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In Pictures: Four ATX Cases Perfect For High-Capacity Water Cooling

Hidden Ports

The Switch 810’s front-panel ports really are on its front panel, hidden behind a flip-back cover. NZXT adds an SD card reader to the expected assortment of USB 2.0, USB 3.0, microphone, and headphone connections.

Double-Radiator Support

Two slide-out dust filters cover the Switch 810's entire bottom panel. The front dust cover protects two intake fan mounts with optional radiator capability.

Viewable from this angle through the side panel, the top panel supports our intended three-fan radiator.

Easier Access

Push latches secure key portions of the NZXT Switch 810’s front and top panels, along with its two bottom dust filters. A single 140 mm fan fills one of its two front mounts, its filter attached to the push-latched portion of the front panel.

Behind The Switch 810

Nine expansion slots support motherboards up to XL-ATX, though standoffs exist only for boards up to Extended ATX. XL-ATX users might also be confounded by the lack of a tenth slot to hold their fourth double-slot graphics card.

A quartet of grommets protect the lines of external liquid coolers, and the single 140 mm rear exhaust fan slides up and down to make room for various radiator configurations.

Horizontal Blinds

The NZXT Switch 810 gives you the ability to open and close top-panel vents for the sake of appearance. NZXT also mentions that the closed panel reduces noise, though closed-panel ventilation is only completely adequate for a single fan.

Switch 810 Cable Management

Ten large, rectangular grommets dress cable access holes of the NZXT Switch 810, which barely has enough room for a 24-pin power cable. A great amount of builder’s effort will pay off in the form of a clean-looking installation.

A pair of three-bay drive cages are also accessed from the right side. All six trays support both 2.5” and 3.5” drives.

Division Of Power

The Switch 810 doesn’t have its own fan controller, but it does have a large fan power splitter. A single four-pin power supply input feeds seven fan headers, with voltage control for the fan speed left to user-added modifications (such as splicing a rheostat into a four-pin extension cable).

Inside The Switch 810

The NZXT Switch 810’s impressive 3.2” of radiator mounting space is matched only by Aerocool's enormous competing chassis in today's photo line-up, allowing nearly any single radiator and some stacked configurations to fit. Independently-removable hard drive cages easily allow the case's bottom to accept a smaller (two-fan) secondary radiator.

Each drive cage supports an extra (internal) fan for push-pull ventilation. Each internal fan bracket can be rotated up to 15° to aid graphics card cooling, but only one fan is included.

Additional Configurability

The Switch 810’s backplane beats at least two of its competitors by supporting both 3.5” and 2.5” drives, thanks to a drive tray with two sets of holes. This standard 5.25” bay adapter can also be exchanged for a single optical drive or other 5.25” bay device.

Side panels of the top external bay are also removable to assist in top-panel radiator installation.

Now that most of the features for our liquid-cooling cases have been covered, we’re ready to move on to our performance evaluation. Please watch for it!

Thomas Soderstrom is a Senior Staff Editor at Tom's Hardware US. He tests and reviews cases, cooling, memory and motherboards.
  • hellfire24
    Cosmos II is a dream case!but it's very expensive for me :(
    Azza Hurricane 2000 is an excellent case.a friend of mine runs a 965 EE and 6970 Xfire and it runs very cool.
    Star of the Show was NZXT Switch 810!!!:D
    plenty of features for a reasonable price!
    hell better than my armour+
    it's time to collect some bucks lolll!! ;)
    Reply
  • aliened
    With the exception of the NZXT, every single one of them is ugly as hell...
    Reply
  • hellfire24
    Cosmos II is a beauty!
    Reply
  • greenrider02
    What a teeeeaaaaaase show me the liquid systems! Want the NZXT
    Reply
  • I like how the Cosmos II has door hinges. It reminded me when i was young child thinking about how cars could fly by just flapping the doors.
    Reply
  • What about the Haf-X? That's one of the highest rated cases on the market! It's affordable, plenty of space, and it can fit a triple radiator!
    Reply
  • LongpastPNR
    Water Cooling = just another way to waste hard earned income but I will stick to air thank you it is all around us and abundant no need for scarscity LOL.
    Reply
  • CaedenV
    LongpastPNRWater Cooling = just another way to waste hard earned income but I will stick to air thank you it is all around us and abundant no need for scarscity LOL.Agreed! I use to want a water cooled system so badly, until I realized how effective mass amounts of copper can be! If done right it is just as quiet, just as heavy, just as effective, but much less cost!

    there is a little kid in me that still wants to do the mineral oil PC though... but maybe I will do it with my kid some day :)
    Reply
  • Crashman
    crabmanWhat about the Haf-X? That's one of the highest rated cases on the market! It's affordable, plenty of space, and it can fit a triple radiator!Cooler Master chose the Cosmos II instead, probably because there's more promotional value in new products :)
    Reply
  • hellfire24
    @LongPNR and caedenv-
    watercooling is not just a solution.it's a hobby!
    if you don'twant then don't do it.stay on air but don't call it a waste :non: .
    remember,i agree we can achieve overclocks on air but it can never match an enthusiast's liquid cooling setup! :sarcastic:
    Reply