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SilverStone Strider Gold S V2 750W Review

SilverStone is the only company with so many compact PSUs in its portfolio. A while ago, it released the second version of the Strider Gold S with 750W of capacity.

Packaging, Contents, Exterior And Cabling

Packaging

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The package is small, since the PSU it accommodates is small as well. On the front is a three-quarter shot of the PSU with its modular panel exposed. The capacity description is given in the front-bottom side, and right above it is a brief list with the product's main features. The large 80 PLUS Gold icon resides in the front, bottom-right corner. On one of the sides of the box we find the power specifications table and the PSU's version. SilverStone is probably the only company that depicts this on its packaging, and we applaud the company for it. If you're looking for the second version of the ST75F-GS, you must check for a 2.0 on the box.

On another side of the box is a description of the included cables and connectors. Finally, around back, you'll find the supply's physical dimensions, its efficiency rating and overall performance. SilverStone also mentions its flat, stealth cables and low-noise 120mm fan.

Contents

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The PSU is only protected by bubble-wrap inside the box. Really, SilverStone should use some packing foam as well. The cardboard might be sturdy enough, but a couple of foam spacers would protect the supply from rough handling.

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The bundle includes four Velcro straps, several zip ties, two sets of fixing bolts and two informative manuals.

Exterior

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The fan isn't installed in the center of the PSU's top side, and we think that has a negative effect on its looks. However, it must be more effective for cooling sensitive components in this position. Up front, there's a small on/off switch installed next to the AC receptacle, and the power specification label is on one of the unit's sides.

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The modular PCB only hosts eight sockets, and we think it could expose a couple more (one of them being for a second EPS cable). Lots of screws are used on the back of the unit. Not only do they hold the modular PCB in place, but they also keep the rear panel attached to the chassis. Finally, the finish looks decent; its semi-matte texture makes it resistant to fingerprints.

Cabling

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The provided cables are stealth, flat and of good quality. We definitely prefer flat cables over round-shaped ones since they block less airflow inside the chassis. On top of that, you can route them more easily, simplifying cable management. Some of you might prefer individually sleeved cables. But they're much more expensive and it's harder to route them.

  • Eggz
    At first glance, I thought this was a 750 w in an SFS form factor. Womp! . . . Still seems like a decent PSU, though.
    Reply