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Report: Intel Delaying Support for USB 3.0

Last week EE Times reported that Intel Corp. has decided to delay its support for USB 3.0 until 2011. According to a "top tier" PC manufacturer who chose to remain nameless, Intel's hesitation will put mainstream adoption of the new USB standard on hold for at least a year. Intel originally planned to sample chipsets supporting USB 3.0 in early 2010, but now those plans have changed; Intel's PC technology manager even confirmed the report.

EE Times thus contacted a spokesperson from Intel and asked about the delay. The contact said the he didn't know anything about the supposed delay, and declined to comment any further on the subject. Currently Intel is focused on supporting the company's first processor architecture to use an integrated memory controller, Nehalem, and is also working on transitioning to the 5 GHz PCI Express 2.0 spec.

Still, that won't stop some companies from jumping onto the SuperSpeed USB bandwagon, releasing high-end consumer systems and graphic workstations... but not without a high cost. "It's hard to commit to an emerging technology like this when the key silicon enablers (meaning Intel) are not making it a priority," the source said. "You get into a chicken-and-egg situation."

EE Time's source also added that Intel needs to consider the "compelling needs" for USB 3.0 now versus 18 months later.

  • ubernoobie
    aww... I have to stick for amd for usb 3.0 then :(
    Reply
  • jimmysmitty
    Well thats too bad if true.

    I mean we don't really need the speed (6.8Gbps) but it would be nice. As long as it doesn't get rushed and cause problems when it comes out.
    Reply
  • ominous prime
    Glad I didn't wait for USB 3.0 before I upgraded to a new computer now. I'm surprised USB 3.0 isn't more of a priority to Intel.
    Reply
  • Upendra09
    "top tier" who want to remain unnamed

    sure ok
    Reply
  • claudeb
    eSATA. I dont need a mouse and keyboard running off of usb 3.0.
    Reply
  • dheadley
    I don't see why they are even saying that they will support it in 2011. There is nothing saying they have to support it at all. They can just end their USB support at 2.0 and move on to their new fiber technology. So what if people get left at the USB 2.0 level? They don't lose anything they have invested in peripherals.

    It's not like they haven't dropped other technologies before and left people out of luck in future motherboards. AGP slots, chip sockets, memory slots, etc.. Heck PCI slots, Parallel and serial ports, PS2 connections will all disappear soon.
    Reply
  • enforcer22
    dheadleyI don't see why they are even saying that they will support it in 2011. There is nothing saying they have to support it at all. They can just end their USB support at 2.0 and move on to their new fiber technology. So what if people get left at the USB 2.0 level? They don't lose anything they have invested in peripherals. It's not like they haven't dropped other technologies before and left people out of luck in future motherboards. AGP slots, chip sockets, memory slots, etc.. Heck PCI slots, Parallel and serial ports, PS2 connections will all disappear soon.

    Your comprasin is actualy way off here.. each one of those things LIKE USB 3 was a universal standard "upgrade" they got rid of pci for agp for video then agp for pci e. memory advanced all these advancements and changing to them is different then deciding to not adopt them. Besides having a single universal port is much nicer then 20 different ones. i cant say i have personaly used any of those slots in the past few years. maybe pci more recently but yeah.
    Reply
  • Honis
    I was planning on buying the expansion slot version for my main PC. This does put a kink in my plans to hold off my purchase of a laptop until USB 3.0 is released. I use my laptops for 3-4 year time periods and I'm hitting year 3.5.
    Reply
  • wintermint
    Grrr bad move Intel but a delay could be a blessing in disguise :o
    Reply
  • dheadley
    EnFoRceR22Your comprasin is actualy way off here.. each one of those things LIKE USB 3 was a universal standard "upgrade" they got rid of pci for agp for video then agp for pci e. memory advanced all these advancements and changing to them is different then deciding to not adopt them. Besides having a single universal port is much nicer then 20 different ones. i cant say i have personaly used any of those slots in the past few years. maybe pci more recently but yeah.
    How would Intel adopting Light Peak as their next advancement for connections be any different than the move from PCI to AGP to PCI Express? USB 3.0 is not established in the market as a universal standard yet. In developing USB 3.0 they came up with the idea for Light Peak and they themselves seem to think it is a better technology. So why would they have any need of going forward with USB 3.0 at this point? If they have both technologies at the same stage development, why not choose one and make that your next step? They are the biggest maker of motherboard chipsets in the world, if they say Light Peak is it, peripheral makers are not going to go with AMD or VIA to get USB 3. They will start making Light Peak hard drives, peripherals and USB to Light Peak hubs etc..

    If there is a better technology developed before the next iteration of a series is released that new version may never catch on in any great degree. just look at Firewire 800 and will there ever be a Firewire 1600 and 3200 as planned, or the fiber based 6.4 version talked about. Nothing says USB has to continue on at all.
    Reply