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HP Brings AMD Ryzen to its Small Business ProBooks

HP is moving its small business notebooks onto AMD’s Ryzen quad-core processor platforms. The HP ProBook 445 G6 and ProBook 455 G6 will rely on Ryzen and Ryzen Pro APUs, rather than the current gen’s mix of 8th Gen Intel Core i CPUs and AMD A10-series APUs.

Both machines will go on sale this month starting at $549. Beyond the processors, HP is touting its clean, silver design and its BIOS protection and easy system management.

The base models use AMD’s Ryzen 3 2200U with Radeon Vega 3 graphics, but there are also options for a Ryzen 5 2500 U with Radeon Vega 8 and, at the top end, AMD Ryzen 7 Pro 2700U with Radeon RX Vega 10 graphics.

The laptops are almost identical, save for different screen sizes. The 445 has a 14-inch display (1366 x 768 or 1920 x 1080) and the 455 has a 15.6-inch screen (same resolutions). Both use up to 16GB of DDR4-2400 SDRAM, up to 1TB of storage and have the same ports: two USB 3.1 Gen1 ports, a USB Type-C port, USB 2.0, Ethernet, HDMI and a headphone jack.

AMD’s Ryzen chips are still being integrated slowly into laptops, but business adoption could mean large shipments for companies that have IT departments with contracts with HP. This year, we expect to see more laptops for productivity and gaming come with Ryzen options.

  • BulkZerker
    This is great news for AMD as the mobile market is one place they have always struggled in.
    Reply
  • hannibal
    I am more interested in when we get 7nm versions of Ryzen to laptops. Their energy effiency would definitely be usefull in laptops! Next year?
    Reply
  • DragonAstaXiel
    ^ cheers to that ^.^
    Reply
  • LordConrad
    Up to 16GB of RAM?? Please tell me that OEMs aren't still crippling AMD laptops by limiting them to single channel RAM.
    Reply
  • John Freiman
    But the devices follow the same trend that HP and other laptop manufacturers have always done with AMD CPU and APU devices - they immediately place them at a disadvantage of low resolution screens!!
    768p on ANY screen size is unacceptable and consumers will not buy it - especially business users!
    1080p 2 years ago was more than acceptable, but a produxt released in 2019 which tops out at 1080p is dead out of the box.
    Truly sad. AMD, AMD fans and consumers deserve better - much, much better.
    Reply
  • mischon123
    @John 1080p is fine on an allround laptop for schoolwork, email, youpron. The AMD Ryzen 7 Pro 2700U with Radeon RX Vega 10 graphics is more than decent. Long batterylife is nice but its not really a dealbreaker. There is a new invention called the wallplug. I took my Zenbook everywhere offroading Africa and its fine. Most people buying a Dell will leave it docked or tethered. If you want a full fledged workstation - they use 500-700w plus nowadays. If not - a phone/phablet is usually a better choice and some can 10h or more and then standby till you get home or to the office. t is not a critical metric.
    Reply
  • shmoochie
    21710396 said:
    But the devices follow the same trend that HP and other laptop manufacturers have always done with AMD CPU and APU devices - they immediately place them at a disadvantage of low resolution screens!!
    768p on ANY screen size is unacceptable and consumers will not buy it - especially business users!
    1080p 2 years ago was more than acceptable, but a produxt released in 2019 which tops out at 1080p is dead out of the box.
    Truly sad. AMD, AMD fans and consumers deserve better - much, much better.

    The vast majority of gamers and businesses use 1080p or below. Your statement is flipped. A laptop with anything higher than 1080p is going to sell waaaaay less because it is targeting a niche market. That's obviously changing, but it will be awhile before 2k or 4k is commonplace.
    Reply
  • Kevin_138
    The sad thing is, most of these Laptops will just sit at a desk docked to a screen, keyboard and mouse, therefore making the screen rez irrelevant.
    Reply