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Huawei Achieves 2Tbit/s for 2066 Miles Through Optical Fiber

By - Source: Huawei | B 34 comments

Huawei successfully tested optical fiber-based 2 Tbit/s transmissions over 2066 miles.

Last week Chinese telecoms equipment vendor Huawei said that it had successfully completed a field trial using optical fiber transmission technologies on Vodafone’s live network. The company claimed it reached 2 Tbit/s transmission capabilities over 3,325 km, or 2066.059 miles. This capacity is essentially twenty times higher than current commercially deployed 100 Gbit/s (100G) systems, Huawei said.

The field trial achieved a "record-breaking" transmission distance of 1500 km (932 miles) by using a super-channel PDM-16QAM-based high spectral efficiency solution. The company then broke another record by achieving a transmission distance of 3,325 km (2066 miles) using a super-channel Nyquist PDM-QPSK-based ultra-long-haul solution.

According to Huawei, both transmissions were on a link with G.652 fibers and erbium-doped fiber amplifiers (EDFAs) without electrical regeneration. The company added that the link used in the trial was on Vodafone's backbone network, passing through a few cities across middle and south Germany.

"We are at the forefront of global 100G deployments, and have taken the lead in delivering key breakthroughs in technologies beyond 100G. Through collaboration with Vodafone and other leading international operators and customer-centric R&D, Huawei is always ready to build advanced optical networks for customers," said Jack Wang, president of Huawei's transport network product line.

 

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  • 21 Hide
    lpedraja2002 , February 1, 2013 5:08 PM
    jn77China steals tech from the US and then actually develops it....... Broadband providers need to get their greedy heads out of their **** in the US Most countries have higher speed broadband than the US and the internet started in the US.


    Solution... boycott all ISP's and demand better speeds. You'll see how fast things move up. The thing is we can't live without the internet for a week so our weakness is their ultimate gain. ISP profits must be huge.
  • 13 Hide
    balister , February 1, 2013 5:45 PM
    mtcolley89The internet didn't really start in the U.S.A though. The 1st point to point network was in the U.S.A but the internet defiantly didn't start there. The internet was invented at CERN by Sir Tim Berners-Lee


    Wrong, the internet very much started in the US through DARPAnet which interconnected a number of military systems first and some universities before expanding. What Sir Tim did was come up with HTTP which increased the ability to browse the existing network more easily.
  • 12 Hide
    Anonymous , February 1, 2013 6:29 PM
    Internet and World Wide Web are often user synonymous, but they are not in fact. This causes confusion when discussing who invented what. DARPANET was the origin of the internet, but I would not say it was invented so much as that it "evolved", if you look at the amount of institutions and people involved.

    Bunch of smart people having computers in the early days and a common problem. Slow exchange of information, together they build a solution.

    About a decade before Arpanet there was already the first connection from one computer to another. So even ARPANET was not the first but they helped the evolution along quite a bit.

    Berners-Lee made browsing much more efficient with the protocols he developed, which led to what we consider as the World Wide Web today. Linking pages was a great aid for navigating the available information.

Other Comments
  • 3 Hide
    Parsian , February 1, 2013 4:58 PM
    oh dear China...
  • 12 Hide
    DRosencraft , February 1, 2013 5:02 PM
    Holy cow! That is mindbogglingly fast even for a test. I didn't think it'd be a while until Google fiber looked like small potatoes, but this about does it. The only sad part is that they aren't at the full-deployment stage yet.
  • 21 Hide
    lpedraja2002 , February 1, 2013 5:08 PM
    jn77China steals tech from the US and then actually develops it....... Broadband providers need to get their greedy heads out of their **** in the US Most countries have higher speed broadband than the US and the internet started in the US.


    Solution... boycott all ISP's and demand better speeds. You'll see how fast things move up. The thing is we can't live without the internet for a week so our weakness is their ultimate gain. ISP profits must be huge.
  • 5 Hide
    CaedenV , February 1, 2013 5:20 PM
    DRosencraftHoly cow! That is mindbogglingly fast even for a test. I didn't think it'd be a while until Google fiber looked like small potatoes, but this about does it. The only sad part is that they aren't at the full-deployment stage yet.

