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Non-K Alder Lake CPU Specs Published

Intel
(Image credit: Intel)

So far, Intel has only introduced its 12th Generation Core 'Alder Lake' K-series desktop processors for enthusiasts that tend to overclock their CPUs (K models). The company has yet to introduce its 'regular' 12th-Gen processors designed for regular desktops, but PC makers have now listed them along with their preliminary specifications. Furthermore, the listings confirm that Intel plans to release non-K 12th Gen Core CPUs without integrated graphics.

DellDospara (a Japanese PC maker), and some retailers began to list systems based on Intel's non-K Alder Lake processors or the CPUs themselves this week, as noticed by @momomo_us (12). Demand for Intel's 12th-Gen Core processors is very high, but overclockable CPUs are pretty expensive. As such, it isn't surprising that suppliers have listed cheaper non-K versions even though they aren't currently available.

Speaking of availability, some optimistic retailers from the Netherlands expect Intel's Core i3-12100, Core i5-12400, Core i5-12500, and Core i9-12900 to be on shelves as early as November 26, 2021. Meanwhile, all non-K Alder Lake CPUs are rumored to be introduced at CES 2022 and hit the market early next year. 

The specs published by Dell and Dospara should be taken with a huge grain of salt because they might not be final. Meanwhile, it is pretty obvious from the leaked specs that Intel plans to extensively use its so-called Alder Lake-6P silicon for inexpensive versions of its 12th Generation Core processors.

ConfigurationP-Core ClocksE-Core ClocksCacheTDP
Core i9-12900K / KF8P + 8E | 24 threads3.20 ~ 5.20 GHz2.40 ~ 3.90 GHz30MB125W
Core i9-129008P + 8E | 24 threads2.40 ~ 5.10 GHz1.80 ~ ? GHz 30MB65W
Core i9-12900F8P + 8E | 24 threads2.40 ~ 5.? GHz1.80 ~ ? GHz 30MB65W
Core i7-12700K / KF8P + 4E | 20 threads3.60 ~ 5.0 GHz2.70 ~ 3.80 GHz25MB125W
Core i7-12700 / F8P + 4E | 20 threads2.10 ~ 4.90 GHz1.60 ~ ? GHz25MB65W
Core i5-12600K / KF6P + 4E | 16 threads3.70 ~ 4.90 GHz2.80 ~ 3.60 GHz20MB125W
Core i5-126006P | 12 threads3.30 ~ ? GHz-18MB125W
Core i5-12500?3.00 ~ ? GHz-??
Core i5-12400F6P | 12 threads2.50 ~ ? GHz-18MB65W
Core i3-12100 / F?3.30 GHz-??

Perhaps the most surprising piece about the Alder Lake-S family revealed by the leaks is that Intel is preparing non-K versions of 12th Generation Core CPUs without integrated graphics. 

Such processors are aimed primarily at inexpensive machines that use integrated graphics in most cases. Offering a Core i3 or a Core i5 CPU without a built-in GPU is not a good idea in a world where even entry-level standalone graphics cards cost $300 – $500. Perhaps, Intel is preparing the market for its lower-end Arc Alchemist discrete graphics boards, but this is a strange way to do it.

It's noteworthy that there are organizations that demand low-end discrete graphics cards in their PCs. Large OEMs may get CPUs with a disabled GPU from Intel, but these parts are usually considered semi-custom (or off-roadmap). In fact, non-K series processors without a built-in GPU have only been in Intel's standard lineup once in recent years: in early 2019, when Intel released its Coffee Lake Refresh parts.

  • larkspur
    In fact, non-K series processors without a built-in GPU have only been in Intel's standard lineup once in recent years: in early 2019, when Intel released its Coffee Lake Refresh parts.
    What? Comet Lake had i3, i5, i7 F models in "non-k" SKUs. Am I just reading this wrong?

