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AMD A10-7850K And A8-7600: Kaveri Gives Us A Taste Of HSA

Results: Synthetics

Sorted by 3DMark score, Intel’s Core i5-4670K takes first place. But it appears that’s only the result of a winning Physics sub-test result. Intel’s four physical cores outperforming AMD’s two Steamroller modules really should come as no surprise. More significant is the Graphics number, which puts four AMD APU configurations ahead of Intel's HD Graphics 4600 engine.

The latest version of PCMark is quite a bit different from previous Futuremark benchmarks. It’s broken down into three separate suites, including Home, Creative, and Work. Each has a collection of workloads (for example, the Home test emphasizes Web browsing, writing, casual gaming, photo editing, and video chatting). Moreover, the Home and Creative benchmarks can be run with or without OpenCL acceleration. Oddly, our A8-6500T couldn’t get through either without crashing, so its lower numbers had to be run using the Conventional setting.

Likely as a result of its strong graphics engine, the A10-7850K secures wins in the Home, Creative, and Work tests (though we wouldn’t expect a CPU-only Work run to favor AMD).

The A8-7600 in its 65 W configuration fares pretty well against AMD’s 100 W A10-6800K. Given a slightly lower price tag, that’d likely become an attractive option for comparable performance in a lower-power machine.

We’ll refrain from drawing sweeping conclusions about AMD’s showing against Intel in a synthetic benchmark. However, the Kaveri-based APUs easily slip past Intel’s $140 Core i3-4330. In most cases, they also do really well versus the pricier Core i5.

  • vipervoid1
    Somethings with Diagram u provided at page 9 ~ Core i5 4760k @@Please fix that ~
    Reply
  • Someone Somewhere
    Yeah, almost all the diagrams refer to the 4760K.

    Given that AM3+ looks like it's done, it would have been nice to see a 6-core chip. Still, one of these may end up in my next laptop.
    Reply
  • cangelini
    Will get the charts fixed shortly--thanks for the catch!
    Reply
  • spp85
    A10-7850k is slower than A10-6800K ?? WTF. Its all hype than actual performance to the table. Even on OpenCL GPU accelerated apps doesn't have any advantage with A10-7850k over i5 or sometimes i3 CPUs. Hopeless is what I feel about AMD CPUs.
    Reply
  • Someone Somewhere
    12454254 said:
    A10-7850k is slower than A10-6800K ?? WTF.

    I got the opposite impression. Which graph are you looking at?
    Reply
  • Jaroslav Jandek
    Thank you for the article (especially the power consumption measurements), Chris. It is definitely an improvement over Richland but kind of boring (disappointingly expectable).

    I really like where AMD is going (HSA, GCN and TrueAudio).Too bad the manufacturing process of GlobalFoundries just can't match Intel's.

    Also, it would be interesting to see the new Bay Trail Pentium or Celeron CPUs (whichever is closer in performance) in the Efficiency graphs.
    Reply
  • Someone Somewhere
    I'm fairly sure that this is on TSMC's 28nm node. GlobalFoundries can't do that yet; this is on the same process used for AMD GPUs currently.
    Reply
  • Jaroslav Jandek
    12454280 said:
    I'm fairly sure that this is on TSMC's 28nm node. GlobalFoundries can't do that yet; this is on the same process used for AMD GPUs currently.
    28nm SHP from GlobalFoundries. AMD bought over $1 billion worth of wafers from them in december...

    I guess you have been reading the articles from a year ago about AMD still using TSMC despite promises of GlobalFoundries' new 28nm SHP process.
    Reply
  • jacobian
    I don't really believe into the whole HSA smoke-screen. By the time HSA-enabled apps take off, you will be ready to upgrade from your CPU again. The one terrible truth that stands out right now is that at current prices, the flagship Kaveri A10 doesn't make any sense whatsoever. Kaveri A8? Maybe. Richland A10-6790K? Perhaps. But the Kaveri A10 at $180 is a just a joke, specially after all that hype.
    Reply
  • Someone Somewhere
    CPUs are usually released at ridiculous prices, and come down over a month or two.
    Reply