    There is a difference between enduser bandwidth and backbone bandwidth. This would be a backbone solution to get data from hundreds of users in one area to hundreds of users in another area, it would not be 100Gb/s at your home.

    That being said, this is really good tech and needs to be implemented ASAP. While these new techs have a super high entry cost, the maintenance cost is quite cheap as it takes less power/cooling to run them, and less repeater stations to get stuff from point A to point B. Plus the added data density will allow backbone connections to use the same tunnels and trenches to do a whole lot more work.
  • 0 Hide
    mtcolley89 , February 1, 2013 5:25 PM
    jn77China steals tech from the US and then actually develops it....... Broadband providers need to get their greedy heads out of their **** in the US Most countries have higher speed broadband than the US and the internet started in the US.


    The internet didn't really start in the U.S.A though. The 1st point to point network was in the U.S.A but the internet defiantly didn't start there. The internet was invented at CERN by Sir Tim Berners-Lee
  • 1 Hide
    pbrigido , February 1, 2013 5:27 PM
    That second paragraph made my head hurt
  • 7 Hide
    icepick314 , February 1, 2013 5:37 PM
    lpedraja2002Solution... boycott all ISP's and demand better speeds. You'll see how fast things move up. The thing is we can't live without the internet for a week so our weakness is their ultimate gain. ISP profits must be huge.


    good luck boycotting when you're the only one without any internet service to your house...

    also doesn't help when they have monopoly on certain markets...

    until there is competition or Google Fiber is rolling in, you're just gonna have to get your bass taped...without any lubes...

    at least in my neighbor, there's choice between Comcast and Verizon...EVIL and LESSER EVIL...

    Google really needs to deploy their fiber network nationwide...that'll scare rest of the ISP in their pants....
  • 8 Hide
    joebob2000 , February 1, 2013 5:44 PM
    To put this in perspective, fiber over 2000 miles incurs a latency of about 16ms. 2 Tbit/s for 16ms is 32 gigabits, or about 4 gigabytes of data suspended *in* the fiber at any given moment. Crazy, or what?
  • 13 Hide
    balister , February 1, 2013 5:45 PM
    mtcolley89The internet didn't really start in the U.S.A though. The 1st point to point network was in the U.S.A but the internet defiantly didn't start there. The internet was invented at CERN by Sir Tim Berners-Lee


    Wrong, the internet very much started in the US through DARPAnet which interconnected a number of military systems first and some universities before expanding. What Sir Tim did was come up with HTTP which increased the ability to browse the existing network more easily.
  • -9 Hide
    therogerwilco , February 1, 2013 5:53 PM
    Ya this is pretty bogus, I'm within 2,000 miles of the nearest fiber and I still only get 20Mbps??!!!
  • -3 Hide
    mtcolley89 , February 1, 2013 5:57 PM
    Well no. What America did was network a lot of military computers together. What Berners-lee did was invent the www. I think you'll find he is accredited with the invention with pretty much every scientific community. But as usual America thinks they invented everything.
  • -2 Hide
    milktea , February 1, 2013 6:27 PM
    now we know where the wall street investment would go...
  • 12 Hide
    Anonymous , February 1, 2013 6:29 PM
    Internet and World Wide Web are often user synonymous, but they are not in fact. This causes confusion when discussing who invented what. DARPANET was the origin of the internet, but I would not say it was invented so much as that it "evolved", if you look at the amount of institutions and people involved.

    Bunch of smart people having computers in the early days and a common problem. Slow exchange of information, together they build a solution.

    About a decade before Arpanet there was already the first connection from one computer to another. So even ARPANET was not the first but they helped the evolution along quite a bit.

