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Corsair Announces New Dominator Platinum DDR3 Memory

By - Source: Tom's Hardware US | B 19 comments

During Computex 2012, Corsair has announce the availability of its new addition to the Dominator line-up, the Dominator Platinum.

The Dominator series has been Corsair's long running enthusiast brand memory kits. Corsair has taken this series to the next level with the release of its Dominator Platinum DDR3 memory. The new design adds a customizable light bar to the list of exclusive features, which includes patented DHX cooling, Corsair Link support, and hand-screened DRAM ICs to help with its overclocking ability.

Dominator Platinum is available in dual and quad-channel kits with 8GB, 16GB, 32GB, and 64GB capacities, and frequencies up to 2800MHz. Dominator Platinum DDR3 memory is designed to fully exploit the performance potential of the latest Intel and AMD platforms, including the "Ivy Bridge" 3rd generation Intel Core processor family. All Dominator Platinum kits support Intel's latest XMP 1.3 profiles for easy performance tuning.

Its new light bar contains a user-swappable light pipe which lets enthusiasts tailor the lighting color to match their PC lighting and components. Dominator Platinum kits are supplied with a white light pipe, and additional light pipes will be available to purchase in the future.

In addition, the Dominator Platinum memory supports Corsair Link connectivity. This unique Dominator memory feature allows end-users to monitor DRAM temperature and other parametric data. Dominator Platinum memory kits support Corsair AirFlow fans and AirFlow Pro dynamic temperature and activity displays to provide the low temperatures required for stable and reliable overclocks.

Dominator Platinum Line-up:



Corsair Dominator Platinum DDR3 Memory

Corsair Dominator Platinum DDR3 memory is available now from Corsair's worldwide network of authorized distributors and resellers. They are supplied with a limited lifetime warranty and are backed up by Corsair's customer service and technical support.

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Top Comments
  • 14 Hide
    amuffin , June 8, 2012 6:10 AM
    Bragging rights? Yes.
    Real World Performance difference? No.
    Price Difference? Yes.
    Worth it? No.
  • 10 Hide
    blazorthon , June 8, 2012 6:52 AM
    amuffinBragging rights? Yes.Real World Performance difference? No.Price Difference? Yes.Worth it? No.


    Fast RAM is very beneficial in some very prevalent applications, although we all probably know that not everything benefits from faster RAM and in those circumstances, fast RAM would not be worth it. However, that doesn't have an impact on the fact that many people would benefit from very fast RAM for certain usage.
Other Comments
  • -3 Hide
    memadmax , June 8, 2012 6:07 AM
    Never did give a crap about lights....
    The last thing I need is someone knowing what I have under the hood and jacking my shit...
    Anyways...
    The article was kind of misleading.
    It said stuff about fans when it should have been talking about airflow over the heatsinks...
    Just my 2 cents...
  • Display all 19 comments.
  • 14 Hide
    amuffin , June 8, 2012 6:10 AM
    Bragging rights? Yes.
    Real World Performance difference? No.
    Price Difference? Yes.
    Worth it? No.
  • 10 Hide
    blazorthon , June 8, 2012 6:52 AM
    amuffinBragging rights? Yes.Real World Performance difference? No.Price Difference? Yes.Worth it? No.


    Fast RAM is very beneficial in some very prevalent applications, although we all probably know that not everything benefits from faster RAM and in those circumstances, fast RAM would not be worth it. However, that doesn't have an impact on the fact that many people would benefit from very fast RAM for certain usage.
  • 4 Hide
    Soul_keeper , June 8, 2012 7:09 AM
    Samsung is still the only one using 30nm ICs ?
    It would be nice to see others using 30nm for the high end stuff.
  • 0 Hide
    bspatial , June 8, 2012 7:11 AM
    not worth it! stop ripping us off.
  • 1 Hide
    SmaugTD , June 8, 2012 9:00 AM
    Still pretty good clock speeds :/ 
  • 4 Hide
    TheBigTroll , June 8, 2012 10:49 AM
    heatspreadeers a bit too tall?
  • 0 Hide
    s3anister , June 8, 2012 11:54 AM
    john_4The flashy overpriced stuff never makes it in my builds. I like their Power Supplies and they do OK with RAM but I usually wait until I actually go to get the parts for a new rig and then do my comparisons at Newegg.

    Yeah I've always got the feeling that this kind of product is the thing that high school kids beg about to their parents.

    "MOM. It's got HEATSINKS. BUY IT!"
  • 0 Hide
    monktongaz , June 8, 2012 12:06 PM
    I always found memory to be the least of my performance problems in PC builds. Hard drives, graphics, even motherboards all affected my performance more than memory. In fact, the only time memory speed was noticed was on a mini server I had with concurrent virtual PCs running.

