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EVGA SuperNOVA 750 G5 Power Supply Review

The SuperNOVA 750 G5 is fully modular, compact, and promises for high performance. Will it be able to meet the popular Corsair and Seasonic offerings though?

Advanced Transient Response Tests

For details about our transient response testing, please click here.

In the real world, power supplies are always working with loads that change. It's of immense importance, then, for the PSU to keep its rails within the ATX specification's defined ranges. The smaller the deviations, the more stable your PC will be with less stress applied to its components. 

We should note that the ATX spec requires capacitive loading during the transient rests, but in our methodology, we also choose to apply a worst case scenario with no additional capacitance on the rails. 

Advanced Transient Response at 20% – 200ms

VoltageBeforeAfterChangePass/Fail
12V12.078V11.949V1.07%Pass
5V4.927V4.809V2.39%Pass
3.3V3.309V3.141V5.08%Pass
5VSB4.902V4.857V0.92%Pass

Advanced Transient Response at 20% – 20ms

VoltageBeforeAfterChangePass/Fail
12V12.079V11.904V1.45%Pass
5V4.931V4.791V2.84%Pass
3.3V3.309V3.108V6.07%Fail
5VSB4.907V4.836V1.45%Pass

Advanced Transient Response at 20% – 1ms

VoltageBeforeAfterChangePass/Fail
12V12.078V11.962V0.96%Pass
5V4.931V4.790V2.86%Pass
3.3V3.309V3.100V6.32%Fail
5VSB4.906V4.806V2.04%Pass

Advanced Transient Response at 50% – 200ms

VoltageBeforeAfterChangePass/Fail
12V12.065V11.937V1.06%Pass
5V4.923V4.806V2.38%Pass
3.3V3.304V3.138V5.02%Fail
5VSB4.887V4.836V1.04%Pass

Advanced Transient Response at 50% – 20ms

VoltageBeforeAfterChangePass/Fail
12V12.065V11.873V1.59%Pass
5V4.923V4.782V2.86%Pass
3.3V3.304V3.104V6.05%Fail
5VSB4.886V4.788V2.01%Pass

Advanced Transient Response at 50% – 1ms

VoltageBeforeAfterChangePass/Fail
12V12.065V11.942V1.02%Pass
5V4.923V4.786V2.78%Pass
3.3V3.304V3.098V6.23%Fail
5VSB4.884V4.786V2.01%Pass
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The 3.3V rail's performance is disappointing. The +12V rail should also stay within 1% in all tests.

Turn-On Transient Tests

In the next set of tests, we measure the PSU's response in simpler transient load scenarios—during its power-on phase. Ideally, we don't want to see any voltage overshoots or spikes since those put a lot of stress on the DC-DC converters of installed components.

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A small voltage overshoot at 5VSB, which is nothing to worry about.

Power Supply Timing Tests

There are several signals generated by the power supply, which need to be within specified, by the ATX spec, ranges. If they are not, there can be compatibility issues with other system parts, especially mainboards. From year 2020, the PSU's Power-on time (T1) has to be lower than 150ms and the PWR_OK delay (T3) from 100 to 150ms.

T1 (Power-on time) & T3 (PWR_OK delay)
LoadT1T3
20%60ms294ms
50%68ms294ms

The PWR_OK delay is our of the 100-150ms region, so the PSU does not support the alternative sleep mode, which will be a requirement by the ATX v2.52 from 2020.

Ripple Measurements

Ripple represent the AC fluctuations (periodic) and noise (random) found in the PSU's DC rails. This phenomenon significantly decreases the capacitors' lifespan because it causes them to run hotter. A 10-degree Celsius increase can cut into a cap's useful life by 50%. Ripple also plays an important role in overall system stability, especially when overclocking is involved.

The ripple limits, according to the ATX specification, are 120mV (+12V) and 50mV (5V, 3.3V, and 5VSB).

Test12V5V3.3V5VSBPass/Fail
10% Load12.4 mV5.6 mV12.0 mV7.1 mVPass
20% Load10.0 mV6.0 mV12.2 mV7.1 mVPass
30% Load10.4 mV6.8 mV12.9 mV7.7 mVPass
40% Load13.7 mV7.1 mV14.1 mV8.1 mVPass
50% Load14.4 mV6.6 mV15.8 mV8.4 mVPass
60% Load15.7 mV6.9 mV16.8 mV8.8 mVPass
70% Load18.0 mV7.9 mV19.4 mV9.7 mVPass
80% Load18.3 mV8.8 mV22.2 mV9.9 mVPass
90% Load21.5 mV9.8 mV25.3 mV10.7 mVPass
100% Load25.4 mV13.8 mV35.2 mV18.8 mVPass
110% Load27.1 mV15.0 mV42.2 mV21.2 mVPass
Crossload 18.0 mV7.5 mV16.8 mV9.2 mVPass
Crossload 224.8 mV11.7 mV27.8 mV14.6 mVPass
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The ripple suppression is good on all rails but the 3.3V, where there is a large increase in the 100% and 110% load tests.

