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Nvidia's Dual-GPU GTX 590 Already Sold Out

By - Source: Softpedia | B 59 comments

Nvidia's new high-priced, dual-GPU GeForce GTX 590 sold out in less than a week.

Softpedia reports that Nvidia's just-released dual-GPU GeForce GTX 590 graphics card has sold out here in the States.

Sporting two GF110 GPUs, the GTX 590 is Nvidia's answer to AMD's monster dual-GPU Radeon HD 6990. Both are packed with DirectX 11 support and geared to gamers with big, big wallets. The AMD solution is priced at an impressive $700 whereas the Nvidia card is asking nearly $650.

Given the card's high price point, Nvidia reportedly launched the GTX 590 in modest, limited numbers, just a few thousand cards in Europe alone. Presently Best Buy, Newegg and TigerDirect show to be out of stock here in the States, but cards are still available to purchase overseas.

It's speculated that the European price may be set too high, prompting reports of Nvidia dropping prices to get the cards moving off shelves. Price tags are now hovering around 603 to 610 euro although that seems way too steep still... perhaps reports meant USD? There's also indication that Nvidia is even offering rebates to some European customers which may justify current reports of the 603 euro pricetag.

Nvidia's new 11-inch dual-GPU, dual-slot card packs some pretty impressive hardware, using a 12 layer, 2-oz copper printed circuit board (PCB) designed with a 10-phase power layout. There's also dual vapor chambers, 3 GB of GDDR5 memory (1.5 GB per GPU) running at 1707 MHz, and a PCIe dual x16 custom bridge chip. To round out the package, Nvidia slapped on the two GF110 GPUs with a total 1024 (2 x 512) CUDA cores, and four individual video outputs for a max resolution of 5760 x 1080.

"The GTX 590 is the best dual GPU product ever built," said Drew Henry, general manager of GeForce GPU business at NVIDIA. "With leading performance, support for multi-monitor 3D gaming, Quad SLI, and an acoustic envelope that begs to be heard for how quiet it is, the GTX 590 epitomizes what a perfect dual graphics card looks, performs, and sounds like."

Given that Nvidia's GeForce GTX 590 was officially announced last Thursday, the sell-out is definitely quick. But based on our experience with high-end graphics cards, we reckon this has to do with limited supply and yield.

Display 59 Comments.
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  • 0 Hide
    Marco925 , March 30, 2011 9:46 PM
    I guess alot of people were waiting for that. wow.
  • 2 Hide
    zkevwlu , March 30, 2011 9:52 PM
    I was thinking about buying one of these, but when I went to the store to pick it up the sales rep told me 7 of these cards caught on fire when they were benched. Needless to say I got scared off. Can anyone confirm this?
  • 0 Hide
    cburke82 , March 30, 2011 9:52 PM
    If you can really get it for $650 thats a good deal
  • 2 Hide
    yyk71200 , March 30, 2011 9:53 PM
    First, GTX 590 does not have leading performance because it actually does not overtake 6990. 6990 also supports multi monitor setups with more monitors than 590, quadfire. I'll give it one thing though: it is relatively quiet. on the other hand, third party providers for 6990 can use other then reference coolers.
  • -2 Hide
    krinkles619 , March 30, 2011 10:04 PM
    zkevwluI was thinking about buying one of these, but when I went to the store to pick it up the sales rep told me 7 of these cards caught on fire when they were benched. Needless to say I got scared off. Can anyone confirm this?


    he probably wanted one for himself and was trying to deter you. no, they don't catch on fire, not unless you manage to do something stupid with them, or run them without heatsinks (which would fall under the stupid category)

    tom's did a review on it http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/geforce-gtx-590-dual-gf110-radeon-hd-6990,2898.html

    in my opinion and tom's opinion is that two 570's would be more thermally efficient and deliver the same results
  • 0 Hide
    newbie_mcnoob , March 30, 2011 10:26 PM
    As long as they sell, they'll keep the prices high. Just like Intel with their $1000 CPUs.
  • 2 Hide
    hunter315 , March 30, 2011 10:36 PM
    They arent catching on fire, but they do have abnormally high failure rates for a fresh release, their newest drivers decreased its OCP set point to keep the card safer and reduce the number that blow their VRMs like this one
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sRo-1VFMcbc&feature=player_embedded

    I dont think that them selling out is noteworthy, i think its a sign of low supply and possibly a reduction in supply until they get the blowing up thingy figured out
  • 2 Hide
    JeanLuc , March 30, 2011 10:47 PM
    Kevin ParrishIt's speculated that the European price may be set too high..........


