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Corsair RM650x PSU Review

Another Corsair PSU is in the lab, commanding our attention. We already reviewed the RM750x and RM550x, so we couldn't leave out the RM650x. It promises the same high performance as its siblings, along with super quiet operation.

Packaging, Contents, Exterior, And Cabling

Packaging

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On the front of the box there's a picture of the PSU with its modular panel exposed. Right next to it are two badges depicting the efficiency certification and provided warranty, which was recently upgraded from seven to 10 years. The series and model descriptions stand out in large letters on a yellow background.

A short feature list in three languages appears on the side, while up top there's a graphical description of the available connectors that includes cable length. Around back, you'll find additional details like the efficiency and fan noise curves, the unit's dimensions, and a power specifications table.

Contents

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The outer sleeve hides a sturdy cardboard with Corsair's logo printed on it. Inside, the contents are well-protected. The PSU is surrounded by recyclable material instead of packing foam and a nice cloth bag protects the RM650x, adding a luxurious touch.

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Bundled accessories include several zip ties, an AC power cord, a case badge, a set of screws for mounting the PSU, the user's manual, a warranty guide, and a pouch for storing unused modular cables. It's always nice to have somewhere to collect unused extras, even if the pouch adds a bit to the final price.

Exterior

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A label almost covers the AC receptacle, informing you that the RM650x's fan won't spin under low and moderate loads. This is especially helpful to those who aren't familiar with semi-passive operation. In fact, when the PSU starts up, its fan spins briefly to show you it's operating properly.

The power switch is located next to the AC socket, while the front exhaust grille is based on a familiar honeycomb design.

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On the sides, decals depict the unit's model number. A power specification label can be found on the bottom. 

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The finish is semi-matte. It exudes quality and doesn't attract fingerprints. Up top, the fan grille is a typical Corsair design with parallel lines.

Meanwhile, around back, the modular panel has nine sockets. Three of them correspond to PCIe and EPS cables. Since there's clearly enough room, again, we'd like to see Corsair add an extra EPS socket.

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Physically, the PSU's footprint is quite small. Its fan grille is eye-catching too, since the rest of the external design is pretty boring. As we've said before, it's probably time for Corsair's team to come up with a better-looking chassis for the company's high-end models.

Cabling

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The ATX, PCIe, and EPS cables are round to accommodate their extra filtering capacitors. The peripheral cables are flat though, so they'll help facilitate increased airflow inside your case. All of the cables are black, blending in well with dark interiors. 

  • maxwellmelon
    for all the good listed in this article, this series of psu just gets bashed in the fourms, just interesting.
    Reply
  • basroil
    18305746 said:
    for all the good listed in this article, this series of psu just gets bashed in the fourms, just interesting.

    You're thinking of the older RM650, different design.

    The review here just made this unit be one of my recommended 650 models, tied with the EVGA G2/P2 and just below the Seasonic 660XP2!
    Reply
  • pjc6281
    I have had this PSU for my new Skylake build for 2 months. Its GREAT, quiet and even have it pushing my old dinosaur Nvidia 590 with no problems. My old power supply was a Corsair AX1200 that was rock solid as well. Nothing but good experiences with them. I know others differ.
    Reply
  • Dark Lord of Tech
    RMX doesn't get bashed , RMX and RMI are very very good. I own the RMX 850 , GREAT UNIT.
    Reply
  • TechyInAZ
    I'm glad the new RM series is much higher quality. All I remember Corsair having is a bunch of bad PSUs with select few good PSU (like AX and HX).

    I hope this same kind of quality intros into other models like the newly refreshed CX PSUs.
    Reply
  • anort3
    18305746 said:
    for all the good listed in this article, this series of psu just gets bashed in the fourms, just interesting.

    Yeah, I believe you are confusing the RMx and RMi with the older, mostly discontinued RM line. And of the old RM line only the 750w and 850w versions that were first made by Chicony Power Technology had the bad reputation. Anyone bashing the RMx and RMi doesn't know what they are talking about. Once misinformation gets out there it's hard to get it corrected though.

    Another great review Aris! :)
    Reply
  • Nintendork
    Why buy Corsair or EVGA when you can get a Seasonic?
    Reply
  • anort3
    18308072 said:
    Why buy Corsair or EVGA when you can get a Seasonic?

    Seasonic doesn't have a lock on quality. They also don't offer a 10 year warranty which both Corsair and EVGA do on some models. Just off the top of my head Flextronics, CWT and SuperFlower are all capable of making units that are at least equal to high end Seasonic quality. There are others as well.
    Reply
  • TechyInAZ
    18308188 said:
    18308072 said:
    Why buy Corsair or EVGA when you can get a Seasonic?

    Seasonic doesn't have a lock on quality. They also don't offer a 10 year warranty which both Corsair and EVGA do on some models. Just off the top of my head Flextronics, CWT and SuperFlower are all capable of making units that are at least equal to high end Seasonic quality. There are others as well.

    Plus, efficiency levels are typically better with EVGA than Seasonic.
    Reply
  • anort3
    18308342 said:
    18308188 said:
    18308072 said:
    Why buy Corsair or EVGA when you can get a Seasonic?

    Seasonic doesn't have a lock on quality. They also don't offer a 10 year warranty which both Corsair and EVGA do on some models. Just off the top of my head Flextronics, CWT and SuperFlower are all capable of making units that are at least equal to high end Seasonic quality. There are others as well.

    Plus, efficiency levels are typically better with EVGA than Seasonic.

    :??: Not sure what you mean. EVGA has a couple of 80 Plus Titanium models but Seasonic has Titanium models in their new lineup. I'm not sure if those new Seasonic models are available yet though. Other than that I've had an 80 Plus Platinum Seasonic ( 660XP2 ) for a couple of years and their Platinum line has been out since at least 2011.
    Reply