Ripple At Full Load

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Ripple At 110% Load

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Ripple At Cross-Load 1

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Ripple At Cross-Load 2

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EMC Pre-Compliance Testing – Average & Peak EMI Detector Results

Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) is the ability of a device to operate properly in its environment without disrupting the proper operation of other close-by devices.

Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) stands for the electromagnetic energy a device emits, and it can cause problems in other close-by devices if too high. For example, it can be the cause of increased static noise in your headphones or/and speakers.

No spurs exceed the limits.

MORE: Best Power Supplies

MORE: How We Test Power Supplies

MORE: All Power Supply Content

  • Dark Lord of Tech
    Not a Leadex platform , can't really compete with the others.
    Reply
  • Yuniel
    Hello Aris , you still recommened the g3 ? , beacuse aparently is in tier Tier D - Not recommended https://linustechtips.com/main/topic/1116640-psu-tier-list-40-rev-103/ , beacuse of OPP , the 850 g3 is good PSU for high end PC gaming ?
    Reply
  • mossberg
    Yuniel said:
    Hello Aris , you still recommened the g3 ? , beacuse aparently is in tier Tier D - Not recommended https://linustechtips.com/main/topic/1116640-psu-tier-list-40-rev-103/ , beacuse of OPP , the 850 g3 is good PSU for high end PC gaming ?

    That list is a joke.
    Reply
  • agentlaidlaw
    Yuniel said:
    Hello Aris , you still recommened the g3 ? , beacuse aparently is in tier Tier D - Not recommended https://linustechtips.com/main/topic/1116640-psu-tier-list-40-rev-103/ , beacuse of OPP , the 850 g3 is good PSU for high end PC gaming ?
    linus forums are spreading fear mongering. they use toms own reviews about the G3 series as their reasoning while simultaneously ignoring toms still recommendation for it IN THOSE SAME REVIEWS. they all of a sudden don't care about the authors opinion. they pick and choose what they want to hear and spread misinformation and instill paranoia and fear mongering into people. and also flat-out ignore jonnyguru reviews for it as well. while simultaneously using jonny's reviews for recommending other power supplies.

    do yourself a favor and ignore that dumb list. the guy who took control of it is going on a fear mongering spree and has admitted hes basing everything off his own opinion rather than facts. he doesn't like single rails and telling people single rails will blow up on them if you use them in units past 600 watts or so. he's not correcting users going around on that forum stating single rails don't support ocp / opp. he's spreading misinformation about a plethora of power supplies, hes ranking power supplies that are objectively worse over nitpicking stuff. like the g3 opp that's only a concern if you ARE ALREADY PUSHING THE POWER SUPPLY BEYOND ITS RATED SPEC NO MATTER WHAT EVEN WITH GOOD OPP YOU WILL STILL HAVE PROBLEMS IN THOSE SCENARIOS OVER TIME OF CONSTANT PUSHING OVER SPEC.

    sorry for my rant but linus power supply tier has been the worse thing to come about in the community.
    Reply
  • Dark Lord of Tech
    I never ever base my recommendations on a lame tier list.
    Reply
  • WigitMigit
    Could I download evga's software and adjust the fan curve to deal with the loud fan issue? Or does their software not work with the g5 lineup
    Reply
  • TJ Hooker
    WigitMigit said:
    Could I download evga's software and adjust the fan curve to deal with the loud fan issue? Or does their software not work with the g5 lineup
    What software are you referring to? I've never heard of software that lets you change your PSU fan profile, except for Corsair link (which only works with a few of their high end PSUs).
    Reply
  • WigitMigit
    TJ Hooker said:
    What software are you referring to? I've never heard of software that lets you change your PSU fan profile, except for Corsair link (which only works with a few of their high end PSUs).
    https://www.evga.com/supernova/
    Reply
  • TJ Hooker
    WigitMigit said:
    https://www.evga.com/supernova/
    Interesting, didn't realize EVGA had something similar. But it looks like it works only with that one PSU model from ~7 years ago, guess it's not too surprising I hadn't heard of it.
    Reply
  • VTEC_Inside
    There is an issue with this review IMO.

    Active Clamp Reset Forward designs characteristically hold steady voltages better.

    The criticism regarding transient response is flawed in that it is not tested the way that people are actually going to use the things, ie with the caps in place.

    While I'm sure no one is stamping an official seal of approval on PSUs, I'd imagine they'd be ripped on pretty hard if it didn't actually adhere to ATX specifications.

    Evga's marketing wank goes on about the higher quality capacitors on the output board. A more useful test, IMO, would be to test that transient response under conditions that people are actually using the thing. Given that it only slightly failed this testing methodology without the caps, I'm left to believe that it would do just fine tested in a real world situation.
    Reply