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Ampere Preps 7nm 128-Core Server CPU to Take on AMD and Intel

Ampere Altra (Image credit: Ampere)

Today, Ampere announced plans to expand its Altra family of server processors with the Altra Max chip, which arriving by the end of the year with a whopping 128 CPU cores.

Similar to the Amazon Graviton2, the Ampere Altra is based on Arm's Neoverse N1 (codename Ares) microarchitecture. TSMC carves the Altra for Ampere with its 7nm FinFET manufacturing process. The Altra family currently features 11 different models, however, the list and specifications are subject to change. 

Each core inside the Ampere Altra corresponds to a single thread and comes with its own cache. We're looking at 65KB of L1I cache, 64KB of L1D cache and 1MB of L2 cache per core. 

As for the Altra line's other attributes, the 7nm processors each support up to eight channels of DDR4-3200 ECC memory and a maximum capacity up to 4TB . For expansion, the Altra provides 128 lanes of high-speed PCIe 4.0 lanes per socket, but also support up to 192 PCIe 4.0 lanes in a 2P setup.

Ampere Altra Specifications

ModelCoresFrequency (GHz)TDP (W)
Q80-33803.3250
Q80-30803.0210
Q80-28802.8175
Q80-26802.6150
Q72-30723.0195
Q64-33643.3220
Q64-30643.0180
Q64-26642.6125
Q64-24642.495
Q48-22482.285
Q32-17321.745 - 58

Ampere has one of the simplest CPU nomenclatures known to mankind. The Q, which stands for Quicksilver, is followed by the chip's number of cores and then the clock speed

The Q80-33 is the current flagship of the Altra family. The processor delivers 80 cores up to 3.3 GHz within a 250W package. 

The Q80-33 will eventually pass the torch to the Altra Max, which will flaunt up to 128 cores. Ampere has confirmed that the Altra Max (codename Mystique) will be socket-compatible with current Altra offerings. We suspect that the the Altra Max will have an M prefix in its model names.

Ampere will sample the Altra Max in the fourth quarter of this year, and the processor should be available next year. 

The company is also firm on its commitment to roll out the 2nd Generation Altra processors (codename Siryn) in 2022. If the nomenclature remains the same, the Siryn should sport the S prefix. The next-generation processors will leverage TSMC's 5nm process node.

Ampere expects to sample Siryn in the latter part of 2021 with a scheduled launch in 2022.

  • spongiemaster
    Admin said:
    Ampere has revealed new details its Altra family of server processors.

    Ampere Preps 7nm 128-Core Server CPU to Take on AMD and Intel : Read more
    Huh? I thought that picture was of the upcoming Nvidia 5nm GPU.

    https://www.tomshardware.com/news/nvidia-5nm-chip
    Reply
  • Deicidium369
    spongiemaster said:
    Huh? I thought that picture was of the upcoming Nvidia 5nm GPU.

    https://www.tomshardware.com/news/nvidia-5nm-chip
    Yeah not sure why that pic was used in that article - She saw Ampere and thought it was Nvidia. The pic is correct for this article
    Reply
  • gg83
    If arm based cpus are that powerful, does it mean x86 is doomed?
    Reply
  • gg83
    with cloacks at 2 ghz, they should be able to reach 4ghz eventually right? Then the performance will be even better.
    Reply
  • gg83
    Here's an awesome Coreteks about Fugaku. eXhlDt2SD8oView: https://youtu.be/eXhlDt2SD8o
    Reply
  • Alvar "Miles" Udell
    Would be interesting to see some benchmarks between it and a 64C/128T EPYC CPU...
    Reply
  • Deicidium369
    gg83 said:
    If arm based cpus are that powerful, does it mean x86 is doomed?
    No. 90% of the software ever written run on Intel. So x86/64 isn't going any where.
    Reply
  • deesider
    Alvar Miles Udell said:
    Would be interesting to see some benchmarks between it and a 64C/128T EPYC CPU...
    Anandtech have compared the latest Amazon Graviton cpu based on the same ARM architecture as Ampere, against EPYC and Xeon - gives some insight to the future battles of ARM vs X86 : https://www.anandtech.com/show/15578/cloud-clash-amazon-graviton2-arm-against-intel-and-amd
    Reply
  • bit_user
    Ampere has one of the simplest CPU nomenclatures known to mankind. The Q, which stands for Quicksilver, is followed by the chip's number of cores and then the clock speed.
    Yes. Thank you!
    Reply
  • bit_user
    Deicidium369 said:
    No. 90% of the software ever written run on Intel. So x86/64 isn't going any where.
    Exactly. Which is why someone like Amazon would never...

    ...what? ...they did? ...they actually designed their own ARM CPU? Oh.

    * sells Intel shares *
    https://www.zdnet.com/article/aws-graviton2-what-it-means-for-arm-in-the-data-center-cloud-enterprise-aws/
    Reply