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Lenovo Ideapad Y700-17 Gaming Laptop First Look

Benchmarks And Conclusion

We're running some synthetic and gaming benchmarks to give you an idea of how the Ideapad Y700-17 performs. Our suite includes PCMark 8, 3DMark Firestrike, GFXBench and Unigine Valley, along with Bioshock Infinite and Metro: Last Light Redux. The Y700-17 is being compared to Lenovo's Y700-15 Touch and Acer's Predator 15. We also threw in results from the Gigabyte P37X v4.

As a reminder, the P37X v4 employs a fifth-generation Core i7-5700HQ, while the Predator 15 and two Lenovos include Skylake-based Core i7-6700HQs. The P37X v4 and Predator 15 both sport GeForce GTX 980M modules, although the Predator 15's 980M only has 4GB of GDDR5. The Broadwell-powered P37X v4 contains 16GB of DDR3 memory. The Predator 15 and the two Lenovos contain DDR4 memory; the two Lenovos contain 16GB, while the Predator 15 sports 32GB. The Lenovo laptops feature 1080p IPS panels (15-inch multi-touch for the Y700-15 Touch and 17.3-inch for the Y700-17). The P37X v4 has a 17.3-inch FHD IPS display.

Synthetic Benchmark - PCMark 8

Lenovo Ideapad Y700-17 Laptop
Lenovo Ideapad Y700-17 Laptop

PCMark 8 scores attempt to represent real-world performance. The Home module consists largely of Web browsing, writing, gaming and photo editing. The Creative test includes a lot of content creation, transcoding and gaming. Finally, Work is built on office-oriented tasks like browsing, working in spreadsheets and video chat. All of our PCMark 8 runs utilize OpenCL acceleration when possible.

The Y700-17 performed slightly better than Lenovo's Y700-15 Touch, and it fared relatively well against the higher-end Predator 15 and P37X v4 systems.

Synthetic Benchmark - 3DMark Fire Strike

3DMark Fire Strike attempts to convey how a system will perform under a demanding graphics workload. Since the Y700-17's internals are almost identical to the Y700-15 Touch, there wasn't a big discrepancy between them. Our 17-inch sample was a little slower, though you wouldn't see the difference in a real game. However, the Y700-17 falls dramatically behind the Predator 15 and the P37X v4, which are both equipped with GeForce GTX 980M modules.

Synthetic Benchmark - GFXBench

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During the High-Level tests, Lenovo's Y700-17 performed similarly to the Y700-15 Touch, as expected. What we didn't anticipate was how well it'd fare against the much stronger (and more expensive) Predator 15.

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The Low-Level tests paint a similar picture; the Y700-17 scored similarly to the Y700-15 Touch. Our Y700-17 falls behind the Predator 15, but not spectacularly so. 

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Finally, during the Battery test, Lenovo's Y700-17 scored an average of nearly 28 FPS during the slowest run. We have to imagine that the larger screen hurts battery life somewhat compared to the Y700-15 Touch.

Lenovo Ideapad Y700-17 Laptop
Lenovo Ideapad Y700-17 Laptop

Synthetic Benchmark - Unigine Valley

Since the Y700-17 sports the same performance specs as Lenovo's smaller Y700-15 Touch, we used the same benchmark settings (High Quality preset at 1920x1080, using DirectX 11 and disabling the Anti-Aliasing option). The Y700-17 may not have the strongest processor, but it still garners a respectable score.

Gaming Benchmark - Bioshock Infinite

Bioshock Infinite is well-optimized and not as taxing as the synthetic benchmarks. Most modern GPUs easily cut through it, and Nvidia's GeForce GTX 960M is no exception. The Y700-17's average performance was well over 100 FPS, and rarely did it dip below 60 FPS.

Gaming Benchmark - Metro: Last Light Redux

Metro: Last Light Redux is much more demanding. Still, the GeForce GTX 960M achieves acceptable frame rates with its settings scaled back. We went with a Medium quality preset with SSAA off, Texture Filtering at Anisotropic Filtering 4X, Motion Blur off, Tessellation at Normal, Vsync disabled and Advanced PhysX turned off. The benchmark scene was run once, with the Y700-17 scoring an average of 54.46 FPS.

Conclusion

The 17-inch Lenovo IdeaPad Y700 features solid build quality and capable performance in an elegant package. Our benchmarks illustrate that it performs nearly the same as the company's Y700-15 Touch, and all of that notebook's strengths are evident here as well. You simply give up the touch-capable panel and gain more screen space. Then again, the same weaknesses show up too, though, like the uneven trackpad.

The two systems are comparable that, really, it's going to be a form factor decision if you're set on Lenovo's offering.

As I write this, the Y700-17 we tested sold for $1,350, while the Y700-15 Touch we previously tested was available for $1,300. For $50, you have to pick between touch or a 17" display.

Interestingly, a non-touch Y700-15 with similar specifications is available for $1,350. That's the same price as the Y700-17, which is more expensive than the Y700-15 Touch. Then again, Lenovo does have weekly deals on the Y700 line, and its prices are constantly fluctuating. Just keep an eye out for the Y700 that suits your needs best.

Alexander Quejado is an Associate Contributing Writer for Tom’s Hardware and Tom’s IT Pro. Follow Alexander Quejado on Twitter. 

