G.Skill Brought Its Blazing Fast DDR4-4800 To Computex

G.Skill didn't only make good on its promise to bring DDR4-4500 to market this year--it upped the ante by announcing DDR4-4800 at Computex. The company showcased everything from a 32GB DDR4-3466 SO-DIMM memory kit (2 x 16GB) at CL 16 -18-18-43 timings all the way up to its Trident Z DDR4-4800 dual-channel desktop memory kit (2 x 8GB) at CL 19-19-19-39.

G.Skill gave its complete line of Trident Z RGB memory a speed boost starting at DDR4-3600 16GB kits (2 x 8GB) at CL 16-16-16-36 for AMD’s Ryzen-based platform, all the way up to DDR4-4400 16GB kits (2 x 8GB) at CL 19-19-19-39 for use with Intel’s new X-Series processors. There’s also a 64GB (8 x 8GB) DDR4-4400 at CL 19-21-21-41 available for X299 motherboard owners, too.


Those of you who are more interested in top speed versus RGB lighting functionality will be happy to know the company also had a Trident Z DDR4-4800 16GB kit (2 x 8GB) at CL 19-19-19-39 on display for use with Intel-based HED motherboards.

During an overclocking event held at the G.Skill booth in Taipei, one competitor even managed to set a DDR4 memory speed world record. Using the company's DDR4 memory built with Samsung 8Gb ICs, professional overclocker Toppc managed to hit DDR4-5500 speeds using liquid nitrogen cooling.

G.Skill’s booth at Computex featured a number of custom water-cooled systems, all running the aforementioned memory kits in a variety of configurations. Information on pricing and availability were not available at press time.

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  • the nerd 389
    It's too bad that Intel's new X-series uses thermal paste as the TIM. It really puts a damper on overclocking.

    On the S-series, you could get a few CPUs and take the risk of replacing the TIM. That's a lot less likely when the CPU costs $1000 (for the i9-7900X) to start with, and uses a much larger die.

    Still, it's good to know you can push RAM to DDR4-4800, even if the i9-7900X only goes to 4500 MHz on a good day.
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  • RomeoReject
    Everything I've read says that the new AMD stuff does better with fast memory. Would something like this help them even more? Or do we hit a certain point where added speed becomes pointless?
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  • JimmiG
    Anonymous said:
    Everything I've read says that the new AMD stuff does better with fast memory. Would something like this help them even more? Or do we hit a certain point where added speed becomes pointless?


    The highest speed divider that you can dial in on Ryzen is 4000 MHz, with AGESA 1.0.0.6. However I don't think anyone has achieved 4000 MHz with any stability.

    With the highest quality RAM modules and the most expensive motherboards, it seems 3466 MHz is about the limit of what you can achieve without encountering memory errors and stability issues. A small number of users might have achieved 3600 MHz, though I have to wonder whether that's completely stable running 24/7 stress tests (memory errors can take many hours of stress testing to manifest themselves).

    There are diminishing returns above 3200 MHz anyway so the sweet spot for Ryzen is still a good set of 3200 C14 sticks.
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