Wii Vitality Sensor Axed Due to Inconsistant Test Results

When Nintendo release Wii Fit in 2007, it sold millions of copies in the first few months of availability. The game was the brainchild of Shigeru Miyamoto who hoped it would help gamers get fit and track their health. When Nintendo announced the Wii Vitality Sensor four years ago, at E3 2009, the company built on Wii Fit's abilities to help gamers monitor the overall state of their health. It described the Vitality Sensor as a groundbreaking product that would check the user's pulse as well as other variables and provide them with feedback about their bodies.

Unfortunately, it seems Nintendo is giving up on the device before it ever made it to market. VG24/7 reports that Nintendo has confirmed that the Wii Vitality Sensor is on the way out. The company's reason for discontinuing the device was that they could never get it to provide consistent results. Well, that and the fact that it wasn't actually all that useful beyond checking your vitals.

"We have not been able to launch it as a commercial product because we could not get it to work as we expected and it was of narrower application than we had originally thought," Satoru Iwata is quoted as telling investors during a Q&A.

So, that's it for the Vitality Sensor unless technological advancements allow Nintendo to improve upon the product.

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  • codo said:
    Developing cutting edge technology is not exactly nintendo's strong suit.


    You mean like shoulder buttons (Nintendo first: SNES) rumble feedback (Nintendo first: N64), native 4-player functionality (Nintendo first: N64) save feature (Nintendo first: NES Legend of Zelda) 3-D games on home console (Nintendo first: SNES StarFox) handheld gaming (Nintendo first: Game Boy), (Nintendo First: 3DS), motion controls (Nintendo first: Wii)?

    While Nintendo may not have invented each of these, they definitely made a mark and were the first to make these items popular. So much so, that everybody else plays catch-up with Nintendo.
    11
  • Other Comments
  • Developing cutting edge technology is not exactly nintendo's strong suit.
    -5
  • Which vitals would this thing check anyhow? Pulse could be monitored using electrodes embedded in the wiimote's grip. Temperature could be done more or less the same way by embedding thermocouples or diodes somewhere on the wiimote's body that almost always is in contact with the player.

    Blood pressure would be pretty difficult to get right on a finger/hand-mounted devices though - too much precision required and there likely is a lot more variance to how people's finger bloodflow change with pressure than arms.
    1
  • codo said:
    Developing cutting edge technology is not exactly nintendo's strong suit.


    You mean like shoulder buttons (Nintendo first: SNES) rumble feedback (Nintendo first: N64), native 4-player functionality (Nintendo first: N64) save feature (Nintendo first: NES Legend of Zelda) 3-D games on home console (Nintendo first: SNES StarFox) handheld gaming (Nintendo first: Game Boy), (Nintendo First: 3DS), motion controls (Nintendo first: Wii)?

    While Nintendo may not have invented each of these, they definitely made a mark and were the first to make these items popular. So much so, that everybody else plays catch-up with Nintendo.
    11