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Liquid Cooling On A PSU? FSP Will Release One At Computex 2017

FSP, among others, is going to show off a liquid-cooled PSU next week at Computex. The Hydro PTM+ was created in collaboration with Bitspower, a well-known company in liquid cooling solutions for PC systems.

This isn't the first time we've seen a liquid-cooled PSU. DeepCool showed off a prototype liquid-cooled PSU during Computex 2016, although it seems that it won't make it to mass production. Some years ago, Koolance actually released a water-cooled PSU (model number: PSU-1300ATX-12N), but it ultimately wasn't successful because of its huge price tag. Back in 2001, Koolance was also the first company to offer a water-cooled PSU. It was self-contained, meaning that it could work independently without the need for other water cooling parts, as opposed to the PSU-1300ATX-12N unit, which required an existing Koolance water cooling system.

Thus, although FSP isn't actually the first company to offer a liquid-cooled PSU, the Hydro PTM+ will definitely be the first mass-produced PSU of its kind. FSP is a major PSU OEM with increased manufacturing capacity.

FSP didn't release much information on this unit, unfortunately--it's just a tease before the full unveiling at Computex. At that time, we'll certainly learn more about price, availability, power specs, and so on. What we do know now is that the Hydro PTM+ will be 80 PLUS Platinum certified, it features LED lighting, and its liquid-cooling system will provide a boost only to the PSU's capacity, allowing it to reach 1.4kW from the 1.2kW nominal capacity.

The Hydro PTM+ looks to integrate a silent mode that allows the delivery of half of the PSU's normal capacity (600W) without employing the cooling fan; thus, the PSU will remain completely silent in this mode.

As you can suss out from the PSU's photo, it employs a normal cooling fan; the liquid-cooling system is used only to enhance the cooling capacity to enable the 200W power output increase. Therefore, contrary to the older Koolance PSUs that used only water cooling, the new Hydro PTM+ utilizes a hybrid solution, with the liquid-cooling part playing a secondary role.

To be frank, we're not sure this is particularly compelling, and in our opinion, if the price of this unit is too high, we don't believe that it will have enough sales volume to cover its design and production cost. Even so, it will certainly raise FSP's profile because it's a product that doesn't follow the standard guidelines and enthusiasts something more for those who are willing to pay for it.

  • ssdpro
    I think a nice brass case badge should be bundled that just says "DORK".
    Reply
  • JamesSneed
    I cant see them selling many of these. A leak in this would sure to be fun times.
    Reply
  • Glock24
    This is silly, a properly designed and efficient PSU generates little waste heat and is silent, even under load. This seems like a marketing trick for the all water-cooled crowd.
    Reply
  • Aris_Mp
    As far as I can tell they use a non-conductive liquid, so this is why they call it liquid-cooling and not water cooling. Koolance used a hybrid liquid/water cooling in its PSUs back in the day as well. It is way too risky to use water at the internals of a PSU but they are liquids which are non-conductive.

    Waiting for a sample of it and see how it goes under real life conditions.
    Reply
  • JamesSneed
    19727228 said:
    This is silly, a properly designed and efficient PSU generates little waste heat and is silent, even under load. This seems like a marketing trick for the all water-cooled crowd.

    Yeah. They will sell like 50 of these to build showroom type PC's and that's really it. With Platinum or Titanium rated PSU's you really don't have much need for more cooling.
    Reply
  • JamesSneed
    19727242 said:
    As far as I can tell they use a non-conductive liquid, so this is why they call it liquid-cooling and not water cooling. Koolance used a hybrid liquid/water cooling in its PSUs back in the day as well. It is way too risky to use water at the internals of a PSU but they are liquids which are non-conductive.

    Waiting for a sample of it and see how it goes under real life conditions.

    I hear you, figured they would. Only problem is this isn't sealed has a fan so will get dirty over time. Im guessing all that contamination would probably make a leak suck pretty bad inside of a PSU. Maybe Im wrong would love to see a test of that(dust /dirt plus liquid pored into the PSU) for science, lol or just to blow up a PSU.
    Reply
  • 10tacle
    Gimpy idea if I ever heard of one. The only time PSUs ever run into thermal and wattage output problems is when they are cheap and don't run at full wattage past a certain temp. What's next? Water cooling a dedicated sound card?
    Reply
  • joz
    Heh, a Water cooled sound card.

    The Asus Xonar DXH2O?

    The Creative SoundBlaster Hydro?


    What's next? A water cooled RAID card?
    Reply
  • Woot-Zee
    Water cooled cooler! BAM ...the bearings are water cooled.
    Reply
  • bit_user
    we needz moar water-cooled monitorz. lol.

    Now, water cooling a VR HMD might not be so crazy, but would obviously require some sort of belt pack.
    Reply