VESA Announces 63% Increase in DisplayPort Certification

DisplayPort is a display connectivity standard that was designed in 2006, produced in 2008, and slowly but steadily gained in popularity. The organization behind it, VESA, has now announced that over the year 2013 a total of 300 new DisplayPort products have been certified. Reportedly, this is a 63 percent increase over previous years.

"DisplayPort is a flexible and robust standard because it is based on an adaptable packet-based architecture," said Craig Wiley, Sr. Director of Marketing for VESA member Parade Technologies, and Chair of the VESA Board of Directors. "Because of its many advantages, DisplayPort was chosen as a core technology for Thunderbolt, and as the internal video connection for almost all new high resolution notebook computer designs."

"Consumers increasingly seek out the DisplayPort logo when purchasing new computers, displays and other products," explained Bill Lempesis, VESA executive director. "DisplayPort's thorough certification process assures the buyer that their new DisplayPort purchase is flawlessly interactive with other DisplayPort products. DisplayPort is constantly evolving, with new features like multiple display streaming over a single cable, and 4K x 2K display resolution at 60 Hz with up to 30-bit per pixel color depth."

The organization also announced that it will have various new DisplayPort certified products on display at CES 2014, from January 6-10.

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  • Grandmastersexsay
    Screw HDMI, displayport, and any other "certified" non open standard. The first poster wanted to know how VESA makes their money? The answer is probably that they are funded by some Hollywood production company or some other organization wanting to push DRM.

    Video capture for a digital connector would be cheap and simple from a hardware perspective and would produce much better results than an analog capture card. Of course no such device will get certified.

    Here's to hoping USB eventually takes over and becomes the default video connector and that these proprietary DRM based connectors die a painful death.
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  • freedom4556
    Anonymous said:
    If DisplayPort is royalty free where does VESA make money ? In terms of rate it is a bit better than HDMI.


    Anonymous said:
    Screw HDMI, displayport, and any other "certified" non open standard. The first poster wanted to know how VESA makes their money? The answer is probably that they are funded by some Hollywood production company or some other organization wanting to push DRM.

    Video capture for a digital connector would be cheap and simple from a hardware perspective and would produce much better results than an analog capture card. Of course no such device will get certified.

    Here's to hoping USB eventually takes over and becomes the default video connector and that these proprietary DRM based connectors die a painful death.

    Dude, take the tinfoil hat off. VESA charges once for the specification, but does not charge a royalty based on each device. They also charge membership fees. Your never going to get away from things like HDCP and DPCP, but it is trivial to make an uncertified device that strips the protection off. They already do so for DVI/HDMI. Many sites like Tom's have the digital capture equipment you describe and use it in their video card reviews. It is critical in the functioning of fcat, which they use to measure frame time.
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  • Grandmastersexsay
    Anonymous said:
    Dude, take the tinfoil hat off. VESA charges once for the specification, but does not charge a royalty based on each device. They also charge membership fees. Your never going to get away from things like HDCP and DPCP, but it is trivial to make an uncertified device that strips the protection off. They already do so for DVI/HDMI. Many sites like Tom's have the digital capture equipment you describe and use it in their video card reviews. It is critical in the functioning of fcat, which they use to measure frame time.


    It's trivial for an electrical engineer to make such a device. Of course he can't legally sell it.

    Now, please provide me a link to a capture card I can add to my PC that will capture and strip out DRM from a raw HDMI signal in the sub $500 ballpark so I can add it to my HTPC. One of these should be simpler and cheaper than the $100 analog cards on the market.

    There is absolutely no reason the industry can't migrate to an open standard that doesn't incorporate DRM. Absolutely no one benefits from DRM. It just adds another level of complexity without any benefit to anyone. The companies designing the hardware certainly get nothing out of it, except the bribes of course. Even the companies who are trying to keep their videos from getting pirated don't benefit. It's all available anyway. DRM has done nothing to curb piracy. The quality of pirated movies is at an all time high. You can set up an RSS feed that can download your favorite shows within hours of their broadcast while having a better quality than most cable companies broadcast it in.

    At 5 Gb/s, USB 3.0 has plenty of bandwidth for 1080p which uses 3 Gb/s max uncompressed. I don't want to get into 4K being a marketing ploy, but if for some reason that does catch on, there will be a new USB protocol by that point anyway.
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