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Watch Nvidia's GeForce Gaming Celebration Here, Official Turing Announcement Expected

Nvidia is holding the Gaming Celebration "BeForTheGame" event at an offsite location in Germany the day before Gamescom 2018 begins. The company is expected to announce new a major new consumer GPU, which we believe will be called the RTX 2080.

Nvidia's announcement said the event will be loaded with "new, exclusive, hands-on demos of the hottest upcoming games, stage presentations from the world’s biggest game developers, and some spectacular surprises," so there will surely be a few exciting announcements at the show. As expected, Nvidia CEO Jensen Huang will host the event.

Nvidia's Pascal debuted in May 2016. After more than two years of Pascal, Nvidia announced its Turing architecture last week. The Turing architecture debuts in the Quadro RTX graphics cards for the workstation segment, but of course we are far more interested in the forthcoming gaming GPUs.

We do have quite a bit of information that tells us what to expect from the Turing-based gaming GPUs. Graphics card maker PNY recently listed the GeForce RTX 2080 Ti Overclocked XLR8 Edition and its RTX 2080 8GB XLR8 Gaming Overclocked Edition for a jaw-dropping $1,000 and $800, respectively. These are premium overclocked models, so pricing is obviously much higher than what we will see for vanilla cards. It's also possible this pricing is subject to change, or merely a placeholder.

Regardless, PNY's leaked specs are far more interesting. You can head over to our article on the subject for the full details, and also check out our Nvidia RTX 2080 Could Launch Aug. 20: What You Need to Know feature for the latest news on other new features, like VirtualLink, a standard over USB Type-C for next-gen VR headsets.

Finally, pictures of MSI's GeForce RTX 2080 & 2080 Ti GPUs leaked out yesterday, so there is plenty to feast your eyes on while you wait for the livestream to start at 9 AM PT on August 20. 

  • dimar
    Hopefully people are smart enough not to buy any of these cards until NVIDIA supports VESA (which includes NVIDIA) adaptive-sync tech.
    Reply
  • JTWrenn
    Yeah that is not going to happen. I am more hopeful that Intel in 2020 and AMD eventually will actually give Nvidia direct competition.
    Reply
  • giovanni86
    Was hoping the Ti's would come later(more Vram). Heres to hoping the Titan PTX will have enormous amount of vram.
    Reply
  • AgentLozen
    There's always a guy that needs some bizarre specs to satisfy his work needs.

    But really though, if 11GB or 8GB of memory isn't enough then you're going to have to use the Quadro versions of these cards. I bet that Nvidia doesn't want to overlap its gaming cards with its workstation cards so it keeps them separate by limiting the amount of VRAM on gaming side.
    Reply
  • rantoc
    Looks like the darn NVlink Bridge that's needed to SLI 2x 2080(ti)'s will cost 1/2 a frigging card - A darn bridge - Ridiculous!
    Reply
  • Dantte
    21246172 said:
    Hopefully people are smart enough not to buy any of these cards until NVIDIA supports VESA (which includes NVIDIA) adaptive-sync tech.

    Lets get this straight, you expect Nvidia to support VESA (an inferior technology), but you dont think AMD should have to support G-sync?

    - just because its an open standard, doesnt mean its any good or everyone should have to implement it. *FYI : VESA is technically not open, to implement it and say a monitor is VESA compliant, a company has to be a member of VESA which cost thousands each year.
    Reply
  • gggplaya
    21246172 said:
    Hopefully people are smart enough not to buy any of these cards until NVIDIA supports VESA (which includes NVIDIA) adaptive-sync tech.

    I'm just hoping AMD has a competitive 7nm video card to compete with the GTX2060. I'm not looking to spend $800, but $300-$400 is ok for me.
    Reply
  • Krazie_Ivan
    21248129 said:
    21246172 said:
    Hopefully people are smart enough not to buy any of these cards until NVIDIA supports VESA (which includes NVIDIA) adaptive-sync tech.

    Lets get this straight, you expect Nvidia to support VESA (an inferior technology), but you dont think AMD should have to support G-sync?

    1- Adaptive / Freesync & G-sync are effectively the same to the viewer. neither offers notable improvement over the other, nor does either have notable drawbacks that the other overcomes. this has been tested thoroughly... like, horse beatingly thorough.

    2- AMD does not have the option to support G-sync. Nvidia will not allow it, as it's incentive for their userbase to be locked into an ecosystem that requires a further purchase to use the feature (the unit itself, built into the monitor). comparatively, there is absolutely nothing keeping Nvidia from supporting Adaptive / Freesync (aside from the loss of R&D/mfg/marketing funds already invested in G-sync, and profits).
    Reply
  • AgentLozen
    Krazie_Ivan said:
    2- AMD does not have the option to support G-sync. Nvidia will not allow it, as it's incentive for their userbase to be locked into an ecosystem that requires a further purchase to use the feature (the unit itself, built into the monitor).

    I really really want AMD and Freesync to succeed but I don't feel the need to buy an AMD GPU unless they become more competitive with Nvidia.
    Nvidia is acting like Apple using proprietary technologies and charging incredible amounts for their products (according to the recent rumors). I hate Apple for doing this but if there's no good alternative then I have to take the hit.
    Reply
  • rantoc
    Hope it will have info about lowered prices on the NVlink bridges if they are indeed used for SLI. As it stands they will charge what 0.5 2080TI will cost if the rumors about the gfx card prices are true - 500$ for a frigging bridge WTF
    Reply