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  • MailDeadDrop
    I'm disappointed this is another 17" 1080p display. Why aren't there more 1280p or 1440p offerings in 17" form factors? I'm not asking for 4K (that's just silly), but a *little* more resolution like 2048x1280 or 2560x1440 would be nice.
    Reply
  • TechyInAZ
    17432439 said:
    I'm disappointed this is another 17" 1080p display. Why aren't there more 1280p or 1440p offerings in 17" form factors? I'm not asking for 4K (that's just silly), but a *little* more resolution like 2048x1280 or 2560x1440 would be nice.

    I believe it's because of the GPU inside of this laptop. The 960m isn't powerful, 1080P is the max resolution it can game at well. Crank it to 2k and you'll have to put details down to medium.

    However I do agree with 2k panels on higher end laptops with 980Ms. Especially laptops with a 980 inside of them, it doesn't make sense to stick with 1080P.
    Reply
  • hst101rox
    Yeah only benefit is for playing ultra HD movies on a laptop not equipped with a 980/980m.
    Reply
  • x3style
    Unfortunately, with that great keyboard you get the same lackluster trackpad. If only Lenovo put as much emphasis on this component. In my previous Lenovo Ideapad Y700-15 Touch commentary, I had issues with the trackpad while clicking. The Y700-17 experience is no different.
    The trackpad has a uniform actuation point and an uneven stopping point, which feels unpleasant. Additionally, you have to worry about small particles getting stuck beneath the trackpad while clicking. In this case, instead of using the trackpad, I'd recommend a mouse. Lenovo could have included its popular TrackPoint.
    Who games on a trackpad? Like really? Anyone heard of anyone able o game on a track pad?

    On the other hand i can understand at this price point that at least something half decent be included.
    Reply
  • x3style
    17433556 said:
    17432439 said:
    I'm disappointed this is another 17" 1080p display. Why aren't there more 1280p or 1440p offerings in 17" form factors? I'm not asking for 4K (that's just silly), but a *little* more resolution like 2048x1280 or 2560x1440 would be nice.

    I believe it's because of the GPU inside of this laptop. The 960m isn't powerful, 1080P is the max resolution it can game at well. Crank it to 2k and you'll have to put details down to medium.

    However I do agree with 2k panels on higher end laptops with 980Ms. Especially laptops with a 980 inside of them, it doesn't make sense to stick with 1080P.

    I would rather have have more gaming laptops come with god damn gaming screens. Where's the 100/120hz screens?
    Do you see the tearing in 980/980M ? Get some gaming screens.

    Reply
  • mapesdhs
    Depends on the game. Plenty of people play games which don't need crazy high refresh rates for smooth play. Still, probably a sensible option to include on high-end models, but I would not include the 980M in that category.

    Reply
  • Afrospinach
    I'm disappointed this is another 17" 1080p display. Why aren't there more 1280p or 1440p offerings in 17" form factors? I'm not asking for 4K (that's just silly), but a *little* more resolution like 2048x1280 or 2560x1440 would be nice.

    I find this a little ironic. I search for ages for a decent gpu mated to a 1080p screen as 4k is running rampant like it is going out of style.

    Good luck with that laptop gpu and the 1440p though. Even my 970ftw does not always meet the bar while being more powerful than anything available in a laptop.In a GAMING laptop to me this makes nothing but sense. I ended up with a 950m and I have it say it impressed me a lot, even GTA V is very playable @1080. 960m has you covered.
    Reply
  • mapesdhs
    Depends on to what extent one likes to crank up the detail. Even the older games I play would be too slow with a 960M. In the end I bought a 970M system (MSI SkyLake) and I'm glad I did. Benching showed, as expected, the 970M is about on par with a desktop GTX 580. Oblivion IV runs really well with everything maxed out & custom settings, but Crysis would be too slow with the custom profile I normally use on a desktop (45fps with desktop 580 3GB SLI). Would have been nice to get a 980M, but the price jump was a bit too much, and I can live with slightly reduced settings.

    For newer titles though which impose a much greater load, I'm sure I'd find anything less than a 970M to be annoying, unable to crank up shadow detail, draw distance & LOD settings, etc. That sort of thing in a sandbox game with grand vista views really makes a difference for me. As I say though, all depends on the game and one's personal preferences, but I do get the impression sometimes that people forget how much slower the mobile parts are compared to the deskop editions with the related model name. Naturally, a proper 980 in a gaming laptop would be nice, but that really whacks up the price, and the system weight, power draw, etc.
    Reply
  • hst101rox
    17437060 said:
    Unfortunately, with that great keyboard you get the same lackluster trackpad. If only Lenovo put as much emphasis on this component. In my previous Lenovo Ideapad Y700-15 Touch commentary, I had issues with the trackpad while clicking. The Y700-17 experience is no different.
    The trackpad has a uniform actuation point and an uneven stopping point, which feels unpleasant. Additionally, you have to worry about small particles getting stuck beneath the trackpad while clicking. In this case, instead of using the trackpad, I'd recommend a mouse. Lenovo could have included its popular TrackPoint.
    Who games on a trackpad? Like really? Anyone heard of anyone able o game on a track pad?

    On the other hand i can understand at this price point that at least something half decent be included.

    Well people don't always game on a gaming laptop. Sometimes they use it for work/school/other and they don't have an external mouse handy. It's a knock because Lenovo could have designed the touchpad better. No reason to make it crappy
    Reply
  • mapesdhs
    It's doubly sad given the robustness of the original ThinkPad plaform. I used a T40 for years before finally buying an MSI recently. The MSI has a decent enough trackpad, but it's still easier and more comfortable dealing with emails & general net work/net stuff with the gaming mouse (nothing mega fancy, just an A4Tech V7, but I like it).
    Reply