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Intel Promotes Raja Koduri to Executive VP Following Arc GPU Development

Intel's Raja Koduri
(Image credit: Intel)

Raja Koduri, the head of Intel's Accelerated Computing Systems and Graphics, has been promoted to the position of Executive Vice President, according to an internal company memo seen by The Register. Penned by Intel CEO Pat Gelsinger on Tuesday, the memo acclaimed Koduri for his numerous contributions to the company over the past four years.

During the last four years, the division headed by Koduri has pushed Intel's GPU capabilities well past those of the company's integrated graphics. He was also exceptionally positioned to do so: Koduri moved to Intel directly from his role as head of arch-rival AMD's own Radeon Technologies Group, which has developed these types of accelerators for decades.

This promotion follows Raja Koduri's work in essentially rebuilding Intel's graphics division to position it for the high-stakes, multi-billion-dollar market of high performance GPUs in the last four years. That effort has, for now, culminated with the launch of Intel's Arc A350M and A370M discrete GPUs, mobile-oriented graphics cards that are the slowest of Intel's complete Arc Alchemist lineup.

While Intel's Arc performance so far hasn't been as good as the company initially hoped, its chances of ever doing so were miniscule from the outset. There's a reason only AMD and NVIDIA provide GPU accelerators for HPC. GPUs are some of the biggest, most complex pieces of silicon that ever come out of the world's leading foundries. AMD's only other competitor in this space, Nvidia, has a market capitalization that's twice as high as that of even giant Intel. The stakes are immense.

In the internal memo, Pat Gelsinger wrote that the world could now count on a third player in the high-performance GPU game, a critical segment for Intel's growth. The CEO lauded the execution on Intel's multi-generation roadmap for its Xe high-performance GPUs, spinning it as a pivotal technology for the enablement of the so-called Metaverse and Zetta-scale supercomputing.

Intel knows (or at least estimates) the ultimate performance if its upcoming graphics products better than anyone. As such, Koduri's promotion bodes well for the future GPU market. And that market looks much better divided by three players, at least for us consumers. Arc Alchemist may not be as potent as the competing solutions from AMD and Nvidia, especially once Nvidia's Ada and AMD's RDNA 3 architectures launch later this year, but it will hopefully serve as the springboard for significantly better architectures with the future Battlemage, Celestial, and Druid architectures.

Francisco Pires
Francisco Pires

Francisco Pires is a freelance news writer for Tom's Hardware with a soft side for quantum computing.

  • hotaru251
    apple, amd, intel...all thats left for his resume is nvidia.
    Reply
  • saltweaver
    Go Raja. I'm hoping Arc succeeds on mid range, enthusiast and pro level.
    Reply
  • waltc3
    If you'll check you will see that Intel, like most large companies, has a bunch of Executive Vice Presidents...;) The timing on this is especially interesting as Intel is yet to ship the discrete versions of ARc and the initial version is, well, not really competitive, AFAIK. Definitely bottom-tier stuff so far.
    Reply
  • waltc3
    hotaru251 said:
    apple, amd, intel...all thats left for his resume is nvidia.
    It's called the "peter principle"...;)
    Reply
  • Giroro
    Isn't this the guy who recycled GCN for like 10 years, being solely responsible for AMD's obsolete GPUs becoming completely uncompetitive with Nvidia (until they finally got rid of him).

    Maybe this is a case of him failing upward, because his career so far doesn't suggest he has the slightest idea how to develop a new product, especially not a GPU. He's the kind of uncreative guy who seems more qualified to head up the skylake refresh refresh refresh refresh on 14nm+++++++++. This promotion probably comes with a bigger golden parachute. That might not the best business decision for Intel to make while they are trying to open new markets and struggling to retake the lead in their golden goose server CPUs.
    Reply
  • guru7of9
    Raja Koduri's promotion seems a little premature, considering nothing of note has really been released yet from Intel graphics division.
    They are celebrating on the assumption its a job well done without any confirmation!
    They could well end up with egg on their face in 12 months time!
    I guess they are just happy he could improve upon their current igp's, as their last foray into discreet graphics was a dismal failure 15 odd years ago.
    In essence they set the bar pretty low !
    But we shall see !
    Reply
  • watzupken
    guru7of9 said:
    Raja Koduri's promotion seems a little premature, considering nothing of note has really been released yet from Intel graphics division.
    They are celebrating on the assumption its a job well done without any confirmation!
    They could well end up with egg on their face in 12 months time!
    I guess they are just happy he could improve upon their current igp's, as their last foray into discreet graphics was a dismal failure 15 odd years ago.
    In essence they set the bar pretty low !
    But we shall see !
    I was thinking the same. It is like, “Congrat! You are promoted for a product that is yet to launch”. I won’t count DG1 as a successful launch. It was “released” quietly, and seems to have vanished under the radar.
    Reply
  • watzupken
    Giroro said:
    Isn't this the guy who recycled GCN for like 10 years, being solely responsible for AMD's obsolete GPUs becoming completely uncompetitive with Nvidia (until they finally got rid of him).

    Maybe this is a case of him failing upward, because his career so far doesn't suggest he has the slightest idea how to develop a new product, especially not a GPU. He's the kind of uncreative guy who seems more qualified to head up the skylake refresh refresh refresh refresh on 14nm+++++++++. This promotion probably comes with a bigger golden parachute. That might not the best business decision for Intel to make while they are trying to open new markets and struggling to retake the lead in their golden goose server CPUs.
    Objectively, I feel he don’t have a lot of budget then to actively make changes to improve GPUs. It wasn’t so long ago that AMD almost went bankrupt. So perhaps he may fare better over at Intel with fat budgets. The problem here is that he is promoted for his effort for creating the ARC dGPUs, which ironically has been delayed again and again, and not yet available for sale.
    Reply
  • escksu
    waltc3 said:
    If you'll check you will see that Intel, like most large companies, has a bunch of Executive Vice Presidents...;) The timing on this is especially interesting as Intel is yet to ship the discrete versions of ARc and the initial version is, well, not really competitive, AFAIK. Definitely bottom-tier stuff so far.

    You need to realise that the main aim for Intel's GPU isn't really about gaming GPUs. The real aim is HPC-GPU, i.e. Ponte Vecchio. HPC-GPUs are highly sought after esp. in supercomputers. This is where Intel is heading.
    Reply
  • escksu
    watzupken said:
    Objectively, I feel he don’t have a lot of budget then to actively make changes to improve GPUs. It wasn’t so long ago that AMD almost went bankrupt. So perhaps he may fare better over at Intel with fat budgets. The problem here is that he is promoted for his effort for creating the ARC dGPUs, which ironically has been delayed again and again, and not yet available for sale.

    ARC will be delayed for a long long time... IT won't be available till Intel gets Ponte Vecchio out. Thats the real purpose why Intel even wants to revive its GPU dept.
    Reply