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Kingston ValueRAM PC3-10600

DDR3-1333 Speed and Latency Shootout
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Kingston is probably the most mainstream brand of this shootout, offering a complete module range from mundane to spectacular. In fact the company provided us with two similar-speed kits, its ValueRAM PC3-10600 being the "standard performance" parts.

The modules look rather mundane, but Kingston blesses its part number KVR1333D3N8/1G with performance-oriented 8-8-8-24 rated timings at a motherboard's stock 1.50 volts. Two of these 1 GB modules are needed to make a dual-channel "kit," thus the company provided two packages for this comparison.

SPD values for 667, 583, 500 and 416 MHz allow automatic configuration to DDR3-1333, DDR3-1066, DDR3-1000 and DDR3-800 settings, with a little overclocking headroom for the odd-appearing 416 and 583 MHz clock rates.

Because these modules provide an SPD value exactly the same as the rated settings, a builder won't need to manually configure BIOS to reach rated performance levels.

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  • 1 Hide
    dv8silencer , May 7, 2008 12:45 AM
    I have a question: on your page 3 where you discuss the memory myth you do some calculations:


    "Because cycle time is the inverse of clock speed (1/2 of DDR data rates), the DDR-333 reference clock cycled every six nanoseconds, DDR2-667 every three nanoseconds and DDR3-1333 every 1.5 nanoseconds. Latency is measured in clock cycles, and two 6ns cycles occur in the same time as four 3ns cycles or eight 1.5ns cycles. If you still have your doubts, do the math!"

    Based off of the cycle-based latencies of the DDR-333 (CAS 2), DDR2-667 (CAS 4), and DDR3-1333 (CAS8), and their frequences, you come to the conclusion that each of the memory types will retrieve memory in the same amount of time. The higher CAS's are offset by the frequences of the higher technologies so that even though the DDR2 and DDR3 take more cycles, they also go through more cycles per unit time than DDR. How is it then, that DDR2 and DDR3 technologies are "better" and provide more bandwidth if they provide data in the same amount of time? I do not know much about the technical details of how RAM works, and I have always had this question in mind.
    Thanks
  • 1 Hide
    Anonymous , June 27, 2008 12:08 PM
    Latency = How fast you can get to the "goodies"
    Bandwidth = Rate at which you can get the "goodies"
  • 0 Hide
    Anonymous , June 27, 2008 9:23 PM
    So, I have OCZ memory I can run stable at
    7-7-6-24-2t at 1333Mhz or
    9-9-9-24-2t at 1600Mhz
    This is FSB at 1600Mhz unlinked. Is there a method to calculate the best setting without running hours of benchmarks?
  • 0 Hide
    Anonymous , October 3, 2008 5:13 PM
    Sorry dude but you are underestimating the ReapearX modules,
    however hard I want to see what temperatures were other modules at
    a voltage of ~ 2.1v, does not mean that the platinum series is not performant but I saw a ReapearX which tended easy to 1.9v(EVP)940Mhz, that means nearly a DDR 1900, which is something, but in chapter of stability/temperature in hours of functioning, ReapearX beats them all.
  • 0 Hide
    Anonymous , October 6, 2008 5:47 PM
    All SDRAM (including DDR variants) works more or less the same, they are divided in banks, banks are divided in rows, and rows contain the data (as columns).
    First you issue a command to open a row (this is your latency), then in a row you can access any data you want at the rate of 1 datum per cycle with latency depending on pipelining.

    So for instance if you want to read 1 datum at address 0 it will take your CAS lat + 1 cycle.

    So for instance if you want to read 8 datums at address 0 it will take your CAS lat + 8 cycle.

    Since CPUs like to fill their cache lines with the next data that will probably be accessed they always read more than what you wanted anyway, so the extra throughput provided by higher clock speed helps.

    But if the CPU stalls waiting for RAM it is the latency that matters.
  • 0 Hide
    Anonymous , December 15, 2012 10:41 AM
    what is on pc3-10600s "s" ?