    Still, if you can afford the price, and must have the latest and greatest, then the specs look good.
  • 1 Hide
    A Bad Day , June 8, 2012 12:19 PM
    amuffinBragging rights? Yes.Real World Performance difference? No.Price Difference? Yes.Worth it? No.


    Llano, Trinity, and other integrated GPUs would like to share a word with you. Give them enough bandwidth, and not only they'll be the king of the integrated GPUs, but also rival low-mid range dedicated ones as well.

    On a second thought, if one could afford such fast RAM sticks, couldn't they have used the money for a dedicated GPU?...
  • 0 Hide
    Reynod , June 8, 2012 12:50 PM
    Nice work Doug.

    I bought my first pair of TwinX a few years ago and never looked back ... those DDR1 sticks are still running 211 @ 12225 in an old 4400 (my memory is poor and I could have a few errant bits myself).

    I have had cheap sticks of noname ram die along the way from time to time.

    Quality control on these is very high ... only for discerning buyers ... not for the masses.
  • 0 Hide
    eddieroolz , June 8, 2012 3:48 PM
    2800MHz RAM didn't boost anything noticeably with the FX processors however. Intel stops scaling well before this.
  • 1 Hide
    blazorthon , June 8, 2012 8:33 PM
    A Bad DayLlano, Trinity, and other integrated GPUs would like to share a word with you. Give them enough bandwidth, and not only they'll be the king of the integrated GPUs, but also rival low-mid range dedicated ones as well.On a second thought, if one could afford such fast RAM sticks, couldn't they have used the money for a dedicated GPU?...


    Compression/decompression, rendering, folding, AVX accelerated AES encryption/decryption, and some other professional workloads can benefit greatly from fast RAM. Fast RAM can and does benefit certain workloads greatly. However, these are not typical of most users. For most users, fast RAM is not beneficial enough to justify the price. Regardless of that, faster RAM is very important for some applications. Some even scale performance roughly linearly with increased memory bandwidth so long as the rest of the computer can keep up.
  • 0 Hide
    pjmelect , June 8, 2012 10:20 PM
    A 20% increase in memory speed gives a 1.2% on average performance gain. Even a modest overclock will swamp any possible gains from the memory.
  • 0 Hide
    amuffin , June 8, 2012 10:44 PM
    blazorthonFast RAM is very beneficial in some very prevalent applications, although we all probably know that not everything benefits from faster RAM and in those circumstances, fast RAM would not be worth it. However, that doesn't have an impact on the fact that many people would benefit from very fast RAM for certain usage.

    SOME, if it were for every applications I would be running the highest speed possible!

    Unfortunately, it's only in programs that are very ram intensive and can benefit from faster ram. An example would be Adobe After Effects, but then we have GPU Acceleration with Nvidia CUDA and AMD APP........
  • 1 Hide
    blazorthon , June 8, 2012 11:37 PM
    pjmelectA 20% increase in memory speed gives a 1.2% on average performance gain. Even a modest overclock will swamp any possible gains from the memory.


    Again, that strongly depends on the application.

    amuffinSOME, if it were for every applications I would be running the highest speed possible!Unfortunately, it's only in programs that are very ram intensive and can benefit from faster ram. An example would be Adobe After Effects, but then we have GPU Acceleration with Nvidia CUDA and AMD APP........


    My point was that it was only some that benefit from it and repeating that changes nothing. Some people here were generalizing incorrectly by saying that faster memory never helps and that was completely wrong. Millions of people do work that benefits from fast RAM, even if that's only millions out of hundreds of millions or even billions of computer users. Higher bandwidth and/or latency memory can be crucial to improving the performance of many professionals' computers for their jobs. Faster RAM benefits rendering and since many people's income depends on how fast their computer(s) can render something, faster RAM can increase their income, more than justifying the extra cost over slower memory. Such examples can also be true of several other types of applications and many of these are very widely used applications in many professional and industrial markets.
  • 0 Hide
    Target3 , June 11, 2012 5:41 AM
    Would go nice with my SLI GTX 690s
  • 1 Hide
    blazorthon , June 11, 2012 5:46 AM
    target3Would go nice with my SLI GTX 690s


    No it wouldn't. This memory shouldn't help you in gaming any more than 1600MHz or 1866MHz would. Gaming is not bottle-necked by more than 1600MHz or 1866MHz, depending on the situation, and going beyond this does not help.
  • 1 Hide
    army_ant7 , June 16, 2012 7:43 PM
    With all those features and most probably, its price, couldn't they have made the heatsinks out of gold?! That's a joke of course. But how about copper?