpipes." Someone counted both ends of six heatpipes separately.
    Reply
  • ShadyHamster
    So if this is anything like Prolimatechs MK13 it's going to be taking up 4-5 pci slots? Think i'd stick to an Arctic Cooling Xtreme.
    Reply
  • rwinches
    'Cause nothing says cooling like the overused movie name reference Morpheus.
    Reply
  • anthony8989
    13165560 said:
    It doesn't have "twelve 6mm heatpipes." Someone counted both ends of six heatpipes separately.

    It does. The two sets of 6 heat pipes do not connect with each other in the fin-stack.

    http://media.bestofmicro.com/6/7/427903/original/Weight-01.jpg
    Reply
  • WithoutWeakness
    13165560 said:
    It doesn't have "twelve 6mm heatpipes." Someone counted both ends of six heatpipes separately.

    It does. The two sets of 6 heat pipes do not connect with each other in the fin-stack.

    http://media.bestofmicro.com/6/7/427903/original/Weight-01.jpg
    But they are connected inside the GPU block. The ends of the heatpipes extend through the fin stack and the centers of the heatpipes are in the middle of the block. There are only 6 heatpipes.
    Reply