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AMD Inadvertently Reveals Ryzen 7 3750X 105W CPU

AMD's latest Product Master guide reveals a never-before-seen Ryzen 3000-series (codename Matisse) processor. The chipmaker lists the previously unknown chip as the Ryzen 7 3750X.

AMD Ryzen 3000 Series

AMD Ryzen 3000 Series

(Image credit: AMD)

Despite being mentioned in an official AMD document, there is no assurance that the Ryzen 7 3750X will go beyond the drawing board. Honestly, AMD already has a pretty diverse Ryzen desktop portfolio, and we can't see how the Ryzen 7 3750X would fit into the product stack. The name alone suggests the chip will likely slot in between the Ryzen 7 3700X and Ryzen 7 3800X. The problem is that only a strand of hair separates both Ryzen 7 models, so there isn't much room for another chip.

The Ryzen 7 3700X and Ryzen 7 3800X come equipped with eight cores and 16 threads. Since the Ryzen 7 3750X sports the Ryzen 7 moniker, the processor would likely retain the same core and thread count.

ModelSEP (USD)Cores / ThreadsTDPBase / Boost Frequency (GHz)L3 CachePCIe 4.0 Lanes
Ryzen 7 3800X$3998 / 16105W3.9 / 4.53224
Ryzen 7 3750X?8 / 16105W??24
Ryzen 7 3700X$3298 / 1665W3.6 / 4.43224

The Ryzen 7 3700X adheres to a 65W TDP (thermal design power) and has a 3.6 GHz base clock and 4.4 GHz boost clock. The Ryzen 7 3800X, on the other hand, is rated for 105W and has more room to stretch its legs. It features a 3.9 GHz base clock and 4.5 GHz boost clock.

With those specifications in mind, the Ryzen 7 3750X could be leftover chips that didn't make qualifications for a Ryzen 7 3800X but are still superior over the Ryzen 7 3700X. With TSMC's rumored struggles with 7nm orders, AMD is probably eager to maximize its margins on every single chip it can get.

Technically, the Ryzen 7 3750X could squeeze between its counterparts. There's a 300 MHz and 100 MHz gap in between the Ryzen 7 3700X and Ryzen 7 3800X base and boost clocks, respectively. The Ryzen 7 3750X seemingly rocks a 105W TDP, so it should be faster than the Ryzen 7 3700X. In regards to pricing, the Ryzen 7 3700X and Ryzen 7 3800X have a $329 and $399 MSRP, respectively. That's a $70 difference, so AMD could push the Ryzen 7 3750X into the stack if the chipmaker really wants to.

Of course, there's also the rumor that the Ryzen 7 3750X might have two Core Complex Die (CCD), which could result in a higher amount of cache. However, we're not sure how much of an impact 64MB of L3 cache would have on an octa-core part.

As we've learned from the Ryzen 5 3500X, AMD could well offer the Ryzen 7 3750X for a selected region or a specific customer. We must bear in mind that AMD also produces custom processors for its clients. In either case, we shouldn't get our hopes up. Nevertheless, we'll keep our eyes open to see if the Ryzen 7 3750X comes to life.

  • jimmysmitty
    Is the Ryzen 7 3750X AMD's answer to Intel's approaching Core i9-9900KS?

    If they match core and thread counts, how will it possibly compete with a CPU that has a base turbo of 5GHz on all cores and has already been shown to OC to 5.2GHz on all cores (of course not all will) especially since we know Ryzen 3 has issues hitting their max boost clock (again not all )? It will compete in price and core/thread count only.

    More than likely this is AMD pushing out as many of the chiplets as possible to capitalize on their popularity and have better margins. It probably could have been a 3700X but was slightly better so package it as a different model, up the price and profit. Sounds like a normal every day business model to me.
    Reply
  • quadibloc2
    If it were slightly cheaper, and had, say, 3.8 base and 4.4 boost, I'd be interested. But even if it were closer to the 3700X in price, and had 3.6 base and 4.5 boost, I'd be less interested. The base clock is what really determines how much work it can do. Of course, boost clocks can matter for playing games.
    Reply
  • salgado18
    What if it is an entry-level TR4 CPU? Like the Steamroller-based entry level APUs to AM4, it's a basic CPU for the new socket. Less PCIe lanes than an entry level Threadripper, possibly less clocks or cache, and it makes sense for a gradual upgrade (replace motherboard now, get a better CPU later) or to capitalize on the connectivity without investing in an expensive CPU.
    Reply
  • joeblowsmynose
    salgado18 said:
    What if it is an entry-level TR4 CPU? Like the Steamroller-based entry level APUs to AM4, it's a basic CPU for the new socket. Less PCIe lanes than an entry level Threadripper, possibly less clocks or cache, and it makes sense for a gradual upgrade (replace motherboard now, get a better CPU later) or to capitalize on the connectivity without investing in an expensive CPU.

    Interesting idea ... but there was the 8 core 1900X TR and it didn't do so well, there was no eight core for gen 2 due to the lack of success regarding an 8 core HEDT part. Intel's low core HEDT parts were basically laughed out of the market at launch.

    The idea seems reasonable, but it seems in reality, previous attempts at such a chip have not been successful from either camp. They'd probably be better off just selling it as a R7 3750X -- granted it even becomes a reality.
    Reply
  • hannibal
    Hard to say. Sligtly more expensive than 3700x and slightly slower than 3800x... maybe. It all depends on how much more expensive it will be than 3700x... if the difference is small enough, there is point of having more powerhungry version that is slightly faster, if the price difference is small enough. 3800x is useless by now. Only slightly faster than 3700x and much more expensive... better go to 3900x is you need more than 3700x.
    If it comes out, I Expect to see 3800 to disappear from the market after that.
    Reply