Lenovo Officially Announces A10 Android Laptop

Lenovo introduced on Friday its very first dual-mode Android 4.2 "Jelly Bean" laptop, the Lenovo A10. The device sports a 10.1 inch screen that can be flipped around 300 degrees, creating a "stand/theater mode" for watching videos and playing games hands-free. The stable hinge and "fold-back" design keeps the device steady and prevents shaking and bouncing while using the 10-point multi-touch screen.

This is the very same Android notebook that was accidently revealed in a posted manual last week. As previously reported, the device features a quad-core Rockchip RK3188 Cortex-A9 SoC clocked at 1.6 GHz, 1 GB or 2 GB of RAM, 16 GB or 32 GB of internal storage, and a microSD card slot for up to 64 GB of extra storage. Connectivity will consist of a USB port and combo audio jack on the left side, and another USB port, microUSB port, and microHDMI port on the right.

The updated press release specifies that the laptop also sports a 0.3MP web cam and a battery that promises up to 9 hours of continuous video playback on a single charge. Also included is a full-size ergonomic, AccuType keyboard with dedicated Android buttons like "Home," "Back," "Multitask," "Settings" and a few others.

"'In laptop mode,' users can take advantage of the A10's unique, Lenovo-customized user interface, which provides an app launcher, task bar and status bar for quick, intuitive access to the app library and desktop, as well as convenient multitasking and app switching," reads the company's press release. "File manager software, also included with the Lenovo customized OS, makes it easy to locate and manage a library of documents, videos and music."

Last week the leaked manual (pdf) revealed a SIM card slot, a built-in touch pad, a built-in microphone located on the right side, and what appears to be two speakers mounted on the bottom. The home screen looks exactly as one would expect from an Android tablet, displaying the status bar and Google Search bar along the top. Another toolbar resides along the bottom with the Apps Launcher button sitting on the far left.

Unfortunately, the company still hasn't provided specific details regarding availability and pricing, and the product still isn't listed on the Lenovo website. Yet, notice that the company dropped the "IdeaPad" name in Friday's announcement, merely referring to the notebook as the Lenovo A10. Stay tuned for more information as it rolls out.

Follow us @tomshardware, on Facebook and on Google+.

Create a new thread in the US News comments forum about this subject
This thread is closed for comments
12 comments
    Your comment
  • stevejnb
    Depending on pricing, this type of thing would more or less make Chromebooks utterly pointless. Hoping more companies go this route.
    1
  • iamadev
    1315339 said:
    Depending on pricing, this type of thing would more or less make Chromebooks utterly pointless. Hoping more companies go this route.


    Chromebooks don't need this type of machine to make them utterly pointless
    8
  • stevejnb
    900935 said:
    1315339 said:
    Depending on pricing, this type of thing would more or less make Chromebooks utterly pointless. Hoping more companies go this route.
    Chromebooks don't need this type of machine to make them utterly pointless


    Strictly speaking, they do have a place right now, however much I think they are wastes of time. Super lightweight and free operating system on an inexpensive machine designed with responsiveness and speed in mind with a decent set of productivity tools at rock bottom prices - that's what Chromebooks are at this point. The Windows laptops you get in the same price range are, while *vastly* more feature rich and not online reliant, generally much slower than a Chromebook. For some people, this is important, and the formula works - though personally, I'd take either an Android tablet or a cheap laptop in the same price range every time.

    The thing is, Android laptops in this price range will do every damned thing a Chromebook online, will do most of it without the online requirement, will do exponentially more, and still be a free OS. I just can't see why the heck you'd want to stick with a Chromebook ahead of an Android laptop after that.
    0