    For starters who's speculating? Where are you getting this information from? Sources? Links?

    Also for the record there are loads of 590's in Europe (just checkout OCUK, they have a lots of 590's still in stock) because IMO people outside of North America have to pay a higher price to off set the lower price consumers pay in the US (the typical price of 590 here is £600 where as the 6990 goes for about £515-£520). How else do explain away the fact the chips on the 590 are large and thus expensive to produce yet are retailing at a lower price then the 6990 which is cheaper to make (the die's are smaller).

    Kevin Parrishperhaps reports meant USD?


    Again which reports are you referring to?

    Kevin ParrishThere's also indication that Nvidia is even offering rebates to some European customers....


    Do you have any evidence of this? Sources, links?

    Kevin Parrish
    Nvidia's new 11-inch dual-GPU, dual-slot card packs some pretty impressive hardware, using a 12 layer, 2-oz copper printed circuit board (PCB) designed with a 10-phase power layout



    Can you please explain why a 12 layer 2oz PCB 10-phase power layout is impressive?

    Kevin Parrish
    Nvidia's new 11-inch dual-GPU, dual-slot card packs some pretty impressive hardware, using a 12 layer, 2-oz copper printed circuit board (PCB) designed with a 10-phase power layout. There's also dual vapor chambers, 3 GB of GDDR5 memory (1.5 GB per GPU) running at 1707 MHz, and a PCIe dual x16 custom bridge chip. To round out the package, Nvidia slapped on the two GF110 GPUs with a total 1024 (2 x 512) CUDA cores, and four individual video outputs for a max resolution of 5760 x 1080.

    "The GTX 590 is the best dual GPU product ever built," said Drew Henry, general manager of GeForce GPU business at NVIDIA. "With leading performance, support for multi-monitor 3D gaming, Quad SLI, and an acoustic envelope that begs to be heard for how quiet it is, the GTX 590 epitomizes what a perfect dual graphics card looks, performs, and sounds like."


    Nice advert that holds no relevance at all the topic at hand.
  • 1 Hide
    aevm , March 30, 2011 10:49 PM
    zkevwluI was thinking about buying one of these, but when I went to the store to pick it up the sales rep told me 7 of these cards caught on fire when they were benched. Needless to say I got scared off. Can anyone confirm this?


    I don't think stores run benchmarks on video cards. Even if that one does, why would they do it with SEVEN cards or more? They lose money every time they open a card and have to sell it as "open box". They'd just use one or two. This doesn't make sense to me.
  • -1 Hide
    bin1127 , March 30, 2011 10:54 PM
    but nvidia nerfed their supposedly flagship dual gpu card so they can drum about how quiet it is. burning down your apartment is what Nvidia is all about. They have the reputation of being super hot. Don't be ashame of it, give us a faster card!
  • -1 Hide
    dragonsqrrl , March 30, 2011 11:06 PM
    zkevwluI was thinking about buying one of these, but when I went to the store to pick it up the sales rep told me 7 of these cards caught on fire when they were benched. Needless to say I got scared off. Can anyone confirm this?

    hunter315They arent catching on fire, but they do have abnormally high failure rates for a fresh release, their newest drivers decreased its OCP set point to keep the card safer and reduce the number that blow their VRMs like this onehttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sRo [...] r_embeddedI dont think that them selling out is noteworthy, i think its a sign of low supply and possibly a reduction in supply until they get the blowing up thingy figured out

    Like hunter315 wrote, no, the GTX590 doesn't catch on fire. I'm not sure what sales rep you spoke to at which store (...Best Buy?), but in general they aren't the most reliable source for tech advice of this nature.

    However it should also be noted that in the cases where people have bricked their cards as a result of blown VRM's, these cards were running at full load and at higher then reasonable voltages. So unless you plan on doing some extreme overclocking you have nothing to worry about.

