Alienware AW2524HF 500 Hz Gaming Monitor Review: Exotic Speed and Response

Alienware’s AW2524HF is a 25-inch FHD IPS gaming monitor with 500 Hz, Adaptive-Sync and HDR.

Alienware AW2524HF
Editor's Choice
(Image: © Tom's Hardware)

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Uncalibrated – Maximum Backlight Level

The AW2524HF is a very bright monitor. Concentrating 400 nits onto a small 25-inch screen creates a more intense image than the same light level spread over a larger panel. In competition, this will help the image compete with bright venue lighting.

The AW2524HF has decent contrast for IPS with a respectable black level and a ratio of 1,220.4:1. The picture has plenty of depth and texture that belies its FHD resolution.

After Calibration to 200 nits

I made a choice when calibrating to lower the contrast slider by five clicks to solve a slight color clipping issue. Though the contrast ratio has now dropped to 930.9, I could see a tad more detail in bright highlights. This is a compromise to solve a tiny issue, so if you’d rather keep the ratio above 1,200:1, just stick with the AW2524HF’s default settings. These are slight differences.

I ran the ANSI test using the same lowered contrast setting, so even though it isn’t impressive at 901.6:1, it is consistent. If you don’t calibrate, the ratio will be around 1,000:1

Test Takeaway: OLED is the way to go if you want maximum contrast. IPS panels have their positives, but dynamic range is not one of them. The AW2524HF delivers competent performance in this area, and its numbers can be forgiven when considering that it is built for speed over other considerations.

MORE: Best Gaming Monitors

MORE: How We Test PC Monitors

MORE: How to Buy a PC Monitor

MORE: How to Choose the Best HDR Monitor

Christian Eberle
Contributing Editor

Christian Eberle is a Contributing Editor for Tom's Hardware US. He's a veteran reviewer of A/V equipment, specializing in monitors.

  • Sluggotg
    When the early First Person Shooters showed up, (Doom, Rise of the Triad, Descent etc.), 10 FPS was considered playable. 24 FPS was thought to be perfect because that is the Frame Rate of Film. Then the hardware caught up and we saw what 60 FPS looked like. That was a "Game Changer", (Pun intended).

    I love a high frame rates. 144 FPS is great. Do I need 500 FPS, not likely, but I do want to try it. My only complaint is the size. I wish it was bigger.
    Reply
  • Kamen Rider Blade
    My main issue is that it's using IPS for 500 Hz VRR.

    IPS doesn't have the pixel reaction time to support 500 Hz w/o ghosting.

    It's not like OLED or classic CRT.

    Yes, you can OC the panel to support it, but there will be issues with it.
    Reply
  • Sleepy_Hollowed
    Kamen Rider Blade said:
    My main issue is that it's using IPS for 500 Hz VRR.

    IPS doesn't have the pixel reaction time to support 500 Hz w/o ghosting.

    It's not like OLED or classic CRT.

    Yes, you can OC the panel to support it, but there will be issues with it.
    I don't know about 500 Hz, but it works pretty good up to 160 Hz, no ghosting.

    I'd imagine that's imperceptible at those refresh rates, but I'd have to see it in person.
    Reply
  • UnforcedERROR
    Sluggotg said:
    My only complaint is the size. I wish it was bigger.

    Whose Line is it Anyway moment: Comments your girlfriend might say about you or your TV.

    Joking aside, 25" at 1080p is about all you'd ever want, really. Unless you're gaming at a considerable difference, I'd never personally recommend a monitor larger than 25" if it's 1080p, because the pixel density is pretty low up close. I mean, the 500hz is because it's at 1080p, and this is mostly for diehard FPS players, but I'd still prefer lower refresh for higher pixel density.
    Reply