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SNES Classic Pre-Orders Open, Immediately Close

Good luck getting the SNES Classic. Best Buy and Amazon opened pre-orders for the retro game console this morning, and within minutes, both retailers sold through all of their stock. Now you have two options: line up for the console's official debut or buy a pre-order unit from a scalper.

None of this comes as a surprise. Nintendo's first retro console, the NES Classic, was also continually sold out and sold by scalpers throughout its all-too-short lifespan. As it turns out, many people are in the market for miniature game consoles loaded with some of their favorite games from times past. (Or, for the younger generation, a bunch of games they've heard a lot about but haven't had an easy way to play until now.)

The SNES Classic delivers on that front. Crammed within its itty-bitty casing are classic titles like The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past, Super Metroid, and other games from Nintendo's golden era. The console also comes with two wired controllers, an HDMI cable, and a USB charging cable and AC adapter, so you can enjoy these games on a modern TV instead of scrambling to find a CRT from the annals of television history.

Nintendo announced today that the SNES Classic has another intriguing feature. The company said in a press release:

Nintendo also revealed that the upcoming Super Nintendo Entertainment System: Super NES Classic Edition system includes a Rewind feature that lets players rewind their gameplay to retry tricky sections, pick up missed items or simply run through an area again to see if anything was missed. The rewind time depends on the kind of game: Players can go back a few minutes in role-playing games such as Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars, while action titles such as Super Mario World offer around 40 seconds, ideal for re-trying short segments of gameplay. The system also comes with optional frames that can be wrapped around the on-screen display for each game.

That feature could be a godsend for impatient gamers. SNES-era games wore their arcade influences on their sleeves, which means they almost revel in killing players. In arcades, this difficulty is supposed to get people to spend more of their precious quarters. For early consoles, difficulty was a way to stretch out a game's play time, due to the limited space on their cartridges. Neither justification is likely to gel with modern gamers.

The SNES Classic will officially debut on September 29. You can sign up to be notified about the console's release—or perhaps another batch of pre-orders—from Best Buy and Amazon. Or, if you just have to get the console, you can fork over a couple hundred bucks to eBay sellers.

  • bloodroses
    And this is why they should of had protection against scripts used for scalpers. They had to do similar for sporting events and music concerts.

    Either way, still no chance in hell I'd buy one since Nintendo already screwed everyone over on the NES classic; and plan to do the same with the SNES classic. It makes be feel proud at this point playing those ROMS on my Pi3. :)
    Reply
  • turkey3_scratch
    20090601 said:
    And this is why they should of had protection against scripts used for scalpers. They had to do similar for sporting events and music concerts.

    Either way, still no chance in hell I'd buy one since Nintendo already screwed everyone over on the NES classic; and plan to do the same with the SNES classic. It makes be feel proud at this point playing those ROMS on my Pi3. :)
    They could easily make a CAPTCHA required to purchase the product, or implement a system that analyzes the amount of time it takes to initiate and complete the order. If it's under like 1 second then they know it's a bot. I don't think it's very fair to people who want to just purchase the product,
    Reply
  • MasterMace
    Unlike modern consoles my SNES still works, why would I need this?
    Reply
  • turkey3_scratch
    20090637 said:
    Unlike modern consoles my SNES still works, why would I need this?

    Because not everyone has a SNES, and this comes with a bunch of preloaded games and has some other nice features, and can use HDMI to connect to a modern television. Just because a product is not for you does not mean it's not for other people.
    Reply
  • derekullo
    (Or, for the younger generation, a bunch of games they've heard a lot about but haven't "had an easy way to play until now.)"

    The younger generation would just use an emulator to play snes games.
    (At least that's what I would do if I wanted to play Zelda A Link to the Past.)

    The only buyers I see for these kind of old school devices are Nintendo collectors and the scalpers trying to profit off of the aforementioned Nintendo collectors.
    Reply
  • Hellbound
    I was able to pre-order one from BB..
    Reply
  • why_wolf
    Of course they open for sale a 1AM so only scalper bots could possibly buy them.
    Reply
  • 10tacle
    I have not checked in many years, but there was always a never ending supply of used consoles and games for sale on eBay and Craig's List. I was always interested in what I could sell my old consoles and games for (NES, Sega Genesis, N64).

    This was before the apparent retro gaming craze though. Fortunately I kept them and will never get rid of them. I got rid of a girlfriend over them who wanted me to get rid of "junk" (women: don't ever tell a gamer boyfriend what to throw away that is sentimental to him).
    Reply
  • Jake Hall
    Still have my original SNES and it works beautifully. Plus all my ROMS on the HTPC. I'm all set
    Reply
  • zippyzion
    E-mail notifications don't work. I'm signed up with Best Buy and Amazon and didn't get notified last year for the NES Classic or this year so far with the SNES. You need to be a clairvoyant robot to get one of these at the rate things are going. It is almost like retailers don't even care about consumers as long as they can sell their entire stock.
    Reply