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Dell Introduces World's First InfinityEdge Monitors And 30-inch OLED Monitor

Today at CES, Dell unveiled a slew of new UltraSharp monitors, which is its branding for its high-end pro-level color accurate displays. The star of the new lineup is the UP3017Q UltraSharp 30 Ultra HD 4K OLED monitor, the first Ultrasharp to use this kind of panel technology. In fact, OLED computer displays seem to be a theme this year at CES, with a number of other OEMs already announcing notebooks with OLED displays. Before we get into more details, we do want to say upfront that there is also one other significant aspect of the UP3017Q – its price. It’s an eye-watering $4,999! Yes, you read that right, five thousand dollars for a monitor. And people were complaining about the price of the Rift!

The two other UltraSharps announced are more traditional affairs. There are new 24- and 27-inch models that both use standard display tech and consequently cost a lot less. Both, however, use Dell’s InfinityEdge technology and thus have razor-thin bezels surrounding the panel, and both have 99% sRGB color coverage and come pre-calibrated out of the box. They are also available bundled with a monitor arm instead of a regular monitor stand, which according to Dell maximizes your “workspace and productivity.”

Dell UltraSharp 30 Ultra HD 4K OLED Monitor with PremierColor (UP3017Q)

We were able to see all these models at a recent briefing, and the 30-inch OLED model certainly has a stunning display. Nothing can compare to OLED when it comes to black reproduction, and colors almost seem to leap off the screen at you, as you can see in the image at the top of this post. OLED displays also cover a wide gamut of colors, and the UP3017Q is 100% AdobeRGB with 1.07 billion color depth, and as a PremierColor monitor, it is factory calibrated. OLED panels have incredibly fast response times -- 0.1 ms for this monitor -- and have superior grayscale performance and less motion blur than LCDs. OLED panels are also thinner, so the UP3017Q is a very slim display.

Specifications

Model numberUP3017Q
Diagonal size/resolution30”/Ultra HD 4K 3840 x 2160
Panel technologyOLED
Color depth1.07 billion
Color gamut100% AdobeRGB, 97.8% DCI-P3
Contrast ratio (typical)400,000:1
Response time0.1 ms
ConnectivityUSB Type-C with power delivery (Thunderbolt 3)

The UP3017Q does not have the super InfinityEdge bezels of the other models, but they are still narrow, and it is available with either a monitor arm or traditional stand. Its connectivity options were not elaborated on at this time, but it does use USB Type-C, and we were shown it connected to Dell’s new Thunderbolt Dock, so clearly Thunderbolt 3 tech plays a part here.

One issue that affects OLED display is burn-in (you may remember this from the days of Plasma TVs), so Dell has “incorporated a pixel shifting algorithm to prevent image burn-in.” OLED panels also have a shorter lifespan than LCDs, so the UP3017Q has a presence sensor feature that extends panel life by automatically turning off the monitor when you're not using it.

At $4,999 who is this monitor for? Certainly not the average PC enthusiast – at this price it is strictly aimed at creative professionals in content creation industries who work on “color-critical projects.” The UP3017Q will be available March 31, 2016.

Dell UltraSharp 24 And 27 InfinityEdge Monitors (U2717DA/ U2417HA)

After the preceding excitement about a $5,000 OLED monitor, the two other UltraSharps are positively pedestrian in their features and specification -- other than the InfinityEdge technology. This does significantly reduce the bezel size to where they are almost invisible, which will benefit multi-display setups immensely. Even though they are both LCD displays, they are color accurate and have 99% sRGB color coverage at deltaE<2 right out of the box.

 Specifications

Model numberU2717DAU2417HA
Diagonal size/resolution27”/QHD 2560 x 1440 @ 60 Hz23.8”/Full HD 1920 x 1080 @ 60 Hz
Color gamut99% sRGB at deltaE<299% sRGB at deltaE<2
DesignThin borders 7.3 mm (left, top, right), 8.3 mm (bottom)Super thin borders 5.3 mm (left, top, right), 8.3mm (bottom)
ConnectivityHDMI 1.4 (MHL 2.0), DP 1.2, mini-DP 1.2, DP-out, USB 3.0 x 4, Audio line-outHDMI 1.4 (MHL 2.0), DP 1.2, mini-DP 1.2, DP-out,USB 3.0 x 4, Audio line-out
ExtrasZero bright pixel promise with Premium Panel GuaranteeZero bright pixel promise with Premium Panel Guarantee

The main difference you can see then between these two models is the screen size and respective resolution. Other than that, they are basically the same, with similar connectivity and the option to buy them with a stand or monitor arm to free up desk space.

The Dell UltraSharp 24 InfinityEdge monitor will be available February 25, 2016, starting at $349, and the 27-inch InfinityEdge monitor will be available February 25, 2016, starting at $719.

Update: 01/06/16 1:50 PM PT: Availability date for UltraSharp 24 InfinityEdge monitor corrected.

Alex Davies is an Associate Contributing Writer for Tom's Hardware and Tom's IT Pro, covering Smartphones, Tablets, and Virtual Reality. You can follow him on Twitter. Follow Tom's Hardware on Twitter, Facebook, and Google+.

  • Matt_550
    $349 for a 24" 1080 @ 60hz..... Are they for real?
    Reply
  • indsup
    How can they call that infinity edge when there's other monitors out there that have smaller bezels than that? Looks like a marketing ploy/hype to me.
    Reply
  • XGShortbus
    Doesn't LG make some infinity edge devices?
    Reply
  • Uri___Pisarev
    Well i just got a Dell U3415W for $700, so i was hoping i would be set for MINIMUM of 5 years, but it looks like i am behind yet again.
    Reply
  • Quixit
    How can they call that infinity edge when there's other monitors out there that have smaller bezels than that? Looks like a marketing ploy/hype to me.

    Name one.
    Reply
  • eklipz330
    not worse than Asus's "zero-edge" display.
    Reply
  • DrakeFS
    How can they call that infinity edge when there's other monitors out there that have smaller bezels than that? Looks like a marketing ploy/hype to me.

    Name one.

    Please do, because when I find a 4k (hell maybe 1440p) bezelless monitor with g-sync (1ms response time of course), I am going to pull the trigger and buy 2. Seriously, why is it so hard to find a monitor with nearly no bezel?
    Reply
  • biggestinsect
    Would be nice if you could buy the panels with no stands. Save some money, less packaging. I have used the same arms for years and have a closet full of monitor stands I haven't thrown out.
    Reply
  • sillynilly
    For all you no bezel people - how would the panel be mounted? How would it be kept in place? Moreover, since the panels need lighting there is always an edge to a panel since the panel itself is only one part of a multilayer system. So what is your brilliant idea on how to keep the sandwich together with no edge and yet still protect the edge?

    Dismantle your current LED panel and see for yourself.

    Just making a point since having a complete bezel-less design is a lot more complicated than it seems many people understand.
    Reply
  • clonazepam
    Nothing can compare to OLED when it comes to black reproduction, and colors almost seem to leap off the screen at you, as you can see in the image at the top of this post.

    My TN panel and I will have to take your word for it. Good one! :D
    Reply