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Intel's 35W 8-Core 'Rocket Lake' T-Series CPUs Arrive, Just Not in the US

Intel
(Image credit: Intel)

Intel's latest low-power eight-core Core i9-11900T and Core i7-11700T 'Rocket Lake' desktop processors with a 35W TDP for LGA1200 motherboards are already available in Europe and Japan. But there's no sign of them in the U.S. yet. 

Most performance enthusiasts are eager to get Intel's unlocked K-series processors with a 95W – 125W TDP that can boost their clocks sky-high and support all the latest technologies. But there are also enthusiasts who prefer small form-factor low-power builds, but would still like to have CPUs with eight or ten cores and all the latest technologies. Intel typically addresses these users with its T-series processors featuring a 35W TDP, but sometimes these chips are hard to get. 

Intel formally introduced its low-power eight-core Core i9-11900T and Core i7-11700T 'Rocket Lake' CPUs with a 35W TDP along with their high-performance i9-11900K and i7-11700K brethren on March 30, 2021. But unlike the 'unlocked and unleashed' K-series processors, the new T-series products were not immediately available at launch. Fortunately, the situation is starting to change.  

Akiba PC Hotline and Hermitage Akihabara report that the new 35W Core i9-11900T and Core i7-11700T CPUs in bulk and boxed versions are readily available in at least four stores in Tokyo, Japan. The higher-end i9-11900T model is sold for ¥60,478 – ¥62,700 with VAT, whereas the i7-11700T SKU is priced at ¥45,078 – ¥47,300 including tax. 

Geizhals.EU, a price search engine in Europe, finds that Intel's Core i9-11900T is available in dozens of stores in Austria, Germany, and Poland starting at €455 with VAT ($462 without taxes). Meanwhile, there are no offers for the cheaper Core i7-11700T at this point. 

But at the moment, the new Rocket Lake-T CPUs are not currently available in the U.S. at Amazon and Newegg. In fact, the stores are not even taking pre-orders on these parts. The situation has already prompted enthusiasts of low-power SFF builds to start a thread at Reddit to monitor their availability. 

(Image credit: Intel)

Intel's latest Core i9-11900T and Core i7-11700T processors indeed look quite attractive. The CPUs feature eight cores with Hyper-Threading, 16MB of cache, a modern Xe-based integrated GPU and support up to 128GB of memory. Intel's i9-11900T and i7-11700T CPUs feature relatively low base frequencies of 2.00 GHz and 1.50 GHz (respectively), but rather high all-core boost clocks of 3.60 GHz and 3.70 GHz (respectively). When installed into compatible motherboards, they can hit high frequencies and pretty much guarantee great system responsiveness and decent performance in mainstream applications (assuming adequate cooling). So while these are definitely niche chips, it's not surprising that demand for these CPUs is fairly high.

  • Metal Messiah.
    Thanks for the article ! I'm really interested in grabbing one of these low power CPUs for my new SFF PC. These shouldn't be costing that much though, but the main concern is the availability of these processors globally.
    Reply
  • watzupken
    The question is how closely does the processors conform to the supposed 35W TDP. At this TDP, the base clock speed looks really crappy. Even 65W versions need at least double or more of the rates TDP to be able to achieve the advertised boost clock speed, so to get to the boost clock speed means you need a beefy cooler or let it throttle after a few seconds.
    Reply
  • cryoburner
    watzupken said:
    The question is how closely does the processors conform to the supposed 35W TDP. At this TDP, the base clock speed looks really crappy. Even 65W versions need at least double or more of the rates TDP to be able to achieve the advertised boost clock speed, so to get to the boost clock speed means you need a beefy cooler or let it throttle after a few seconds.
    The "35W" is a lie. Intel's "low-power" versions of their i7 and i9 desktop processors draw up to 123 watts when boosting (This article is for Comet Lake, but the 11700T and 11900T have the same power limit)...

    https://pcper.com/2020/06/intel-10th-gen-comet-lake-power-limits/
    They are supposed to boost for up to 28 seconds, after which they would drop to those very low 1.5 / 2.0GHz base clocks. But realistically, the vast majority of motherboards will leave them boosting indefinitely by default, meaning these are actually 123W processors unless one goes out of their way to enable settings that will significantly cripple their performance.
    Reply
  • spongiemaster
    cryoburner said:
    The "35W" is a lie. Intel's "low-power" versions of their i7 and i9 desktop processors draw up to 123 watts when boosting (This article is for Comet Lake, but the 11700T and 11900T have the same power limit)...

    https://pcper.com/2020/06/intel-10th-gen-comet-lake-power-limits/
    They are supposed to boost for up to 28 seconds, after which they would drop to those very low 1.5 / 2.0GHz base clocks. But realistically, the vast majority of motherboards will leave them boosting indefinitely by default, meaning these are actually 123W processors unless one goes out of their way to enable settings that will significantly cripple their performance.
    You may be able to find some T series in retail, but they are basically OEM CPU's designed for SFF PC's like this one from Lenovo.


    We have a few Dells systems at the company I work for that look very similar to this. These will absolutely not infinitely boost and there are no BIOS settings that will allow you to configure the system that way. The cooling in these was not designed for that. If you're tracking down a T series CPU and dropping it in an ATX Z series motherboard, you're doing it wrong.
    Reply
  • Eximo
    For the money, it can make more sense to get the regular processor, set the power limit manually, and set the clock speeds similar to that of the T. Then when you want the extra power, it is there to be had.

    I ran an i3-4130T for years as my HTPC, great, idled at like 18W. But the little dual core just got too slow. So I dropped in my old 4770k, and run it at like 3.6Ghz or something. Uses a little more power for the extra cores, but it makes web browsing a lot smoother.
    Reply