Ryzen 9 7845HX Chip Appears in Gaming Benchmark

Zen 4 CPU
(Image credit: AMD)

A new mobile Ryzen 9 CPU might just have made its first appearance in a benchmark, bringing 12 Zen 4 (opens in new tab) cores to laptops for the first time. If it exists, that is. This is definitely a rumor, for now, coming as it does from hardware leaker Benchleaks’ Twitter account (opens in new tab).

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The purported AMD Ryzen 9 7845HX APU appears in a benchmark listing (opens in new tab) for Ashes of the Singularity: Escalation, a strategy videogame with a reputation for being hard on the processing cores. The rig appears to use the integrated Radeon GPU, has 8GB of RAM, and ran the game at 1080p under DirectX 11 with its graphics settings on ‘crazy,’ which is the level above ‘extreme.’ It averaged just over 50fps.

With 12 cores and 24 threads - appearing in the benchmark as 24 cores, as was the case with the 12-core 7900X - this is the first Ryzen HX processor to be equipped with more than eight cores. HX processors were added to AMD's range in the Ryzen 5000 generation and signify even greater performance than the ‘normal’ H series, which are high-performance mobile APUs. The mainstream mobile APUs get a U on the end of their name, while an M series chip is for low-power mobile.

Videocardz speculates that this could mean the Ryzen 9 7845HX is a repurposed desktop model, and it certainly could be a member of the Dragon Range (opens in new tab) family announced back in June. This makes it one of the first mobile chips to be identified using AMD's new naming convention (opens in new tab): the 7 at the beginning signifies 2022, the 8 is its market segment, and can confusingly mean it’s either a Ryzen 7 or 9 (though the CPU name is pretty clear). The 4 is for the Zen 4 architecture, and the 5 means it’s the upper model in its segment - a lower-class chip would have a 0 here.

Direct comparisons are hard to find, as most other benchmarks on the site show AMD HX chips from earlier generations running discrete GPUs, using DirectX 12 or Vulkan, or having their graphics options set completely differently. A 12-core Ryzen 9 5900X using the integrated GPU under Vulkan and with 32GB of RAM managed an average score of 112FPS, for example, suggesting DirectX 11 isn’t the best API to really show off the new chip's capabilities.

Ian Evenden
Freelance News Writer

Ian Evenden is a UK-based news writer for Tom’s Hardware US. He’ll write about anything, but stories about Raspberry Pi and DIY robots seem to find their way to him.

  • cyrusfox
    Mobile space starting to scale CPU cores? With AMD limiting to 8 cores now up to 12 cores vs Intel's 14/16 core efforts in Alder lake (ALD P 6P+8e & 8P/8E in ALD HX). Looking forward to understanding the efficiency/performance results. Apple still appears to be clear winner efficiency/performance as well as core counts with the M1 ultra (which you can't get in a laptop yet). The Ultra boast 16P/4e cores while M1 max tops out at 10 cores 8P/2e, original M1/M2 are only 4P/4e. Different strategy than Intel's where there are more e-cores than P cores.

    As cores scale to higher numbers, efficiency limits both throughput as well as mobile market penetration's. Looking forward to see how both AMD and Intel mobile CPUs fair against Apples efforts.
    Reply
  • artk2219
    cyrusfox said:
    Mobile space starting to scale CPU cores? With AMD limiting to 8 cores now up to 12 cores vs Intel's 14/16 core efforts in Alder lake (ALD P 6P+8e & 8P/8E in ALD HX). Looking forward to understanding the efficiency/performance results. Apple still appears to be clear winner efficiency/performance as well as core counts with the M1 ultra (which you can't get in a laptop yet). The Ultra boast 16P/4e cores while M1 max tops out at 10 cores 8P/2e, original M1/M2 are only 4P/4e. Different strategy than Intel's where there are more e-cores than P cores.

    As cores scale to higher numbers, efficiency limits both throughput as well as mobile market penetration's. Looking forward to see how both AMD and Intel mobile CPUs fair against Apples efforts.
    It's a bit of a moot point to compare it with Apples numbers other than as an academic excercise. For some people they may definitely care most about efficiency and battery life, but I'd be hard pressed to believe they're the majority of users. Not even taking into account the platform shift you would have to go through, pricing is still king, and I don't see these competing head to head on price in most settings. There's also use case, you're not likely to get a MacBook to game on, which is one place you'll see these chips heavily used as Apple currently has some issues on that front. Maybe on the mobile coding, content creation, or the engineering side there will be some overlap, but that brings in platform issues, honestly it turns into a use case issue all around. Now comparing AMD and Intel's latest chips, definitely, they're serving the same needs and market, they need to be compared.
    Reply
  • Alvar "Miles" Udell
    Videocardz
    speculates that this could mean the Ryzen 9 7845HX is a repurposed desktop model, and it certainly could be a member of the Dragon Range(opens in new tab) family announced back in June.

    Imagine that, Ryzen 7000 series sales are cratering, so AMD repurposes. No surprise.
    Reply
  • mitch074
    Alvar Miles Udell said:
    https://videocardz.com/newz/amd-ryzen-9-7845x-zen4-dragon-range-mobile-cpu-with-12-core-has-been-spotted
    Imagine that, Ryzen 7000 series sales are cratering, so AMD repurposes. No surprise.
    "Cratering" as "not able to sell their wares", or as "selling everything they produce as high-end stuff with crazy margins, thus unable and unwilling to cater to entry-level and mid-range" ? The former would be worrisome, the latter would have shareholders throwing money at AMD.
    Considering their Q3 2022 financial results, the latter is more likely.
    Reply
  • Eg0
    " A 12-core Ryzen 9 5900X using the integrated GPU..."

    ???
    Reply