Skip to main content

GTX 1650 Super Purportedly Receives Significant Upgrade

GTX 1650 (non-Super) GPU
(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

Just yesterday we figured out that Nvidia was also releasing a GeForce GTX 1650 Super, but we didn’t know the complete specifications yet. Low and behold, within just a day, VideoCardz posted what it claims are the full specifications.

We speculated that next to the memory upgrade from GDDR5 to GDDR6, the GTX 1650 Super would also be receiving a boost to its GPU specifications – and if VideoCardz’ report is to be believed (which historically does seem to be the case), we were right in thinking so. It’s also a very impressive bump: the GPU will go from carrying 896 cores in the GTX 1650 to an impressive 1280 CUDA cores in the GTX 1650 Super, and will also be bumped from a max boost clock of 1665 MHz to 1725 MHz. It will, however, keep its original 32 ROPs.

(Image credit: VideoCardz)

If these specs are to be believed, the GTX 1650 Super should perform noticeably better than the GTX 1650. Of course, it can certainly use this upgrade, as the original GTX 1650 didn't do so great in our review.

The GTX 1650 was not quite so great at pushing smooth gaming at 1080p, and also didn’t have the latest NVENC encoding hardware. The latter has reportedly also been updated to the Turing NVENC encoder, and with regards to performance, we reckon that the increase in memory and GPU performance should definitely help the card work better as a 1080p gaming card.

That being said, much like the higher-end Super cards that kept the same price or received a price cut, and the GTX 1660 Super is expected to only see a $10 price increase over its non-Super counterpart. The purported upgrade to the GTX 1650 Super is of enough significance that I reckon we will be seeing a higher increase in MSRP than just $10.

If you're in the market for a 1080p graphics card around the $160 to $220 price point, you should wait to see what's coming before making a purchase decision. Nvidia not only has the GTX 1650 Super coming, but also the GTX 1660 Super, and AMD is also expected to release its RX 5500 graphics card soon.  

Only time will tell. The expected reveal date for the GTX 1650 Super remains November 22nd, so sit tight for more. 

  • King_V
    Interesting - I'm actually looking forward to seeing how this gets priced, and how it performs.

    I imagine that Nvidia HAD to do something about this, considering how dismally the 1650 did versus the RX 570. The only advantage the 1650 had was much lower power draw.
    Reply
  • Olle P
    The GTX 1650 is still the 75W king.
    GTX 1650 Super is rated at 100W TDP, which sort of breaks the PCIe slot barrier.

    I find the 1660 Super to be more interesting. It's a 1660 with 75% faster memory.
    Is the vanilla 1660 really so unbalanced that simply speeding up the VRAM will have a significant impact?
    If it does make a difference then the 1660 Super will be close to the 1660 Ti in performance (and the 1660 can be seen as a poor design).
    Reply
  • King_V
    Olle P said:
    The GTX 1650 is still the 75W king.
    GTX 1650 Super is rated at 100W TDP, which sort of breaks the PCIe slot barrier.

    I find the 1660 Super to be more interesting. It's a 1660 with 75% faster memory.
    Is the vanilla 1660 really so unbalanced that simply speeding up the VRAM will have a significant impact?
    If it does make a difference then the 1660 Super will be close to the 1660 Ti in performance (and the 1660 can be seen as a poor design).

    I wondered about that myself. I was really puzzled, given the performance difference, that the 1660 and 1660Ti both had a 120W TDP.

    While I can't imagine Nvidia doing this, I'd be a little surprised if the 1660 Super wound up using MORE power than the 1660Ti.


    If the 1650 Super is a 100W card, what is it going to perform like? And, is it going to be inefficient relative to the 1660/1660Ti given that they are 120W cards?
    Reply
  • Olle P
    King_V said:
    I wondered about that myself. I was really puzzled, given the performance difference, that the 1660 and 1660Ti both had a 120W TDP.
    They use different type VRAM, which should explain why the Ti can be more energy efficient.

    King_V said:
    While I can't imagine Nvidia doing this, I'd be a little surprised if the 1660 Super wound up using MORE power than the 1660Ti.
    Change in memory type (1660 to 1660 Super) allows more speed at lower power. Power consumption should be close between Super and Ti.

    King_V said:
    If the 1650 Super is a 100W card, what is it going to perform like? And, is it going to be inefficient relative to the 1660/1660Ti given that they are 120W cards?
    1650 Super will be faster than the 1650, obviously. Power efficiency could be (marginally) better than 1650 and 1660 because of GDDR6, question is if the significantly increased VRAM speed will be seen in a corresponding performance increase.
    Reply