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Thin, Light Alienware 13 Gaming Notebook Coming With Intel Core Processors And NVIDIA 860M Graphics

By - Source: Tom's Hardware US | B 23 comments

For a while, Razer's 0.71-inch tall Blade seemingly dominated the ultra-thin gaming notebook sector. But as of late, other players like Origin PC and CyberPower have produced super-thin gaming solutions as well. Alienware appears to have no intention of letting that continue without a fight, as the company has released the Alienware 13, a thin-and-light gaming notebook that packs a punch not only in components, but in the style department, too.

According to the specifications, the Alienware 13 will arrive in three flavors: HD (1366 x 768, 200 nits, TN-panel, 45 percent color gamut), FHD (1920 x 1080, 350 nits, IPS-panel, 72 percent color gamut, double-wide viewing angles), and QHD with touch (2560 x 1440, 400 nits, IPS-panel, 72 percent color gamut, double-wide viewing angles).

The Alienware 13 is the company's thinnest gaming laptop to date, measuring just 1 inch thin and weighing slightly under 4.5 pounds. The laptop is also based on Intel Core processors, Nvidia GeForce 860M GTX graphics, and it offers up to 16 GB of DDR3 memory.

The specifications also show that the Alienware 13 includes support for up to two SSDs, Killer Wireless AC connectivity, and audio powered by Klipsch. Also included is Alienware's Command Center 4.0, AlienFX, and an Alienware TACTX keyboard. The laptop is cooled by using a copper thermal solution mounted inside the laptop.

 

CyberPower revealed a 15.6-inch thin-and-light gaming laptop last month packing an Intel Core i7-4710HQ Haswell processor and an Nvidia GeForce GTX 870M with 6 GB of VRAM. Keeping all of this cool is the company's Supra-Cool cooling system featuring dual fans and heatsinks. Also included is 8 GB of DDR3 memory, a 1 TB hard drive and Wireless N and Bluetooth connectivity. This laptop measures 0.82 inches thick, weighs 4.75 pounds and has a starting price of $1399.

Origin PC's EVO15-S includes a 15.6-inch eDP display with a 1920 x 1080 resolution, or customers can opt for the 15.6-inch screen with a 2880 x 1620 resolution. Under the hood is an Intel Core i7-4710HQ quad-core processor (2.5 GHz, 3.5 GHz), an Nvidia GeForce GTX 870M GPU with 3 GB of GDDR5 VRAM, and 16 GB of DDR3L-1600 memory. This notebook measures 0.79 inches tall, weighs 4.36 pounds and has a starting price of $2,199.

So how much will the Alienware 13 cost compared to these two competing laptops? Here's something to chew on: the Alienware 14 has a starting price of $1,099, and the Alienware 17 starts at $1,399. Unfortunately, pricing for the Alienware 13 won't be revealed until a later date.

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  • 6 Hide
    airborne11b , August 8, 2014 4:18 PM
    I'm not buying a gaming laptop again until there's one with Gsync or Freesync. My Gsync modded monitor is amazing, and I couldn't imagine gaming without Gsync or something similar ever again.

  • 2 Hide
    Blazer1985 , August 8, 2014 4:32 PM
    Still on the not so thin-and-light side imho but at least for now the cooling department of the alienwares has always been flawless so the small added weight and size compared to the competition could proof itself more than worthy.
  • 6 Hide
    TechyInAZ , August 8, 2014 4:50 PM
    I like the silver finish, however I still think the alien look is goofy.

    Interesting to finally see alienware stepping it up a notch, since I haven't heard of any new slim laptops from Dells gaming line.
  • Add your comment Display all 23 comments.
  • 7 Hide
    jasonelmore , August 8, 2014 5:36 PM
    dear oem's.... please stop using killer nic. Intel nic much better, intel wireless much better.

    Thanks
  • 0 Hide
    envain , August 8, 2014 7:36 PM
    I have the r2 of the mx14 and its a great laptop. I run multiple vms for testing, some gaming and it holds up quite well my one gripe was the weight. Dell seems like they have indeed improved over the past few years from what i experienced in the past and i buy a lot of their stuff for my clients. Would love to trade in mine for something like this.
  • -1 Hide
    Kraszmyl , August 8, 2014 8:44 PM
    Quote:
    dear oem's.... please stop using killer nic. Intel nic much better, intel wireless much better.

