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Is Nvidia Already Discontinuing the RTX 2070 Super?

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

According to a source at MyDrivers.com (shoutout to VideoCardz for spotting it), Nvidia is discontinuing the RTX 2070 Super graphics card, having shipped the last batch of chips to its board partners. Starting now, it will not be manufacturing any more GPUs for this card, and the last remaining inventory will be sold.

Of course, there is a logical explanation for this move: Nvidia's Ampere cards are around the corner, and it is healthy for Nvidia to sell off the old stock and discontinue the product line early for a handful of reasons. Unsold stock when the new cards come out naturally gets expensive as it has to be discounted to sell, but discontinuing the old line also ensures that the RTX 2000 series don't end up competing (too much) with the RTX 3000 series.

Surely you remember when the RTX 2070 launched two years ago: despite early discontinuation, the GTX 1080 was still readily available at the RTX 2070 launch, which lead to low 1080 prices and somewhat slow initial adoption of the new RTX cards -- of course, that can be seen as a win for consumers, but we doubt Nvidia wants that scenario to play out for too long.

Now, according to MyDrivers the RTX 2080 Ti, RTX 2080 Super, and the RTX 2070 Super have all been discontinued, with just the RTX 2060 series and GTX 1660 remaining in the Turing line. 

If we may speculate a little, seeing Nvidia discontinue the entire high-end RTX lineup so quickly tells us that Nvidia is planning on launching the new high-end cards all in close succession. Reports around the web have the launch of the first RTX 3000 series cards pinned in September, with Nvidia completing the lineup in October.

But don't think you'll be able to buy the new cards immediately at launch. The new Ampere cards will undoubtedly be quite scarce at first with high prices, and AIC partners will be busy coming out with their own variants. Long story short, you'll want to give the entire GPU market some time to shift and settle down, which is among the reasons we believe that right now is a terrible time to buy a graphics card, especially in the high-end segment.

Meanwhile, if you want to know more about what to expect from the RTX 3000 series graphics cards, check out our all-we-know summary for more.

  • PapaCrazy
    I was one of those people who jumped on a leftover GTX1080. To this day, 2 years after RTX was released, I still can't get a better dollar to performance ratio.

    I don't know about you guys, but my value metric is still being judged by pre-Bitcoin standards. And there is nothing Nvidia can possibly do to change that for me, or my wallet. The GTX1080 works fine on Adobe. The GTX780 before it, due to its enormous memory bandwidth, worked fine too. If the goal is to coerce exorbitant spending for gaming, they're going to push people into next gen consoles instead.
    Reply
  • OldMarine
    I agree. They are acting like a dope dealer. I wish Intel would hurry up with a little competition.
    Reply
  • bigdragon
    I got a 1070 at $350 well before the cryptocurrency craze doubled the price years ago. GPU prices are still elevated. I'd like to pick up a 2070 (or even a 3070), but I don't understand the current pricing. A next-gen game console is a better value than an Nvidia card right now, and the games aren't broken ports on the console side.

    I mostly want to upgrade because of Blender. There are very few games worth purchasing. Most games these days are monetization schemes or gambling applications.
    Reply
  • Integr8d
    “we believe that right now is a terrible time to buy a graphics card, especially in the high-end segment”

    Fast forward to Ampere‘s release: “Don’t think about it. JUST BUY IT!”
    Reply
  • vinay2070
    PapaCrazy said:
    I was one of those people who jumped on a leftover GTX1080. To this day, 2 years after RTX was released, I still can't get a better dollar to performance ratio.

    I don't know about you guys, but my value metric is still being judged by pre-Bitcoin standards. And there is nothing Nvidia can possibly do to change that for me, or my wallet. The GTX1080 works fine on Adobe. The GTX780 before it, due to its enormous memory bandwidth, worked fine too. If the goal is to coerce exorbitant spending for gaming, they're going to push people into next gen consoles instead.
    True, I got an used mined GTX1080 for 300 USD as soon as the mining boom was over, when new ones were about 700$+ in my country . To this day, my GTX 1080 works fine. Though I might upgrade my GPU if I decide to go UWQHD. Until then am happy with my card. New ones today cost a bomb compared to GTX era.
    Reply
  • cryoburner
    bigdragon said:
    I got a 1070 at $350 well before the cryptocurrency craze doubled the price years ago. GPU prices are still elevated. I'd like to pick up a 2070 (or even a 3070), but I don't understand the current pricing. A next-gen game console is a better value than an Nvidia card right now, and the games aren't broken ports on the console side.

    I mostly want to upgrade because of Blender. There are very few games worth purchasing. Most games these days are monetization schemes or gambling applications.
    I agree that prices for a given level of performance are still higher than they probably should be at this point considering what the 10-series was offering four years ago, but it could also be argued that Nvidia shifted product names to encourage people to move up to higher price brackets than they would have otherwise considered paying for. The 2070 was more of a 1080 successor, while the 2060 was more of a 1070 successor, even if the performance gains weren't exactly all that compelling. The process node was only a slight improvement over what the 10-series was built on, so not getting big performance improvements at a given price level could probably be expected.

    In any case, the SUPER-series did adjust that a bit, with a slightly cut-down 2070 with 95% of the performance available for around $400 as the 2060 SUPER. That card can be around 35-40% faster than a 1070, plus the addition of new hardware for features like raytracing and upscaling, which could make it a somewhat reasonable upgrade for someone shopping in that price range. And performance close to a 1070 can now be had for around $230 with the 1660 SUPER, albeit with less VRAM. Of course, at this point, one might as well wait to see what the next generation of hardware has to offer unless a new graphics card is needed right away.
    Reply
  • hotaru251
    OldMarine said:
    I agree. They are acting like a dope dealer. I wish Intel would hurry up with a little competition.
    i recall seeing intel stated they are killing off their XE division in next few yrs due to raja kudori leaving Intel.
    Reply
  • ern88
    I have a GTX 1080 as well. It's treated me good. I am hoping that the RTX 3000 series will be a good size performance jump over the RTX 2000 series, as the GTX 1000 series was over the GTX 900 series cards. If that's the case I would either get the RTX 3080 or maybe even the RTX 3070. Or see what AMD will be trying to peddle. Agreed that we need Intel in the hunt, for some 3 way consumer action.
    Reply
  • vinay2070
    hotaru251 said:
    i recall seeing intel stated they are killing off their XE division in next few yrs due to raja kudori leaving Intel.
    Who said he is leaving Intel?
    Reply
  • watzupken
    hotaru251 said:
    i recall seeing intel stated they are killing off their XE division in next few yrs due to raja kudori leaving Intel.
    Killing the team does not make sense. I would rather think the team may be merged/ integrated/ rebranded with Raja taking on a bigger role.
    Reply