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Chrome 17 Gets HTTP Pipelining

By - Source: Tom's Hardware US | B 20 comments

There is a new feature that has just popped up in the Webkit snapshot releases of future Chrome versions, also known as Chromium releases. Chromium 17 includes an HTTP Pipelining flag.

Google is a bit late to the party with this feature. Opera has had pipelining support since version 4 and Firefox has also included some customization freedom for users to adjust pipelining to alleviate the page load delays that are cause in high-latency situations.

Pipelining can be enabled via a flag in chrome://flags and will result in Chrome sending off multiple http requests before a response is received. The purpose is to shorten load times of pages especially on slow client-server systems. The improvement is very limited at this time and highly subjective. Google is unlikely to offer this feature for customization, but indicated that Chrome will automatically select the best number of pipelines. There is no proxy support and there is no way for the system to deal with servers that do not support pipelining or incorrectly implement pipelining. Google said that it will be fixing this feature in the future.

It is unclear when pipelining will be available by default. However, Chrome 17 is about 12 - 14 weeks from its final release and there is plenty of time to prep the feature. You can test drive pipelining in Chrome by downloading a recent Chromium snapshot. The feature is integrated in the browser in build versions 106364 and higher.

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  • 1 Hide
    Randomacts , October 21, 2011 6:06 AM
    Chrome 18 does your homework!!!...

    Seriously tho.. I wish they would do .01 ect updates for most of these updates
  • -1 Hide
    JOSHSKORN , October 21, 2011 7:36 AM
    RandomactsSeriously tho.. I wish they would do .01 ect updates for most of these updates

    I know. It annoys me that browser devs keep changing the version number but I can't see a bit of difference on the UI.
  • 1 Hide
    bennaye , October 21, 2011 8:04 AM
    RandomactsChrome 18 does your homework!!!...Seriously tho.. I wish they would do .01 ect updates for most of these updates


    I wistfully think Google does this to rub it into the faces of Mozilla. FF got canned by the community for their "rapid-release-schedule-with-nothing-much-changed" strategy, while Google's doing pretty much the same thing but with *much* less criticism.

    Why don't people heap it on Google as well?
  • -1 Hide
    izmanq , October 21, 2011 8:58 AM
    will this makes testing web service using chrome frustating, since chrome will send request before we click a link :|
  • 0 Hide
    nikorr , October 21, 2011 9:46 AM
    Only the time will tell.
  • 2 Hide
    Anonymous , October 21, 2011 10:22 AM
    Firefox and Opera already does that. But to answer your question - no. It sends nothing before you click a link.
  • 0 Hide
    randomizer , October 21, 2011 12:15 PM
    bennayeWhy don't people heap it on Google as well?

    Because most people see Google as a champion for the end user.
  • 1 Hide
    Anonymous , October 21, 2011 12:32 PM
    come on...because google dont use the version number for marketing unlike mozilla!

    I dont even know what version im running or downloading without the about google chrome
  • 1 Hide
    alidan , October 21, 2011 2:32 PM
    JOSHSKORNI know. It annoys me that browser devs keep changing the version number but I can't see a bit of difference on the UI.

    i wish microsoft was like this, you know, change the engine without changing the interface. i get use to how something works (everything pre vista) than it all gets changed for no real reason (win 7, cant speak for vista)
  • 0 Hide
    Anonymous , October 21, 2011 2:33 PM
    Will this mean that internet will no longer be stuck in series of tubes(aka pipes)?
    ;) 
  • 2 Hide
    solipsism , October 21, 2011 2:49 PM
    izmanqwill this makes testing web service using chrome frustating, since chrome will send request before we click a link :|


    That's not what HTTP pipelining means. Basically, if you have 10 CSS files all hosted on the same server, a pipelined browser will request all 10 through the same socket without waiting for the response to the first 9 before making the 10th request. It then reads each reply off the socket in order.

    Assuming a latency of N milliseconds, a non-pipelined HTTP/1.1 connection would save (9*N) milliseconds in this scenario. However, pipelining support in webservers isn't all that reliable - even with HTTP/1.1, a naive implementation of HTTP could end up mixing content from the requests together, so the hard part of the client implementation is error checking and fallback.
  • 0 Hide
    dotaloc , October 22, 2011 3:43 AM
    google de-emphasizes the number. since it auto-updates...and you don't even know the number unless you go out of your way, no-one cares.

    ...and, they've been rapid-release since inception. so who can complain...not like they 'jumped on board' after conventional released for a long time.
  • -1 Hide
    alidan , October 22, 2011 11:38 AM
    jacekringYou do realize you can make win 7 look almost EXACTLY like winXP if you want to right? Was the same thing with Vista, you could choose your theme and layout and make it look so close to a WinXP you'd be surprised.It's the MS Office that makes huge interface changes each release, and you have to re-learn how to write a document each release. That kinda blows, and their is no way to change the interface to look like previous versions of Office.


    i am looking into this, but i don't have the means to play around with the os yet, as both pcs we have are not mine with 7 on them. if i can get it exactly like xp, and i mean everything, i would get it, 2 new 2tb hdds, and a new motherboard for ddr3 and 16gb or ram. currently have a ddr2 build because i couldn't pay for new everything when my old pc died. had to make a new on out of the surviving parts.
  • 0 Hide
    Wish I Was Wealthy , October 22, 2011 3:06 PM
    This will be interesting to check out.
  • 0 Hide
    Wish I Was Wealthy , October 22, 2011 3:08 PM
    So far though I haven't been that well interested in Google's chrome ever since Mozilla's Aurora came out.
  • 1 Hide
    herdnruh , October 22, 2011 10:16 PM
    randomizerBecause most people see Google as a champion for the end user.


    Google doesn't put the version number out front & center. My wish is for all browsers to auto-update/prompt-to-update both the browser itself and its various extensions/plug-ins and have the capability to push-button enable/disable web features like java & flash, etc.
  • 0 Hide
    eddieroolz , October 24, 2011 10:56 PM
    Something like this is a .1 release to be honest.
  • 0 Hide
    Anonymous , November 6, 2011 1:05 AM
    All you have to do is type this in the target field of your Chrome shortcut-

    --enable-http-pipelining

    It works!
    For all things tech, visit my channel: youtube.com/supershamrock1234
  • 0 Hide
    titaniumsoldier , December 13, 2011 8:38 PM
    JOSHSKORNI know. It annoys me that browser devs keep changing the version number but I can't see a bit of difference on the UI.


    Who in the world cares about the UI? It could be a UI from the late 90s and it wouldn't matter very much. What matters is the stuff under the hood; the ability of the browser to properly translate HTML, CSS and Javascript into a user experience. Everything else is secondary.
  • 0 Hide
    titaniumsoldier , December 13, 2011 8:41 PM
    bennayeI wistfully think Google does this to rub it into the faces of Mozilla. FF got canned by the community for their "rapid-release-schedule-with-nothing-much-changed" strategy, while Google's doing pretty much the same thing but with *much* less criticism. Why don't people heap it on Google as well?


    Methinks you don't know much about the web and computer science.