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Intel's Ivy Bridge CPU Prices to be Similar to Sandy Bridge

By - Source: CPU-World | B 51 comments

We get an early price listing for Intel's Ivy Bridge processors, and compared them to similar current generation Sandy Bridge processors.

We first got details on the specifications for Intel's Ivy Bridge processors in the early December. Today, we get an early price listing (based on 1K units) of the Ivy Bridge processors from CPU-World. Looking at the prices, the new Ivy Bridge processors will be at the same price points as the current generation Sandy Bridge processors that the upcoming platform is replacing.


Model
Cores
(Threads)

Frequency
Turbo
Frequency
L3
Cache

TDP

Price
Current
CPU / Price

Core i5-3450

4 (4)

3.1 GHz

3.5 GHz

6 MB

77 W

$184

i5-2400 / $184

Core i5-3450S

4 (4)

2.8 GHz

3.5 GHz

6 MB

65 W

$184

i5-2400S / $184

Core i5-3470T

2 (4)

2.9 GHz

3.6 GHz

3 MB

35 W

$184

i5-2390T / $184

Core i5-3550

4 (4)

3.3 GHz

3.7 GHz

6 MB

77 W

$205

i5-2500 / $205

Core i5-3550S

4 (4)

3.0 GHz

3.7 GHz

6 MB

65 W

$205

i5-2500S / $205

Core i5-3750K

4 (4)

3.4 GHz

3.8 GHz

6 MB

77 W

$225

i5-2500K / $216

Core i5-3750T

4 (4)

2.3 GHz

3.3 GHz

6 MB

42 W

$205

i5-2500T / $205

Core i7-3770

4 (8)

3.4 GHz

3.9 GHz

8 MB

77 W

$294

i7-2600 / $294

Core i7-3770K

4 (8)

3.5 GHz

3.9 GHz

8 MB

77 W

$332

i7-2700K / $332

Core i7-3770S

4 (8)

3.1 GHz

3.9 GHz

8 MB

65 W

$294

i7-2600S / $294

Core i7-3770T

4 (8)

2.5 GHz

3.7 GHz

8 MB

45 W

$294

N/A

Based on the early performance seen with Ivy Bridge, the price point will make it an easier decision to make the jump to Ivy Bridge for a new build in April / May over current generation Sandy Bridge. What remains to be seen is whether or not Ivy Bridge performance will be enough for users to jump from a current gen Sandy Bridge to Ivy Bridge on a compatible motherboard.

Discuss
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Top Comments
  • 11 Hide
    amk-aka-Phantom , December 20, 2011 11:05 AM
    joytech22Look at those TDP's!Insanely low. Although.. Performance better be worth the price, because buying a new motherboard and CPU isn't cheap.


    New board not needed, P67 and Z68 support IB.

    What I wonder is who the hell buys those "T" and "S" versions...
Other Comments
  • 1 Hide
    Target3 , December 20, 2011 10:16 AM
    How is this different to Sandy bridge?
  • 7 Hide
    joytech22 , December 20, 2011 10:23 AM
    Look at those TDP's!
    Insanely low. :p 

    Although.. Performance better be worth the price, because buying a new motherboard and CPU isn't cheap.
  • 5 Hide
    Zeh , December 20, 2011 10:42 AM
    I don't think it's going to be such a huge performance increase over last gen as SB was. Intel doesn't even have to, since AMD is pretty much out of the game for at least a year.

    I'll guess the main upgrade is the lower power consumption and better IGP. Ofc I expect a ~15% increase in CPU performance, but that's about it, with a lower TDP they're not going to increase performance much.
  • 3 Hide
    N.Broekhuijsen , December 20, 2011 10:43 AM
    Hmm... succesor to the 2500K: i5-3750K looks like a sweet spot. Might just be upgrading to that from my old Phenom II 965. :) 
  • 5 Hide
    win7guru , December 20, 2011 10:45 AM
    I have my i7 2600 overclocked to 4.2ghz. I could push it further but don't want to kill it. No reason to upgrade for a marginal benefit.
  • 3 Hide
    nikorr , December 20, 2011 10:47 AM
    Prices of today.....
  • -5 Hide
    hardcore_gamer , December 20, 2011 10:51 AM
    target3How is this different to Sandy bridge?