    Berners-Lee made browsing much more efficient with the protocols he developed, which led to what we consider as the World Wide Web today. Linking pages was a great aid for navigating the available information.

  • 1 Hide
    Anonymous , February 1, 2013 6:42 PM
    shame that companies are too tight with their servers to give us speeds to maximise our current connections
  • 7 Hide
    dalethepcman , February 1, 2013 7:01 PM
    mtcolley89Well no. What America did was network a lot of military computers together. What Berners-lee did was invent the www. I think you'll find he is accredited with the invention with pretty much every scientific community. But as usual America thinks they invented everything.


    Just because someone (who happens to be british) is touted as "the creator of the world wide web" during the 2012 London Olympic games, doesn't mean he "invented the internet." These are two completely difference things you are referring to.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tim_Berners-Lee : "He made a proposal for an information management system in March 1989,[3] and he implemented the first successful communication between a Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) client and server via the Internet sometime around mid November."

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_Internet : In 1982, the Internet protocol suite (TCP/IP) was standardized and the concept of a world-wide network of fully interconnected TCP/IP networks called the Internet was introduced.

    See a problem with the timeline? If they already had a protocol called Internet Protocol 7 years before Tim did his tests, how can he have created the Internet?

    World wide web yes, internet no.
  • 1 Hide
    blubbey , February 1, 2013 8:03 PM
    China in the next few decades looks like the place to be.
  • -1 Hide
    bunz_of_steel , February 1, 2013 10:11 PM
    I get 1800K download from cox. LOL. Hmmmm don't think I'll see any speed from this. Although 3rd world nations will eventually have better network infrastructure than U.S.
  • -3 Hide
    f-14 , February 1, 2013 10:29 PM
    jn77China steals tech from the US and then actually develops it....... Broadband providers need to get their greedy heads out of their **** in the US Most countries have higher speed broadband than the US and the internet started in the US.


    they don't necessarily steal it as american R&D is outsourced there due to cost/profit margins. i'm sure intel has a 4TB CPU but they are just sitting on it and milking the crowd rather than just producing and selling it

    fiber went main stream back in the 90's with sprint yet there is a ton of people still paying for wire transmission. unless there is a profit margin sustained by a demand, corporate executives see no reason to implement new tech. i believe streaming will change that structure thanks in part to HD signal transmission here in the states as it's already having a huge affect on the structure of the flow of money in the money tree. HD has already killed a huge part of the audience for t.v. media networks and thus affects the advertising sales while streaming is nothing but a boom of growth and revenue in all sectors. every telecom has it's eyes on google fiber, they already know what will happen, but shareholders control their actions and when shareholders start bailing telecoms for companies doing what google is doing, then they will act, it will probably be too late if they don't have the revenue, and i am sure the big telecoms are just waiting for that before they start. there's got to be alot of consolidation for telecoms to jump on this, like the too big to fail in the banking industry.

    the only thing that would change the power of innovation at this point would be regulations or deregulations by governments like how pot smoker slippery willy clintons democratic crew removed anti predatory regulations on the banking industry right after putting the entire banking industry on steroids on unqualified loan guarantees backed up by the government and FDIC. a scheme like that to increase demand and allow double/triple/quadruple dipping for any telecom such as was done for the banking industry would stagnate any change in the telecoms with out huge investment stakes by newer companies like google that grow based on demand/profit allow. netflix, hulu if they would follow googles example could become the new cable companies down the road if they would adopt and implement new tech like cable companies did back in the 70's and 80's.

    fiber is more expensive than wire in almost every way, but the rewards have to be worth more than the investment before it can be implemented and that takes demand. streaming is helping to create that demand and it will be interesting to see if CBS or FOX or NBC or ABC follow googles example or go the way of the dodo as their power/cash structure collapses around them as it is doing for the last few years.
  • 4 Hide
    esrever , February 1, 2013 11:38 PM
    blubbeyChina in the next few decades looks like the place to be.

    if you could actually breath the air there in a couple of years, it wouldn't be so bad.
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