    I'd just like to echo Chris's response to the linked "Geforce GTX 590 burns" video:
    "Anything goes up in flames if you're an idiot and overvolt it past the point of reason. Would it be so surprising if I blew up a Phenom II using 2V and then posted a video of it on the Internet? Is it really a coincidence that these guys were filming their benchmarks at the moment their card died? Don't fall for sensationalism."
  • -1 Hide
    memadmax , March 30, 2011 11:06 PM
    LOL @ the "Catch on fire" bit.

    First of all, that would be on the 5 o'clock news. Then on tom's hardware.

    But most importantly, the circuits would quit working from overheating long before ignition point would be reached. In other words it would quit working before it caught on fire. You would have lockups, and by the nature of a lockup, the card would stop processing, and in turn stop producing heat.

    Need I say more?

    The only other way I could see it happening is if a gross defect in the power structure was to manifest itself. Causing a short circuit. But again, the power supply would shutdown in that case. So you could have a few sparks, but certainly nothing to roast marshmallows with.
  • 0 Hide
    dragonsqrrl , March 30, 2011 11:09 PM
    aevmI don't think stores run benchmarks on video cards. Even if that one does, why would they do it with SEVEN cards or more? They lose money every time they open a card and have to sell it as "open box". They'd just use one or two. This doesn't make sense to me.

    ...lol, I don't think that's what he meant.
  • 0 Hide
    17seconds , March 30, 2011 11:10 PM
    Like with anything, performance depends on the game. Overall, the driver support favors the 590, which is good, given the initial hiccups both the 590 and 6990 have had.
  • 1 Hide
    17seconds , March 30, 2011 11:16 PM
    Oh, and I've been checking Bestbuy.com for the GTX 590, and they have never even listed it. So, how are they sold out of it? And no, they didn't have any stock in the stores either... in the Silicon Valley.
  • -3 Hide
    howiejcee , March 30, 2011 11:23 PM
    If I were to build a new PC right now, which I'm not since I'm waiting for Z68, I'd also buy this over the 6990.

    Reasons:
    Better drivers
    Lower noise
    Similar performance in general


    I don't mind paying a little more due to power consumption.
  • -1 Hide
    lp231 , March 30, 2011 11:48 PM
    Unless you're running at insane resolution, this card is a total waste.
    You can probably tell majority of the buyers has more money than brains and they buy it to run their games at 1024x768! :p 
  • 0 Hide
    Anonymous , March 30, 2011 11:52 PM
    Sold out is only relative to how many of something was on sale in the first place, so when it's not very many, selling out isn't much of an accomplishment. This is pretty much a puff-piece/turd-polishing-contest for an utter failure of a card, that Nvidia has no desire to sell in any kind of volume, since the warranty costs for failed cards is likely to eat any profit they're making off it.
  • 1 Hide
    mister g , March 30, 2011 11:53 PM
    JeanLucFor starters who's speculating? Where are you getting this information from? Sources? Links? Also for the record there are loads of 590's in Europe (just checkout OCUK, they have a lots of 590's still in stock) because IMO people outside of North America have to pay a higher price to off set the lower price consumers pay in the US (the typical price of 590 here is £600 where as the 6990 goes for about £515-£520). How else do explain away the fact the chips on the 590 are large and thus expensive to produce yet are retailing at a lower price then the 6990 which is cheaper to make (the die's are smaller).
    Again which reports are you referring to?
    Do you have any evidence of this? Sources, links?
    Can you please explain why a 12 layer 2oz PCB 10-phase power layout is impressive?
    Nice advert that holds no relevance at all the topic at hand.

    I also noted the advert that you were talking about, but going on a rant over everyting else is just wrong. Right under the authors name is the source: Softpedia in blue like Kevin's name. If you had noticed that and clicked on the link you would have found an article on softpedia that reported that the cards were sold out in the United States. In the article itself is another bold blue(unless color blind, than I don't know what color it appears to you) link that went to another softpedia article explaining the price Nvidia originally wanted for the 590. If you had the time to write out such a long response you most certainly could have used it reading the sources. For the record I don't know who Kevin Parrish is other than he's the author of this article, I just don't like bigoted comments.
  • 2 Hide
    johnners2981 , March 31, 2011 12:44 AM
    cheapest 590 is €667 and cheapest 6990 is €632 where I'm from, which is $940 and $891 respectively. Yeah we get screwed, no wonder they're still in stock
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