    I was also thinking that. Same architecture, same clock frequency ,whats new in it ? :S
  • 7 Hide
    g00fysmiley , December 20, 2011 11:01 AM
    hardcore_gamerI was also thinking that. Same architecture, same clock frequency ,whats new in it ? :S



    die shrink
  • 1 Hide
    dgingeri , December 20, 2011 11:03 AM
    not surprising. They have no competition, so they come up with a way to make them cheaper, then sell them to us for the same price at the same speeds, and make more profit.

    I bet we won't see a real boost in performance for the next 3-4 years now, just like back in the early P4 days.
  • 11 Hide
    amk-aka-Phantom , December 20, 2011 11:05 AM
    joytech22Look at those TDP's!Insanely low. Although.. Performance better be worth the price, because buying a new motherboard and CPU isn't cheap.


    New board not needed, P67 and Z68 support IB.

    What I wonder is who the hell buys those "T" and "S" versions...
  • 6 Hide
    SchizoFrog , December 20, 2011 11:08 AM
    ZehI don't think it's going to be such a huge performance increase over last gen as SB was. Intel doesn't even have to, since AMD is pretty much out of the game for at least a year.I'll guess the main upgrade is the lower power consumption and better IGP. Ofc I expect a ~15% increase in CPU performance, but that's about it, with a lower TDP they're not going to increase performance much.

    Intel may not have to, but their road map was set years ago and there was no way to know that AMD would fall behind so far in the mid-high end market. If you have an SB based system then I would agree that it may well not be worth the expence of upgrading your system but for anyone else I think it will be a good choice. Just as long as you don't have to lash out on new HDD's that is...

    I for one will be building a new rig based around the i5 3750k, now I'll sit back and see what happens with the GPU market...
  • 3 Hide
    Anonymous , December 20, 2011 11:09 AM
    Different fabrication process. Therefore smaller transistors, therefore slightly increased speed in transistor on/off switching, therefore slightly increased performance on CPU bench tests.
  • 3 Hide
    spookie , December 20, 2011 11:12 AM
    target3How is this different to Sandy bridge?


    It has a different name...and don't forget the die shrink, so its basically the same thing, only a bit more effective
  • 1 Hide
    jijibu , December 20, 2011 11:22 AM
    when will they release i3 3xxx?
  • 0 Hide
    dickcheney , December 20, 2011 11:26 AM
    The TPDs are too low. I want a 150W 6-core chip @ 5.5GHz
  • 3 Hide
    JasonAkkerman , December 20, 2011 11:28 AM
    A pox on the house of Intel. These naming conventions need to be changed.

    /Will be getting the i7-3770K.
  • 0 Hide
    verbalizer , December 20, 2011 11:56 AM
    I couldn't wait for Ivy and now it seems I can.
    maybe Haswell will be the one top make me upgrade from an i5-760 @ 3.52GHz and SLi GTX 460 HAWKS.
    I passed over SB and now it seems Ivy too.

    reports say that in gaming only circumstances moving up from Nehalem is not worth it right now.
  • 4 Hide
    CaedenV , December 20, 2011 12:16 PM
    It's looking good! shaving off 20W while having a 5-10% expected performance increase on the processor, and nearly doubling the onboard GPU is nothing to snuff at. That is absolutely amazing. Plus the added PCIe3, possible Thunderbolt(though this will likely depend on the chipset), possibly native support for faster ram, possible WiDi, and more. Part of me is kinda sad that I could not wait for it to come before upgrading, but I'm still happy with my 2600.

    For whoever asked what the T and S modles are for: these are for special nitche markets, like workstation laptops, or specific use applications like kiosk setups and other things where they have a constrained power budget, but still need features like added cores, a larger cache, or hyper-threading. Most people would not want/need one.

    They should have had a different name scheme with SB-E to make things less confusing. SB-E should have stuck in the 2xxx range for processor numbers, and left the 3xxx for IB chips. Sure the SB-E will be faster, but the IB and later IB-E chips are rather a different monster.

    Cant wait for official reviews!
  • 0 Hide
    halls , December 20, 2011 12:17 PM
    Awesome chart and info, thanks Tom's!
  • 5 Hide
    Stza , December 20, 2011 12:18 PM
    My understanding is that the die shrink/lower TDP will potentially allow for greater overclocking headroom on the 'K' versions... with Sandy Bridge overclocking so well, it'll be interesting to see how much horsepower the enthusiast crowd can crank out of Ivy
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