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Intel Officially Kills Cannon Lake Graphics Support

(Image credit: Shutterstock)

Intel may be having difficulty bringing 10nm to desktop processors now, but this isn't the first time the 10nm process has given the company trouble. Back before Ice Lake, Intel's first 10nm mobile line was actually the ill-fated Cannon Lake. While it was originally set to be a much bigger deal, with several chips planned for launch, it eventually only saw one processor hit the market, and only in China. That processor, the Core i3-8121U, shipped with disabled internal graphics, and new code today sees Intel essentially admitting that support for the line is dead. As well as slyly hinting at the company's feelings towards it.

Prior to today, Intel's Linux graphics drivers had code for Cannon Lake CPUs using 10th Gen iGPUs. But since no Cannon Lake chips were ever released that take advantage of that, Intel's decided to do some pruning on the drivers' code. With extreme prejudice.

The latest Intel merge on the drivers says "We don't need CNL-only code. This series kills it all with fire."

Well, now we know how Intel's Linux driver developers feel about Cannon Lake. And since the merge was able to reduce the drivers' code by just under 11,000 lines, we don't blame them.

If you ask Intel today, it will say that Ice Lake was its first "mass 10nm shipment." Cannon Lake, it seems, is something it would rather forget. Many Cannon Lake products were cancelled along with its other chips, and it's most well-known for being in a low-power education focused Chinese Ideapad. But as much as it tries to erase Cannon Lake- literally, in this case - it still comes to mind given Intel's current problems bringing 10nm processors to the desktop. 

Source: Phoronix

  • spongiemaster
    How do you kill support for something that never existed in the first place?
    Reply
  • InvalidError
    spongiemaster said:
    How do you kill support for something that never existed in the first place?
    Intel has tons of products that exist but almost nobody has heard about, CNL just happens to be one of the better-known ones for being such a well-publicized failure as the poster child for Intel's 10nm woes.
    Reply
  • spongiemaster
    InvalidError said:
    Intel has tons of products that exist but almost nobody has heard about, CNL just happens to be one of the better-known ones for being such a well-publicized failure as the poster child for Intel's 10nm woes.
    I was questioning the premise of this "news" article, not what Intel was doing. There never was a product sold with a working CNL gpu, so how could Intel kill support for it? Removing driver support for an older but popular GPU could be useful news, removing driver support for a product that never existed? Not so newsworthy.
    Reply
  • hotaru.hino
    spongiemaster said:
    I was questioning the premise of this "news" article, not what Intel was doing. There never was a product sold with a working CNL gpu, so how could Intel kill support for it? Removing driver support for an older but popular GPU could be useful news, removing driver support for a product that never existed? Not so newsworthy.
    Support being Intel is going to spend resources developing and maintaining the code. Since Gen10 never was released, there's no point in keeping what's effectively dead code.
    Reply
  • spongiemaster
    hotaru.hino said:
    Support being Intel is going to spend resources developing and maintaining the code. Since Gen10 never was released, there's no point in keeping what's effectively dead code.
    Yup, now Intel can reassign the dozens of engineers that have been continuously working on perfecting the drivers for the CNL iGPU up until just now, even though they've known for years there was never going to be an actual product. With the additional manpower at their disposal, maybe Alder Lake's release will get moved up.
    Reply
  • bgrngod
    Intel released a NUC with that same CPU in it too, but it didn't seem to be widely available. It also had AMD graphics in it.
    Reply
  • hotaru.hino
    spongiemaster said:
    Yup, now Intel can reassign the dozens of engineers that have been continuously working on perfecting the drivers for the CNL iGPU up until just now, even though they've known for years there was never going to be an actual product. With the additional manpower at their disposal, maybe Alder Lake's release will get moved up.
    That's a problem for the bean counters.
    Reply