    Offering a Core i3 or a Core i5 CPU without a built-in GPU is not a good idea in a world where even entry-level standalone graphics cards cost $300 – $500.
    I see a large number of entry-level graphics cards on Newegg for under $200. I won't list all of them, but here is a GT 1030 for $110 in stock, sold by Newegg and shipped by Newegg: https://www.newegg.com/gigabyte-geforce-gt-1030-gv-n1030d4-2gl/p/N82E16814932060?Item=N82E16814932060&quicklink=true
    That is the crappy DDR4 version of that card, but it's still entry level...
    Reply
  • helper800
    larkspur said:
    What? Comet Lake had i3, i5, i7 F models in "non-k" SKUs. Am I just reading this wrong?


    I see a large number of entry-level graphics cards on Newegg for under $200. I won't list all of them, but here is a GT 1030 for $110 in stock, sold by Newegg and shipped by Newegg: https://www.newegg.com/gigabyte-geforce-gt-1030-gv-n1030d4-2gl/p/N82E16814932060?Item=N82E16814932060&quicklink=true
    That is the crappy DDR4 version of that card, but it's still entry level...
    That 1030 is so useless its basically e-waste right out of the factory... If it costs 110 dollars minimum to get a card you mind as well just spend 20 dollars more on a non-f sku processor if all you need is a video out.
    Reply
  • larkspur
    helper800 said:
    That 1030 is so useless its basically e-waste right out of the factory... If it costs 110 dollars minimum to get a card you mind as well just spend 20 dollars more on a non-f sku processor if all you need is a video out.
    Lol, well yeah of course. But the author of this article claims entry-level graphics cards cost $300-$500. Not true. Also not true about the F SKUs. They've been a pretty regular part of the lineup.
    Reply
  • helper800
    larkspur said:
    Lol, well yeah of course. But the author of this article claims entry-level graphics cards cost $300-$500. Not true. Also not true about the F SKUs. They've been a pretty regular part of the lineup.
    The problem is that the 1030 basically is not an entry level graphics card for gaming, its an entry level video accelerator. I mean unless all you want to play are eSports titles at 720p high or 1080p minimum.
    Reply
  • larkspur
    helper800 said:
    The problem is that the 1030 basically is not an entry level graphics card for gaming, its and entry level video accelerator. I mean unless all you want to play are eSports titles at 720p high or 1080p minimum.
    He didn't specify gaming graphics cards... look at the quote. And the context is talking about low-end integrated graphics:
    Such processors are aimed primarily at inexpensive machines that use integrated graphics in most cases.

    We're in agreement, really. And while I'm sure they are capable of some low-res games and some older games, and they are getting better, I would not recommend anyone buy an Intel i5-10400/11400/12400 or whatever Intel CPU to game on the iGPU. Likewise I'm not recommending anyone buy a DDR4 GT 1030 to game either!
    Reply
  • evdjj3j
    helper800 said:
    The problem is that the 1030 basically is not an entry level graphics card for gaming, its and entry level video accelerator. I mean unless all you want to play are eSports titles at 720p high or 1080p minimum.

    Who said anything about gaming?
    Reply
  • helper800
    evdjj3j said:
    Who said anything about gaming?
    The 1030 can barely game and it is too expensive to use as a video out for an F CPU over just getting a non F CPU. My point is that its useless at everything I can think of.
    Reply
  • cryoburner
    helper800 said:
    The 1030 can barely game and it is too expensive to use as a video out for an F CPU over just getting a non F CPU. My point is that its useless at everything I can think of.
    The DDR5 version of the 1030 is arguably still capable enough to run many newer games at reduced settings and resolution, and could be seen as an upgrade over Intel's existing integrated graphics, at the very least. And there are undoubtedly people with old systems who could get even more of a performance and feature improvement out of it. And some prebuilts with very low-end PSUs might not even be able to handle anything more.

    The DDR4 version only gets around half the performance though, and would probably be a downgrade in performance over current integrated graphics. So while that particular model may technically be available for $120, it would make no sense to pair one with these processors.
    Reply