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Report: Intels Haswell-E Processor to Support DDR4 Memory

By - Source: Fudzilla | B 28 comments

The upcoming ultra high-end Haswell-E processor will reportedly have support for DDR4 RAM.

Intel is reportedly developing an ultra high-end processor that they've codenamed "Haswell-E." It will replace the Ivy Bridge-E, a CPU that hasn't even been released yet but is expected to arrive in Q3 2013.

According to Fudzilla, the Haswell-E will have from 12 to 16 cores, a TDP of 130 W, and support for DDR4 memory that promises to deliver exponentially more bandwidth than previous generations of processors.

Given that none of these details have been finalized and that DDR4 memory is still far from being finalized or produced, we're somewhat skeptical of this report and are interested in seeing how much of it actually turns out to be true.

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Top Comments
  • 15 Hide
    Memnarchon , April 15, 2013 10:33 AM
    "the Haswell-E will have from 12 to 16 cores"
    What just happened? oO
    Do they wanted to write 6 cores and 8 cores (so 12 threads and 16 threads)? This is a serious jump from 6 cores to 12-16 if this is true...
  • 12 Hide
    Sakkura , April 15, 2013 11:26 AM
    Major errors in this article. DDR4 HAS been finalized; JEDEC released the final specification in September 2012. Production of DDR4 began in the second half of 2012. DDR4 DIMMs were demoed in early 2013, and will be sold beginning in late 2013 (for servers, since no consumer boards will support DDR4 at that time).
  • 11 Hide
    bartosz trzaska , April 15, 2013 10:41 AM
    I just feel so bad for AMD cpu's :( (((
Other Comments
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  • 5 Hide
    wanderer11 , April 15, 2013 10:05 AM
    I wonder how much of an impact faster ram speeds would even have in most tasks. In gaming there is already a miniscule improvement from 1333 to 2133 MHz.
  • 0 Hide
    corbeau , April 15, 2013 10:07 AM
    Hopefully this will help to offset the rising price of RAM
  • 4 Hide
    trumpeter1994 , April 15, 2013 10:10 AM
    This makes me not want to upgrade to haswell, I don't want to get stuck with DDR3 in when DDR4 is emerging like I did with my Core 2 Quad which got me stuck on DDR2 when DDR3 was coming out.
  • 3 Hide
    spentshells , April 15, 2013 10:22 AM
    lol this will replace my centurion that hasn't yet been released either... ROFL
  • 15 Hide
    Memnarchon , April 15, 2013 10:33 AM
    "the Haswell-E will have from 12 to 16 cores"
    What just happened? oO
    Do they wanted to write 6 cores and 8 cores (so 12 threads and 16 threads)? This is a serious jump from 6 cores to 12-16 if this is true...
  • 11 Hide
    bartosz trzaska , April 15, 2013 10:41 AM
    I just feel so bad for AMD cpu's :( (((
  • 2 Hide
    hannibal , April 15, 2013 10:52 AM
    Well this will come out late 2014, so maybe... The DDR4 is out before that. But as Menarchon allready said... those 12-16 are most propably threads, not cores...
  • -3 Hide
    JOSHSKORN , April 15, 2013 10:58 AM
    I call BS. 8 cores, max. It'll be a couple years before we see Intel go 12-16 cores. Why, I don't know.
  • 9 Hide
    hunshiki , April 15, 2013 11:25 AM
    Who doubt the core numbers.. check -E editions, and Xeon CPUs. We are not talking about consumer grade CPUs, it's Haswell-E. Something that the regular Joe cannot afford or just won't buy. I think it's quite possible Intel will ship it with so many cores. (Maybe they hired an AMD engineer?)
  • 12 Hide
    Sakkura , April 15, 2013 11:26 AM
    Major errors in this article. DDR4 HAS been finalized; JEDEC released the final specification in September 2012. Production of DDR4 began in the second half of 2012. DDR4 DIMMs were demoed in early 2013, and will be sold beginning in late 2013 (for servers, since no consumer boards will support DDR4 at that time).
  • 1 Hide
    edogawa , April 15, 2013 12:22 PM
    Can't wait for DDR4. :D 
  • 1 Hide
    InvalidError , April 15, 2013 1:00 PM
    Quote:
    I call BS. 8 cores, max. It'll be a couple years before we see Intel go 12-16 cores. Why, I don't know.

    Intel's current Xeon E7 lineup has 10 models featuring 10 cores and 20 threads: http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/processor-comparison/compare-intel-processors.html?select=server

    The lowest-end 10-core Xeon (E7-2850) had a $2558 launch price tag; roughly 8X the price of an i7-3770.

    And there is the Xeon Phi which has up to 60 cores and 240 threads.
  • 1 Hide
    Anonymous , April 15, 2013 1:07 PM
    I believe crucial are on track to release DDR4 sticks for the end of this year, clock speed will be higher, efficiency higher as well as higher density, although we don't really know what to do with faster memory right now, more RAM is always good as well as lower energy bills at this time
  • 1 Hide
    Rabin Pro , April 15, 2013 1:58 PM
    Why dont they release Hasewell E and just skip ivy bridge E.. why waste time?
  • 1 Hide
    stingstang , April 15, 2013 2:23 PM
    Samsung brought out ddr4 ram in 2011. How can this article claim it's not been finalized?
  • 2 Hide
    Sakkura , April 15, 2013 2:32 PM
    Quote:
    Samsung brought out ddr4 ram in 2011. How can this article claim it's not been finalized?

    That stuff was produced before the DDR4 specification was finalized (which happened in September 2012). There doesn't have to be a specification for people to produce some prototypes, indeed the specification probably takes lessons learned from prototypes into account.
  • -3 Hide
    iam2thecrowe , April 15, 2013 3:03 PM
    why dont they just skip to ddr5 like in graphics cards. Ive never even seen a device use ddr4, i would assume ddr5 would be cheaper as its more widely used already.
  • 1 Hide
    Sakkura , April 15, 2013 3:11 PM
    Quote:
    why dont they just skip to ddr5 like in graphics cards. Ive never even seen a device use ddr4, i would assume ddr5 would be cheaper as its more widely used already.

    Sigh... the GDDR5 used in graphics card is a modified version of DDR3 memory. DDR4 is newer and more advanced than GDDR5. Most likely they'll later develop a GDDR6 based on DDR4.
  • 0 Hide
    PreferLinux , April 15, 2013 5:20 PM
    Quote:
    Quote:
    why dont they just skip to ddr5 like in graphics cards. Ive never even seen a device use ddr4, i would assume ddr5 would be cheaper as its more widely used already.

    Sigh... the GDDR5 used in graphics card is a modified version of DDR3 memory. DDR4 is newer and more advanced than GDDR5. Most likely they'll later develop a GDDR6 based on DDR4.

    Actually, GDDR5 is based on GDDR4 and GDDR3, which were based on DDR2.

    RE this "report", we've known this for ages...
  • 0 Hide
    iamtheking123 , April 15, 2013 7:27 PM
    "Given that none of these details have been finalized"

    All of the details have been finalized, they just haven't been made public yet. Fudzilla is wrong in implying that "consumers" will get 12-16 cores. That'll be the higher end versions of the chip. -E will still be 6 cores...maybe 8 depending on what business decision the higher ups make.
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