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Intel to Support Wireless Charging by 2014

By - Source: IDT | B 16 comments

You may be able to get rid of the last sets of cords for your notebook and phones within 2 years.

Intel confirmed that wireless charging will become available in the form of reference designs in early 2013 with full commercialization expected to take place in 2014. The initial set of targeted products will include Ultrabooks, all-in-one PCs, smartphones, and standalone chargers.

There are no details on specs and pricing, even if Intel's Dan Snyder notes that wireless charging times are similar to those of a USB cable setup. It is reasonable to assume that wireless chargers will command a noticeable premium over products cable chargers, even if the hardware production and assembly cost may be substantially lower. The article published by The Register suggests that details will be revealed next month at the fall Intel Developer Forum.

From Snyder's blog post:

"Imagine, for example, this wireless charging solution in an Ultrabook of the future. How would it work? You are low on juice on your phone — you simply start the WCT [wireless charging technology] detection software and place the smartphone close to your Ultrabook (about an inch or so). Coupling takes place between the two devices and energy begins to seamlessly and wirelessly flow from the Ultrabook to the smartphone. Within an hour, you have recharged your smartphone sufficiently to make it through the afternoon. No more wires or chargers."

Probably the best known wireless charging technology today is the Duracell Powermat, which is based on a charging case for phones as well as a charging surface a device needs to be placed on. Intel's wireless charging technology will be based on technology provided by IDT.

 

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  • 0 Hide
    trumpeter1994 , August 31, 2012 7:42 PM
    Quote:
    There are no details on specs and pricing, even if Intel's Dan Snyder notes that wireless charging times are similar to those of a USB cable setup

    I've yet to use wireless charging but it'd be nice to know if he was talking about USB 2.0 port or something like one of the high-powered USB 3.0 ports.
  • 2 Hide
    freggo , August 31, 2012 7:50 PM
    Would be nice if they can also be used with wireless mice and keyboards !
    My mouse is going thru a battery a week and you know the darn thing always dies at the most inopportune moment giving Murphy that grin of satisfaction :-)
  • 1 Hide
    sheepsnowadays , August 31, 2012 7:57 PM
    "It is reasonable to assume that wireless chargers will command a noticeable premium over products cable chargers, even if the hardware production and assembly cost may be substantially lower"
    Right on, a noticable price increase for something thats cheaper to make
  • 2 Hide
    basketcase87 , August 31, 2012 8:06 PM
    sheepsnowadays"It is reasonable to assume that wireless chargers will command a noticeable premium over products cable chargers, even if the hardware production and assembly cost may be substantially lower"Right on, a noticable price increase for something thats cheaper to make

    I somehow doubt the guys in Intel's R&D department work for free. They have to make their money back from developing the technology as well as cover costs of production.
  • 4 Hide
    adgjlsfhk , August 31, 2012 8:10 PM
    What is the use of more expensive wireless charging that only works within an inch of the charger? At that point using a less expensive device seems more convenient.
  • 7 Hide
    Chairman Ray , August 31, 2012 8:24 PM
    One step towards Tesla's 26 mile wireless power transmitter :) 
  • 0 Hide
    bctande1 , August 31, 2012 8:26 PM
    adgjlsfhkWhat is the use of more expensive wireless charging that only works within an inch of the charger? At that point using a less expensive device seems more convenient.


    I agree. I never quite got the NFC based charging technologies employed on current smartphones either.. Once you take the phone off the pad, it stops charging.. I don't see the flexibility in that 0__0 .. other than not having to worry about leaving a charger behind on a road trip or something.. Someone correct me if I'm wrong
  • 0 Hide
    JOSHSKORN , August 31, 2012 9:02 PM
    Maybe sometime after 2014 I can justify getting a laptop, then...if the keys are big enough. Laptops never excited me due to battery life.
  • 1 Hide
    thecolorblue , August 31, 2012 9:21 PM
    so much for energy efficiency appliances... wireless charging is abyssimally wasteful, and although the impact is miniscule for an individual, it will add up tremendously as hundreds of millions of phones, laptops, tablets etc. switch to this tech.

    >_
  • 3 Hide
    flips , August 31, 2012 9:30 PM
    I would still be using cables...
  • 5 Hide
    moogleslam , August 31, 2012 9:43 PM
    Hello to one more technology to give us cancer. Awesome.
  • 0 Hide
    kenyee , August 31, 2012 10:22 PM
    hah...I'd like to see them get this to work w/ my 170W thinkpad power brick :-P
  • 1 Hide
    oj88 , September 1, 2012 3:13 AM
    chairman ray :o ne step towards Tesla's 26 mile wireless power transmitter
    With the strength of Tesla wireless power, we wouldn't even need the battery and charger anymore, would we? I hope the day will come.
  • 2 Hide
    tomfreak , September 1, 2012 3:16 AM
    if it still involve with the power brick. It is not perfect, get it build into the battery.
  • -2 Hide
    IndignantSkeptic , September 1, 2012 5:05 AM
    Wait, you have to start the wireless charging detection software manually? Screw that. Get rid of that step; make it automatic or else it might be less hassle to just plug in the wires. Watch Apple try to patent that now.
  • 0 Hide
    webbwbb , September 1, 2012 3:52 PM
    When I first saw this, I thought it was talking about wirelessly chargine your laptop which seemed like a terrible idea. It would essentially be a directed energy weapon at that point...