    Thanks


    And how do you figure? Every review of it shows it beating or equaling intel nics. Not a huge fan of the software so I don't load it but the nic itself and their firmware/drivers seem rather good minus some of the weird problems that seem to crop up with Intel nics and tethering.
  • 1 Hide
    LummusMaximus , August 9, 2014 2:33 AM
    I've been waiting for Alienware to release a thin and light. I always hoped/knew that they'd have to eventually.
  • -4 Hide
    razzb3d , August 9, 2014 4:52 AM
    There's nothing "gaming" about the 860M. It's miles away (performance wise) from it's desktop counterpart - being closer in performance to the GT 750 (non-Ti). See for yourselves. http://www.notebookcheck.net/NVIDIA-GeForce-GTX-860M.107794.0.html
  • 9 Hide
    edwd2 , August 9, 2014 5:57 AM
    Thin and light gaming laptops... better wait for 14nm broadwell + 20nm maxwell
  • 1 Hide
    chicofehr , August 9, 2014 7:42 AM
    These would be great for those who are traveling allot and not home much and live in hotel for work like me. But if you go home everyday, then use a proper 3 monitor desktop setup and nice sound system. I miss my desktop and something like this will never be used when I am home but great when I'm not.
  • 2 Hide
    soldier44 , August 9, 2014 8:09 AM
    As usual opting for the highest res 2880 x 1620 and an SSD will be well over 2 grand nearly 3 grand for a laptop that can barely manage 30 fps at medium settings in most games with that 860m. If you want thin go with a Razer blade laptop.
  • -1 Hide
    iknowhowtofixit , August 9, 2014 2:11 PM
    I'm sure it will be overpriced and poorly built like the rest of Alienware's offerings.
  • 2 Hide
    TheinsanegamerN , August 9, 2014 4:37 PM
    Quote:
    There's nothing "gaming" about the 860M. It's miles away (performance wise) from it's desktop counterpart - being closer in performance to the GT 750 (non-Ti). See for yourselves. http://www.notebookcheck.net/NVIDIA-GeForce-GTX-860M.107794.0.html

    the desktop counterpart of the 860m Is the 750ti. they are LITERALLY the same chip, just clocked a little lower. a desktop 860 does not exist. do some research next time.
  • 2 Hide
    photonboy , August 9, 2014 6:09 PM
    It's perfectly fine to call an 860M a "gaming" laptop because it is. It's common knowledge that laptop GPU's don't have the same performance but an 860M in a laptop is probably within the top 1% of currently sold laptops for game performance (comparing all).

    I don't get why people think laptops have to compare in performance to a top-end desktop to be considered "gaming" machines especially considering the limited space. This GPU will play any game on the market quite nicely provided you've properly tweaked the settings.
  • 5 Hide
    airborne11b , August 9, 2014 8:06 PM
    Quote:
    It's perfectly fine to call an 860M a "gaming" laptop because it is. It's common knowledge that laptop GPU's don't have the same performance but an 860M in a laptop is probably within the top 1% of currently sold laptops for game performance (comparing all).

    I don't get why people think laptops have to compare in performance to a top-end desktop to be considered "gaming" machines especially considering the limited space. This GPU will play any game on the market quite nicely provided you've properly tweaked the settings.


    This is true, but I'd also add that 860M GTX is still more capable than the next gen consoles are (considering XboxOne and PS4 games are rocking 790p - 1080p, no AA, high settings, 30fps / 60fps) which an 860m GTX is capable of delivering on a mobile laptop, I'd say that qualifies it as a "gaming" laptop.

    FFS the 860m GTX gets 55fps on BF4 on high at 900p.

    That's pretty damn solid for a laptop.
  • 0 Hide
    PossumJones , August 9, 2014 11:58 PM
    I like the new $2500 Razer. I wont buy it, cause i dont need it, but i do like it, a lot more than any of the laptops mentioned here.
  • 0 Hide
    nforce4max , August 10, 2014 1:45 PM
    Not bad for a modern laptop, I wonder what materials the body is made out of. Those like myself who have or are currently working in a shop know just how common it is to see laptops with broken plastics and cracked screens. The cooling is likely better than most that it has dual fans with a proper cooler layout. If the coolers are like anything before the fins are aluminum and there is likely only two copper heatpipes.
  • 0 Hide
    darkbreeze , August 10, 2014 3:45 PM
    Quote:
    Still on the not so thin-and-light side imho but at least for now the cooling department of the alienwares has always been flawless so the small added weight and size compared to the competition could proof itself more than worthy.

    I don't know how you figure that. If you had any idea how many of the Alienware so called "Gaming" laptops we've seen with overheating issues, I don't think you would make that statement. Even stock clocked units with no turbo core or turbo boost enabled have presented heat issues. Fix the heat issues BEFORE you cram more, better, faster and hotter components inside the cases.
  • 0 Hide
    shobab , August 10, 2014 9:10 PM
    Thin gaming notebooks are great. I have the GS60 3k Edition from MSI and it is the best thing for me. I am not a fan of Razer's keyboards on their laptops, but the MSI's Steelseries is very nice. I work overseas, and travel around a lot so it helps having a powerful computer that is 4lb.

    http://www.msi.com/product/nb/GS60-2PE-Ghost-Pro-3K-Edition.html#hero-specification
  • 0 Hide
    jimhood82 , August 12, 2014 1:33 AM
    Quote:

    And how do you figure? Every review of it shows it beating or equaling intel nics. Not a huge fan of the software so I don't load it but the nic itself and their firmware/drivers seem rather good minus some of the weird problems that seem to crop up with Intel nics and tethering.

    It is obvious you have never used a Killer nic card. The limited testing done for reviews doesn't show the weaknesses that show up under constant usage. For example, I often find the Killer software memory usage growing to out of control levels. After about 2 weeks without restarting the machine, you end up at nearly 750MB of ram used for the nic cards. And by that point, the software is simply unusable. The "packet prioritization" is entirely garbage. I tried it a couple times, including over different software versions. In the end, the system was nearly unusable due to buggy software blocking random things from using the internet entirely.

    Trust the people who have used recent Killer products; they aren't worth it.
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